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  • Steve.B
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
    Will comment on earlier posts later, but at the moment there are 10 ROV's online, none showing any plumes. I think the test is underway. Fingers crossed.
    Over an hour in and still no plumes, just been looking at No 2 ROV from the Skandi, perfect view of the whole capping stack without any oil or gas venting! Have also noticed that the text in the ROV screen has changed from 'Plume Monitoring', to 'Stack Monitoring'.

    So the capping stack seems to be able to handle the pressure, let's just hope the well casing below the seabed can also do so.

    A very good sight from Skandi number 2 ROV.
    Last edited by Steve.B; July 15th, 2010, 23:03.

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  • Steve.B
    replied
    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
    I thought I'll just show what a ROV Control Panel look like. Especially for Steve, who may aspire to become a ROV Pilot after all the hours he has spent watching how they are operated.
    Impressive control stations, i should imagine that it takes a very long time to become a good operator. Lots of intense concentration needed. Do i see foot controls under the desk also? Must be strange not being able to actually feel the responses to the controls, piloting a plane, helicopter, or even just driving a car you can feel the vehicle responding to your inputs. Must be like loosing one of your senses in a way. The crew operating these ROV's seem to make it look so easy, very experienced people indeed. Like Ombugge said, probably some of the best operators in the world.

    Good to see the photos of the control stations, thank you for posting. I must admit it would be interesting to have a go on one, but somehow i don't think they let just anybody play with their multi-million dollar toys, well not without many hours of training in a simulator first.

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  • Steve.B
    replied
    Here is a short video showing the capping stack.

    http://bp.concerts.com/gom/riser_cap...ack_070110.htm

    The capping stack.

    Photo copyright BP PLC

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  • Steve.B
    replied
    Will comment on earlier posts later, but at the moment there are 10 ROV's online, none showing any plumes. I think the test is underway. Fingers crossed.

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  • wherrygirl
    replied
    What are your thoughts on the use of dispersants, Ombugge? There was a brief discussion on the news yesterday on the immense ecological damage it can do, especially used on the scale it would be in this case. I've been keeping up with your and Steve's postings on Deepwater and occasionally watching the ROV's (good to see your photos, by the way) and I know that you have several times emphasised that in time the oil would naturally degrade and marine life return to normal.

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  • ombugge
    replied
    I thought I'll just show what a ROV Control Panel look like. Especially for Steve, who may aspire to become a ROV Pilot after all the hours he has spent watching how they are operated.

    ROV 1 Operating Panel on board CSV "Normand Clough":


    ROV 2 Operating Panel:


    In this case they are in the same room, but facing in opposite direction to avoid too much interference, yet be able to communicate directly, if required.

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  • ombugge
    replied
    I have taken over the "duty" from Steve to watch the events as they happens.
    Right now not much appears to be happening actually. I'm watching Skandi Neptune ROV 2 watching ROV 1 spraying dispersant into the oil plume, which is still coming out through one side vent.

    Olympic Challenger ROV 1 is watching the inlet pressure slowly rise, which may indicate that they are doing something.

    If nothing else, they should be able to run a riser down and connect to the top of the new 3-ram stack to divert all the flow to surface in a controlled manner, where it can be distributed to the three vessels with processing facilities, said to be sufficient to cater for whatever is coming out of the wellbore.

    I'll be watching for a while longer.

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  • Steve.B
    replied
    So the test is well underway, been keeping one eye on proceedings over the last couple of hours. Been nothing venting from the top of the stack for a long time now. Looks like they have the flow venting from one side only now - was coming out of both sides a while ago. At the moment i would say they have the full flow of the well coming out that one vent, it's a very large plume.

    Would be nice to wake up to a plume free stack in the morning.

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  • ombugge
    replied
    A quick look at Enterprise ROV 1 feed and it appears that this ROV is just holding on to the earlier "Cap" at a depth of something like 4350 ft.
    I don't know why this hasn't been pulled to surface, but maybe it is just stand by for re-use if the present operation should fail.
    (To pull and re-run 5000 ft. of riser takes quite some time, even with quick connecting riser)

    The Enterprise is disconnected and bound to have moved somewhat off structure to allow all this activity to take place.

    From the Skandi Neptune ROV 2 it appears that there is no reduction in the oil that escapes as yet. Not surprising if they haven't started to close off the wellbore yet.

    It will be interesting to see when they actually start to shut in this well, how it will behave and what pressure will be obtained in the wellbore.
    If the pressure build up close to the estimated rupture pressure of the large top casing, they will need to be quick to open the rams again, and maybe re-set the original Cap, but this time on top of the new 3-ram stack.

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  • Steve.B
    replied
    I am trying to work out what Enterprise ROV1 is doing, or what exactly it's looking at. It looks like a very large piece of their equipment is totally covered in some sort of debris, at first i thought the ROV was looking for something on the seabed, but then i could see that it's actually trying to clear a thick layer of loose debris from something. Where could all of this mess come from?, it's been so clear down there until now. Unless it's rooting around amongst some old debris from the initial disaster.

