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ex HARALD JARL ::: ex ANDREA ::: SERENISSIMA :::

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  • Seagull
    started a topic ex HARALD JARL ::: ex ANDREA ::: SERENISSIMA :::

    ex HARALD JARL ::: ex ANDREA ::: SERENISSIMA :::

    This is a continuation of the thread from the old forum:
    http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/viewtopic.php?t=368

  • pakarang
    replied
    What a spectacular place to sail by.

    I bet you could sense a certain smell from the island?

    Leave a comment:


  • Clipper
    commented on 's reply
    As you say Seagull, "increasingly improbable islands"!!!

  • Clipper
    commented on 's reply
    Great photos Carptain, and good thoughts about all those millions of kilometers of prop-wash. And yes, it is undoubtedly millions!

  • Clipper
    commented on 's reply
    Truly great picture Cecilia!!!! Islands I have never even heard of.

    For anyone who enjoys "troll-hunting" #1498-2 and #1500-1 provide some rich rock formations.

  • Tommi
    replied
    Skjellig islands seems to be a cool and unique place. Thank you for showing us these pictures!

    Leave a comment:


  • DS Lyngen
    replied
    Impressive photos Cecilie
    You are really good at conveying pictures from your trip to Skellig Islands
    All the information about the places you visit is a great bonus for us who have the pleasure of following you on your trips
    Thank you

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Well, what can I say?
    Close to nothing..., as I'm lost for words...
    Of course I enjoy watching the drone pictures from Trondheim, but looking at the Earths own artwork in those islands..., WOW!
    As I use to say to both J-O and C; I don't comment too much, but rest assured, I'm here watching..., sometimes with my mouth wide open

    Leave a comment:


  • yvneac
    replied
    WOW. What a thrill, Cecilia. Love your photos from these "secret" Irish islands. A special feeling for the gannets, maybe the more impressive birds when they swoop down.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied


    I love this view with Skellig Michael in the distance.







    This is an opportunity for close up views of the geology too.





    And so my dreams of seeing the Skellig Islands came true - and it was our dear Harald Jarl - Serenissima - that took me there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied



    Before we leave the islands, the captain is going to go past Little Skellig for a closer view, and the bird enthusiasts are estatic! - it has many seabirds but is particularly notable as being one of the largest colonies of the northern gannet.










    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied


    With that blocky rock wall now on the edge and the lighthouse central in the picture, the profile of the island begins to take on a more familiar aspect. The helicopter pad that we saw earlier is on the far right. The South Steps route to the monastery from the road leads up to the saddle, where it is visible on this photo.



    And so we've come full circle - though I've chosen this photo from earlier when the sun briefly illuminated the South Peak.

    And now we have a view of the monastery itself, the enclosing walls and beehive-shaped monks cells.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied


    In one unbelievable thrill after another I managed to capture a view of the upper disused lighthouse at the west side of the island!




    In this profile of the island from the south west, the upper lighthouse is on the left, about to go out of view, whilst the current lighthouse comes into view on the right, the former accommodation of the lighthouse keeper clearly visible. Serenissima has to carefully avoid the rocky skerry where the waves are breaking - a lovely view with Little Skellig in the distance.





    A little farther round, there's a magic moment as the sun highlights the steep wall of rock.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied


    Having now rounded the north east point of the island, the north side seems somewhat forbidding and even more precipitous, though the monks did have a route from this side to the saddle between the peaks.





    Serenissima continues at a safe distance, and looking back from the observation platform I am blest with this superb view with Little Skellig in a faint shaft of sunlight, and even clear views of the mainland peninsula beyond.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied



    As the ship starts to turn towards Skellig Michael, we see from the south east what is perhaps the most familiar profile of the island - a peak and the rounded shape which is where the main monastic buildings are. The monks constructed routes of rock-hewn and dry-stone steps to reach it, and I am starting to realise it is a more astonishing and incredible feat than I had imagined.
    The sense of spirituality and otherworldliness of this place is truly extraordinary.

    The Captain decides we can approach closer to the island, and will then attempt a circumnavigation!

    The maritime story of Great Skellig in the 19th century is also a fascinating one, From the base of the monks' East Steps a landing place and roadway was made. It slopes along the south side of the island, continuing to the west where two lighthouses were constructed. Some five years after the access and site work began, the lighthouses became operational in December 1826. The upper one was later discontinued and is now a ruin, but the other, with a tower from the late '60s, continues in use today, as an automatic unmanned light since 1981.




    And approach we did! How impressive is this! A wooden canopy protects the lighthouse road here at at Cross Cove, and there is a helicopter pad.

    Serenissima now begins a counter-clockwise circumnavigation i.e. to the right in first photo of this post, #1498/1, passing the landing place at the start of the road. This was constructed in the 1820s when the road was built, and replaced a lower series of steps from an original monks' landing place.





    As we head towards the rocks at the extreme right of #1498/1, we have a different profile of the island from this angle. You can clearly see where the lighthouse road begins at the landing place, called Blind Man's Cove. The monks' East Steps are not now used, although high above you can see that route's continuation at the side of the green swathe which leads around to the retaining walls, constructed terraces, and beehive shaped buildings which we will get a better view of later. From here without prior knowledge, the man-made monastic constructions and the natural rock are perhaps not so easily distinguishable!

    Leave a comment:

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