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ex HARALD JARL ::: ex ANDREA ::: SERENISSIMA :::

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    I'll have photos in the "Postcards" thread at some point, but you get a preview of Bantry House gardens as they afforded lovely views of Serenissima at anchor.



    View looking over the East Stables.








    The north terrace




    My favourite photo. No need to take a selfie when this elegant lady and the ship can be pictured together!

    Comment


    • nari
      nari commented
      Editing a comment
      The old Harald Jahl design is still evident but she does look lovely and elegant.

    Originally posted by Seagull View Post
    Could help but notice the shy seagull hiding just behind the pier, away from Serenissima's reach.

    The ship looks so great from any angle she is seen, and so perfectly suited to her way of cruising where no mega-liners can go, with guests that have a genuine interest in the true feeling and history of a port or destination.
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


      The ship looks so great from any angle she is seen, and so perfectly suited to her way of cruising where no mega-liners can go, with guests that have a genuine interest in the true feeling and history of a port or destination.
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

      Comment


        Today, a 59 year old girl came back to her birth-town, Trondheim, Norway: 60 years ago, construction started on this beautiful vessel at Trondheim, and next year, it'll be 60 years since she started her career.

        I hope she will be in Trondheim on that very special day, in June 2020, on her 60th birthday, and that the city has some decency to show some respect for this ship on the day.

        2019_08_18 MAVIC2PRO-Serenissima-DJI_0266 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

        Comment


        • Seagull
          Seagull commented
          Editing a comment
          That's magnificent, pakarang, a completely different view of her and the city that you've been able to capture in glorious weather.
          She will call back in Trondheim next Saturday, but she won't be along the coast at all next year, as she is spending more time in the Faroes and Iceland.

        Thank you for the tips on this coming Saturday - I had missed that in the port cruise schedule. I'm not sure I will have time to go see her then, but these images will be a great memory for me already.

        I had no idea she would not be back for her 60th year anniversary - that's pity for Trondheim.

        I notice in these image, that there are two blocked off windows aft on the cafeteria deck.... do you, Lady C, have any idea why that is so?

        2019_08_18 MAVIC2PRO-Serenissima-DJI_0259 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

        2019_08_18 MAVIC2PRO-Serenissima-DJI_0263 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

        2019_08_18 MAVIC2PRO-Serenissima-DJI_0269 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

        2019_08_18 MAVIC2PRO-Serenissima-DJI_0271 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

        2019_08_18 MAVIC2PRO-Serenissima-DJI_0274 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

        2019_08_18 MAVIC2PRO-Serenissima-DJI_0278 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

        2019_08_18 MAVIC2PRO-Serenissima-DJI_0279 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

        Comment


          Originally posted by pakarang View Post
          ....I notice in these image, that there are two blocked off windows aft on the cafeteria deck.... do you, Lady C, have any idea why that is so?
          Yes I know about that ...it was the result of a docking incident in Stornoway on the trip I was on.The pier there seemed to me to be more appropriate for the large CalMac ferries or bigger flat-sided cruise ships than our little curvy Lady! We'd been tendering by zodiacs everywhere else, so I was watching activity on the foredeck and the guys ashore seemed slow with the lines. Then a commotion aft (which I couldn't see) when the pier structure hit those two windows. The glass was shattered i.e. crazed, but remaining in place as it's supposed to. I don't know whether the blocking off of the exterior of those windows as seen in your photos is a permanent or temporary arrangement.


          View towards the foredeck, to show you what the pier is like.


          View taken later after breakfast from the corner of the aft deck.


          Only able to get this view between two skips after I'd disembarked.


          One of the windows in the lounge.



          Comment


            Ok, thanks. I can see the "protruding" portholes back there might get caught in fenders of that type and nature.

            I believe they will have welded on steel plates in order to get permission by relevant maritime authorities to continue operating. Will probably have to be fixed on next visit to drydcok.
            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

            Comment


              Serenissima on a later visit back in the end of August.... August 24th 2019:

              2019_08_24 MAVIC2PRO-Serenissima-DJI_0319 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr

              2019_08_24 MAVIC2PRO-Serenissima-DJI_0321 by Captain Jan-Olav Storli, on Flickr
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

              Comment


              • Seagull
                Seagull commented
                Editing a comment
                Such a lovely image of the ship in Trondheim,with the still grey water, the green of Munkholmen, and the blueness of the land at the other side of the fjord.

              • nari
                nari commented
                Editing a comment
                Such a "pretty ship" and very graceful.

              Thank you so very much nari and Lady C!

              I particularly liked the way the second image came out, because of the propeller-wash. Kind of reminded me of all those thousands of miles of "keel water" that ship has produced all across the world within her more than 59 years of incredible service. That propeller has churned A LOT of water in the years.
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

              Comment


              • Clipper
                Clipper commented
                Editing a comment
                Great photos Carptain, and good thoughts about all those millions of kilometers of prop-wash. And yes, it is undoubtedly millions!

              Islands on the Edge - Day 5 - 7th May 2019 – Skellig Islands, County Kerry, Ireland

              I usually take my heading from that on the cruise daily information sheets, but this day was different!

              The ship's sheet heading referred to our next port of call on Valencia Island, saying that at 12:00 "MS Serenissima is expected to anchor off Knightstown on Valentia Island".
              But before that...
              "08:30 MS Serenissima is expected to approach the Skellig Islands" and suggested that in that case we should go out on deck "with camera and binoculars at the ready".