    I have also just heard on the news that testing of the well is now on hold for the time being. No explanation yet why the test is delayed. Hope it's nothing to do with the mess that i have seen on the ROV footage.

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  • Steve.B
    replied
    I guess the next few hours will let us know if they can shut it down or not. Looking at Skandi Nuptune's No2 ROV and there is still oil and gas venting through the top outlet of the sealing cap. After listening to the latest tech update, that flow from the top of the cap will stop once they start the pressure testing, flow will be diverted to the side outlets, they will then close each one of those down in turn.

    If the pressure builds, and then stays at a high level when they close the last ram, then hopefully all will be good. If the pressure fails to build, or starts to drop off, then obviously there is a containment problem somewhere else in the well. If that was the case they would be opening those rams up again rather sharpish, just in case the oil and gas was making it's way to the surface by some other route.

    It sounds like pressure readings of 6000 PSI would not be good, a reading like that would indicate a breach somewhere, but a steady pressure above 8000 PSI would be a good indicator. A reading between the two would have them concerned enough not to keep the well shut off from the top.

    Lets hope they get good high and consistent pressures when they close those rams.

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  • pilotdane
    replied
    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
    Hopefully they will be able to close the rams and shut off the flow entirely, or at least they will be able to all the oil and gas to surface in a controlled manner, where it can be processed, provided they have enough processing capacity to handle the flow and enough storage capacity to handle it between shipment to shore.
    I hope they get it capped before a hurricane heads their way. It would be a huge delay for everyone to get out of the way of the storm and then come back and start work again.

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  • ombugge
    replied
    Thanks for that link Steve. I have been watching the way they are operating the ROV Manipulator arm to handle thing and I think they must have assemble just about the most skilled and experienced ROV Pilots available on this project. Last year I sat on a boat and watch a ROV like this trying to put a bolt into a shackle at 1200 something meter WD. It took 10 hours of dropped bolts and failed attempts, until change of shift. The next ROV Pilot put the bolt in place in less than 1/2 hr. At an Opex of around USD 1.0 Mill./day, those 10 hours got fairly expensive.

    I have been working around subsea cameras and ROVs since all we got to see was some grainy black and white pictures. Here we see clear colour pictures as sharp as can be. One more thing that strikes me is the lack of plankton in the water. Usually the picture get blurred by small marine organisms, even at large depth, or the ROV gets too close to bottom and stir up mud, which can make for Zero visibility for quite some time.

    It is also noticeable that there are no current to speak of at this location. That can be seen from the way the ROV are sitting nearly stationary, without having to use one manipulator arm to hang on to something. (You can see the special rails on some of the equipment designed for this purpose)

    Last but not least, to manage all these ROVs, working in close proximity, but from different vessels on surface and without getting the various umbilicals tangle up, is also an impressive feath. Usually each ROV is lowered down to near where it is supposed to work in it's own Garage. Only then does it swim out of the Garage, but tethered to the garage by the umbilical at all times. There must be a lot of such Garages hanging in the water all around this Well head.

    Hopefully they will be able to close the rams and shut off the flow entirely, or at least they will be able to all the oil and gas to surface in a controlled manner, where it can be processed, provided they have enough processing capacity to handle the flow and enough storage capacity to handle it between shipment to shore.

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  • Steve.B
    replied
    Seeing what each ROV is doing at a glance!
    http://www.bp.com/sectionbodycopy.do...tentId=7063636

    BP have now updated their ROV page, previews of each ROV's video stream are now shown on one page. See above link.

    Saves searching through them all to find the more interesting operations.

    EDIT: I have just found out that if you have a slow broadband connection then the new page is a total nightmare, all your bandwidth is taken up by the preview panes. Now when i click on a particular ROV i cannot watch the feed unless i totally close the window with all the preview panes on it!
    Last edited by Steve.B; July 13th, 2010, 02:49.

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  • Steve.B
    replied
    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
    The formal / legal terminology is; "The vessel took up an attitude of negative buoyancy".

    In everyday terms it is; "She f....ing well sunk".
    (I wonder if that will pass the sensor??)




    Have you all been following the progress back at the incident site in the GOM?
    They have started the procedure to fit the sealing cap on the well.

    Have a look at this tech briefing on what they are doing, very interesting stuff.

    BP Tech briefing animation.

    I have wondered how they were going to manage to undo the large nuts and bolts that hold the current flange on stack, i have just been looking at the ROV that's doing that particular job, it seems to be using an hydraulic wrench that fits over the nut, with the main body of the tool wedged against the flange. A simple, but very affective way to release the bolts.

    I still think it's brilliant we can watch all of this live.

    EDIT: Looks like they use the hydraulic wrench to loosen the bolts, then the ROV unscrews it with it's claws.

    Not sure how long it will be on station with this particular job, but this is the link to the ROV. Here.
    Last edited by Steve.B; July 11th, 2010, 03:17.

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