Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Deepwater Horizon

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #46
    "A Whale" is in the Gulf to try to help with oil cleanup.

    http://news.sympatico.ctv.ca/home/co...skimmer-100703

    http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2010/...2501278255438/

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38047155...r_in_the_gulf/
    Last edited by Remarc; July 4th, 2010, 19:37.

    Comment


      #47
      Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
      I don't know if it made the world news but in the USA a child was killed when hit on the head with a baseball hit by an aluminum bat. The manufacturer of the bat, Louisville Slugger, was liable for the child's injury because they did not properly warn about the dangers of the bat.

      http://www.usatoday.com/sports/baseb...-lawsuit_N.htm
      Well that really beats all.
      Ivy

      "To thine own self be true.......
      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

      Comment


        #48
        Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
        Ah, but this is the United States where accidents do not exist. Yes, accidents do happen but someone is always at fault and someone always gets sued.

        I don't know if it made the world news but in the USA a child was killed when hit on the head with a baseball hit by an aluminum bat. The manufacturer of the bat, Louisville Slugger, was liable for the child's injury because they did not properly warn about the dangers of the bat. I am quite surprised that the manufacturer of the ball did not also get sued.

        http://www.usatoday.com/sports/baseb...-lawsuit_N.htm
        Court rulings like that can only pave the way for other crazy claims.

        So lets say you run a small engineering firm that produces high lift camshafts, you know, the sort that boy racers like to stick in their suped up street cars to make them go faster. I am guessing it might be wise to include a warning with each camshaft clearly stating that...............

        "Fitting this performance camshaft in your car could seriously increase the risk of you crashing your car at a higher speed than you would have normally obtained in your car, prior to fitting our performance camshaft."
        Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

        Comment


          #49
          Originally posted by ombugge View Post
          ...I'm NOT anti-American...
          You do not have to explain, apologize or even think about it.

          Comment


            #50
            Interesting video......

            http://www.wimp.com/oilspills

            Comment


              #51
              Originally posted by Remarc View Post
              Interesting video......

              http://www.wimp.com/oilspills

              Now that is an interesting find Remarc, i for one have not heard about this 1979 incident, not that i can remember anyway.

              I am not sure i agree with the news reporter when she say's no advancement have been made in the way disasters like this are dealt with, 1979 incident in 600 foot of water, back then it took them 9 months to bring the well under control.
              2010 incident happened in 5000 feet of water, and if all goes to plan with the relief well - and all indications are pointing to just that, then this well will be brought under control in under half the time of the 1979 incident. I think that is classed as progress.

              Good to see that video.
              Last edited by Steve.B; July 7th, 2010, 16:48.
              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

              Comment


                #52
                I have just been reading a little bit about the 1979 Ixtoc spill, umm.................................here is a little quote from the wiki article........

                Normally, this flow can be stopped by activating shear rams contained in the blowout preventer (BOP). These rams are designed to sever and seal off the well on the ocean floor; however in this case the drill collars had been brought in line with the BOP and the BOP rams were not able to sever the thick steel walls of the drill collars leading to a catastrophic blowout.


                Now doesn't that also sound familiar???

                Wiki article concerning the Ixtoc incident...

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtoc_I_oil_spill
                Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                Comment


                  #53
                  What exactly is Mighty Servant 3 doing in this picture?

                  http://www.bp.com/liveassets/bp_inte...ty_servant.jpg

                  She is fully on the surface and oil booms extend to her stern. It looks like they have built a small lagoon/lake on her deck and there are six hydraulic excavators surrounding the lagoon. Are they separating water and oil? I cannot figure out why they need so many excavators on deck?

                  Comment


                    #54
                    Interesting set up!

                    This tells you a little about her role in the clean up.

                    http://www.marinelog.com/DOCS/NEWSMM...0jun00180.html

                    Why so many long reach excavators? Guess it saves a lot of tracking up and down that massive deck.
                    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                    Comment


                      #55
                      Thank you for the link. That explains it all.

                      Did you know that if you Google search videos for Mighty Servant 3 you get nothing but religious stuff, and on Youtube the first reference to the ship is at the bottom of page 8.

                      This video shows some of her machinery spaces.

