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ex HARALD JARL ::: ex ANDREA ::: SERENISSIMA :::

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  • Seagull
    commented on 's reply
    Yes good excuses to go on another cruise now that I've answered Ralf and Clipper's original queries!

  • pakarang
    replied
    Loved the images and thank you for your investigative report on the stabilisers use on board.

    The geeky side of me would have loved to know the length width and weight of the stabilisers and perhaps even more technical aspects. I can't believe I didn't ask so much about them when I was on board. Maybe I did, but my memory is really bad. Being just a 80-meter long ship, with a rather round hull, she is perhaps too small for stabilizers in many conditions?

    I'm sure a lot of technical engineers have run a lot of calculations on their size, effectiveness, and responsiveness.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied
    During this particular cruise, we encountered two rough sea situations where stabilisers would not be so effective. One was during the day, a scheduled "at sea" afternoon between Syracuse in Sicily and the Greek island of Kefalonia, with a strong wind in one direction - typical of parts of the Adriatic and eastern Mediterranean at this time of year. Even a lecture had to be cancelled! No going out on deck, but I did manage to take some photos from the cabin porthole.













    The other rough situation was during the first night on the ship, going from Barcelona to Sanary- sur-Mer on the French coast. I was woken when something of D's fell on the floor, and was surprised that the motion of the ship seemed greater than a weather announcement the previous evening might have suggested. For sure the ship was pitching rather a lot, but the waves didn't seem particularly high. Then I realised that, probably without stabilisers, I was experiencing something for the first time in my Serenissima voyages - the particular motion Harald Jarl used to have that Clipper has described as "the old roll-pitch-roll-yaw-shimmy"! Wow, she's remembered how to do it , In a geeky sort of way it was almost a highlight of my voyage!!!!!

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  • Seagull
    replied
    As you may have seen in the thread "Seagull away a while..." (#432 and #438), I have, recently and unexpectedly, accompanied D on a cruise aboard Serenissima, sailing from Barcelona to Bari in the Puglia region of Italy. I haven't even looked at all my photos yet, but before attemping a 'photos of and from the ship' type of trip report, there is a general topic that many of you are eager to hear more about - the stabilisers.

    Although the Captain was the same as on my previous two cruises, other deck officers were new to me. I'm still unsure who may actually have been new to the ship or whether the shifts of the Captain and others sometimes get out of phase. (This captain will now have his 4-months off, and it will be the other captain who will take the ship for her Indian Ocean season this winter).

    So me getting to know them, and they my special interest in the ship, perhaps slowed down my 'stabiliser fact-finding mission' - though I had various discussions and conclusions which I'll attempt to put together and summarise. But the short answer is that they are very pleased with them!

    In asking individuals how often and in what circumstances the stabilisers have typically been deployed, the length of their experience on the ship clearly influences their answer, as well as where they have sailed on her. Unlike a ship solely in Hurtigruten service along the Norwegian coast, Serenissima has, as you know, travelled the world in areas as diverse as the Arctic, the Baltic, the Mediterranean, the Atlantic ...and challenging crossings of the North Sea were mentioned! So although I heard of the stabilisers being deployed "two or three times during a cruise", the more overall view is that "in some areas they can be used most days".

    As for effectiveness - I was quoted "a 20-30% improvement".

    So they are generally used quite regularly, with guest comfort the top consideration - e.g. at night and during mealtimes. The proviso is "if there is time" because their use will slow down the ship.



    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    Naturally, a Panama Canal transit for me was a lot of work - first we had attend transit-planning meeting(s) in the days ahead, then we had to be up way before the pilot boarded early in the morning (mostly way before any birds got out of their nests farting /sunrise), then it was extremely long stand-by's and overlooking gangways, boarding parties, lines men, navigation, clearance (customs and immigration) and all that.

    These were extremely long days - and I did the canal for the first time as a deckhand, and finally as a Chief Officer Safety and Security.

    But - despite the long days, the canal was still as great as the best days of my life!