              I love this laconic understatement, the element of uncertainty. This is exactly how things should be - and are on this wonderful small ship.
              There seems to be a very different attitude on many big cruise ships these days, and I get really annoyed to see my annual travel insurance provider will even pay compensation "for each port stop shown on your cruise itinerary that is cancelled after your trip start date, for example because of bad weather". Arghhh, everywhere this 'compensation culture'; there can be no uncertainty, no disappointment (...and those of us who see things differently effectively end up paying for everyone else).

              But there was certainly no dissapointment that particular amazing morning.

              The Skelligs are two small rocky islands. They lie some 12 km off Bolus Head on the Iveragh Peninsula (the largest of those peninsulas that reach out into the Atlantic from the southwest of Ireland). But they seem more, much more, remote that that distance alone would suggest. Remote both in space and time.

              Little Skellig is the birds' island, while the larger Skellig Michael (also called Great Skellig) was one of those remote places sought out as hermitages and monastries in the early centuries when Celtic and Christian beliefs intertwined, and went on to become places of pilgrimage. The monastic buildings on Skellig Michael were probably constructed sometime between the 6th and 8th centuries, but seem worlds away from those on Iona in Scotland or Lindisfarne in England dating from that period.( So other-worldly as to even be familiar to "Star Wars" film buffs as an ancient Jedi temple!)


              I was up and about very early that Tuesday morning with the outside decks to myself. The skyscapes and light were changing continuously, and I remember thinking that I would never have been able to choose just one for a photo-a-day skyscape project on CaptainsVoyage!







              Comment



                2019-05-07-0619-35

                Leaving land behind, Serenissima continues on her already surreal journey of sky and sea…





                ...and passing increasingly improbable islands!




                Comment


                • Clipper
                  Clipper commented
                  Editing a comment
                  As you say Seagull, "increasingly improbable islands"!!!

                Only after those islands seemingly change shape as we adjust our course and leave them behind do I even realise I haven't thought about coffee yet this morning. I pop into the lounge where fresh coffee, tea, and buns have appeared, along with a few more early risers who have taken heed of the information sheet.





                Suitably refreshed, I decide to be on the bridge wing and it is from there I am rewarded with my first sight of the Skelligs...




                ...before relocating to the observation platform and, as we weave our way in response to wind and waves, edge ever closer to Little Skellig, its jagged profile flecked white by birds.







                Comment





                  As the ship starts to turn towards Skellig Michael, we see from the south east what is perhaps the most familiar profile of the island - a peak and the rounded shape which is where the main monastic buildings are. The monks constructed routes of rock-hewn and dry-stone steps to reach it, and I am starting to realise it is a more astonishing and incredible feat than I had imagined.
                  The sense of spirituality and otherworldliness of this place is truly extraordinary.

                  The Captain decides we can approach closer to the island, and will then attempt a circumnavigation!

                  The maritime story of Great Skellig in the 19th century is also a fascinating one, From the base of the monks' East Steps a landing place and roadway was made. It slopes along the south side of the island, continuing to the west where two lighthouses were constructed. Some five years after the access and site work began, the lighthouses became operational in December 1826. The upper one was later discontinued and is now a ruin, but the other, with a tower from the late '60s, continues in use today, as an automatic unmanned light since 1981.




                  And approach we did! How impressive is this! A wooden canopy protects the lighthouse road here at at Cross Cove, and there is a helicopter pad.

                  Serenissima now begins a counter-clockwise circumnavigation i.e. to the right in first photo of this post, #1498/1, passing the landing place at the start of the road. This was constructed in the 1820s when the road was built, and replaced a lower series of steps from an original monks' landing place.





                  As we head towards the rocks at the extreme right of #1498/1, we have a different profile of the island from this angle. You can clearly see where the lighthouse road begins at the landing place, called Blind Man's Cove. The monks' East Steps are not now used, although high above you can see that route's continuation at the side of the green swathe which leads around to the retaining walls, constructed terraces, and beehive shaped buildings which we will get a better view of later. From here without prior knowledge, the man-made monastic constructions and the natural rock are perhaps not so easily distinguishable!

                  Comment




                    Having now rounded the north east point of the island, the north side seems somewhat forbidding and even more precipitous, though the monks did have a route from this side to the saddle between the peaks.





                    Serenissima continues at a safe distance, and looking back from the observation platform I am blest with this superb view with Little Skellig in a faint shaft of sunlight, and even clear views of the mainland peninsula beyond.

                    Comment




                      In one unbelievable thrill after another I managed to capture a view of the upper disused lighthouse at the west side of the island!




                      In this profile of the island from the south west, the upper lighthouse is on the left, about to go out of view, whilst the current lighthouse comes into view on the right, the former accommodation of the lighthouse keeper clearly visible. Serenissima has to carefully avoid the rocky skerry where the waves are breaking - a lovely view with Little Skellig in the distance.





                      A little farther round, there's a magic moment as the sun highlights the steep wall of rock.

                      Comment


                      • Clipper
                        Clipper commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Truly great picture Cecilia!!!! Islands I have never even heard of.

                        For anyone who enjoys "troll-hunting" #1498-2 and #1500-1 provide some rich rock formations.
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