                      Comment


                        #56
                        She looks brand new, so i am guessing that the video was shot shortly after re-entering service, or even during recommissioning following her slight mishap back in 2006. You must admit she is looking very good for a vessel that decided she wanted to sit on the seafloor in 62m of water!

                        Our thread for that incident from the old forum, Here.

                        And a few pictures of her going down, Here.
                        Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
                          She looks brand new, so i am guessing that the video was shot shortly after re-entering service, or even during recommissioning following her slight mishap back in 2006. You must admit she is looking very good for a vessel that decided she wanted to sit on the seafloor in 62m of water!
                          The formal / legal terminology is; "The vessel took up an attitude of negative buoyancy".

                          In everyday terms it is; "She f....ing well sunk".
                          (I wonder if that will pass the sensor??)

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Originally posted by ombugge View Post
                            The formal / legal terminology is; "The vessel took up an attitude of negative buoyancy".

                            In everyday terms it is; "She f....ing well sunk".
                            (I wonder if that will pass the sensor??)




                            Have you all been following the progress back at the incident site in the GOM?
                            They have started the procedure to fit the sealing cap on the well.

                            Have a look at this tech briefing on what they are doing, very interesting stuff.

                            BP Tech briefing animation.

                            I have wondered how they were going to manage to undo the large nuts and bolts that hold the current flange on stack, i have just been looking at the ROV that's doing that particular job, it seems to be using an hydraulic wrench that fits over the nut, with the main body of the tool wedged against the flange. A simple, but very affective way to release the bolts.

                            I still think it's brilliant we can watch all of this live.

                            EDIT: Looks like they use the hydraulic wrench to loosen the bolts, then the ROV unscrews it with it's claws.

                            Not sure how long it will be on station with this particular job, but this is the link to the ROV. Here.
                            Last edited by Steve.B; July 11th, 2010, 03:17.
                            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                            Comment


                              #59
                              Seeing what each ROV is doing at a glance!
                              http://www.bp.com/sectionbodycopy.do...tentId=7063636

                              BP have now updated their ROV page, previews of each ROV's video stream are now shown on one page. See above link.

                              Saves searching through them all to find the more interesting operations.

                              EDIT: I have just found out that if you have a slow broadband connection then the new page is a total nightmare, all your bandwidth is taken up by the preview panes. Now when i click on a particular ROV i cannot watch the feed unless i totally close the window with all the preview panes on it!
                              Last edited by Steve.B; July 13th, 2010, 02:49.
                              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                              Comment


                                #60
                                Thanks for that link Steve. I have been watching the way they are operating the ROV Manipulator arm to handle thing and I think they must have assemble just about the most skilled and experienced ROV Pilots available on this project. Last year I sat on a boat and watch a ROV like this trying to put a bolt into a shackle at 1200 something meter WD. It took 10 hours of dropped bolts and failed attempts, until change of shift. The next ROV Pilot put the bolt in place in less than 1/2 hr. At an Opex of around USD 1.0 Mill./day, those 10 hours got fairly expensive.

                                I have been working around subsea cameras and ROVs since all we got to see was some grainy black and white pictures. Here we see clear colour pictures as sharp as can be. One more thing that strikes me is the lack of plankton in the water. Usually the picture get blurred by small marine organisms, even at large depth, or the ROV gets too close to bottom and stir up mud, which can make for Zero visibility for quite some time.

                                It is also noticeable that there are no current to speak of at this location. That can be seen from the way the ROV are sitting nearly stationary, without having to use one manipulator arm to hang on to something. (You can see the special rails on some of the equipment designed for this purpose)

                                Last but not least, to manage all these ROVs, working in close proximity, but from different vessels on surface and without getting the various umbilicals tangle up, is also an impressive feath. Usually each ROV is lowered down to near where it is supposed to work in it's own Garage. Only then does it swim out of the Garage, but tethered to the garage by the umbilical at all times. There must be a lot of such Garages hanging in the water all around this Well head.

                                Hopefully they will be able to close the rams and shut off the flow entirely, or at least they will be able to all the oil and gas to surface in a controlled manner, where it can be processed, provided they have enough processing capacity to handle the flow and enough storage capacity to handle it between shipment to shore.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X