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied
    I was thinking a LOT about you on the Panama Canal, Pakarang - indeed, as I watched our 'canal-mate' Rotterdam I was also thinking about your different experiences of the canal on bigger ships. Smaller is amazing, and it is hard for me to imagine not being able to scamper around the decks, up and down, fore and aft, taking in all the views and experiences - I must have walked miles that day! Perhaps the only teeny advantage some guests on the Rotterdam may have had would have been the possibility of observing traffic in the new parallel Canal Expansion in some locations. But of course I had anticipated that and had taken the excursion to see it.


    Thank you so much all of you who have enjoyed this voyage. Mark, your lovely comment really touched me. ..but it may not be completely over, as there are many photos taken away from the coast on excursions that haven't appeared here on the ships thread. Animals and plants in the various nature reserves for example.

    But there is one excursion in particular - Day 3, that I would have already posted on the forum in the last couple of weeks had some computer issues not intervened. Puerto Chiapas in southern Mexico is very close to the offshore epicentre of the earthquakes that you will all have heard about in the news. As is often the case with earthquakes it is places further away that can be more affected, particularly amongst the buildings of larger towns and cities, and as far as I have been able to ascertain the local rural community around the banana plantation I visited are ok. I do intend to share with you the special experience of meeting the children at their school who have been much in my thoughts at what must have been a difficult time.

    I suppose it is only human nature that, when hearing of news of disasters and seeing reports in the media, it is those in places we have been that we feel most connection with and concern about. I have been very aware of that in the context of this voyage, for Serenissima, prior to returning to European waters, continued her travels to visit many islands in the Caribbean - places i have never been - that have since been affected, and in some cases devastated, by the series of hurricanes.

    Merely a day or so before all this news broke, a brochure of Serenissima's future plans for the winter season 2018/19 had arrived, and those itineraries include a Panama Canal crossing, thus taking in a return to some of the ports and places on the Pacific coast of Central American that I have featured here, as well as some Caribbean destinations. Perhaps fortunately, Serenissima is heading in a different direction this winter to the Indian Ocean.

    As I left the ship and took that last moody image at the port at Colón that February morning it seemed like a goodbye. I had no further booking in place, no plans for the future.
    But things happen…
    ...so keep an eye on that "Seagull Away a While" thread. Soon, very soon! ...like eh, how about SATURDAY!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    I find it overwhelmingly interesting and super-romantic that a coastal steamer from the cold coasts of Norway - a FORMER coastal steamer that is - has also sailed through the Panama Canal.

    I have crossed the canal back and forth more times than I have fingers and toes, but NEVER on a small ship as this.

    One thing that was also great to see is that you got down to the lowest open deck, and take a photo. This is something you just can't do on any of the (larger) cruise ships!

    Thank you so much for the PC-update!

    Leave a comment:


  • Clipper
    commented on 's reply
    Aha, transit markers! That makes sense, though I'm disappointed my guess wasn't correct. (It's an ego thing but I'm nearly over it already).

  • PoloUK
    replied
    Thanks for taking us with you Cecilia. This has been a remarkable series of photos, with the traditionally superb quality Seagull story telling. Sorry it's over!

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied
    Day 18 - 8th February 2017 - Colón, Panama.

    Serenissima had docked in Colón overnight, and soon after breakfast it was time to disembark, board the coaches, and again cross the isthmus, this time to the airport of Panama City and the flight home.



    My last image of this truly remarkable voyage.

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  • Seagull
    replied





    As the water level lowers, I notice we are shadows on the walls of the lock.




    Finally at sea-level, the lock gates open...




    ...and Serenissima leaves the canal.

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  • Seagull
    replied

    Looking back towards the lighthouse



    Rotterdam has now caught up in the other lane. The ship ahead of us, High Sun with home port Valletta, has exited the lower last chamber and is leaving the canal.



    Twelve minutes later we are nearly ready to enter the last chamber.

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  • ombugge
    commented on 's reply
    I have stayed mostly "East of Suez" and has been far out in the Pacific as Rarotonga, but never actually crossed the Pacific, (except by plane) or been in any ports on the west coast of the Americas by ship.
    Last edited by ombugge; September 15th, 2017, 14:13.

  • Seagull
    replied


    The gates open, and Serenissima moves forward into the next chamber.

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  • Seagull
    replied
    Look what's coming!




    We get a superb view of Rotterdam towering above us in the other lane.





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