Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

World's TUGBOATS

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #46
    Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
    I have spent way too much time looking at those two links. I just wish the line drawings were in higher resolution. I'd love to see the interior layout of engineering spaces and living quarters.
    This link to Voit in N.America may interest you:
    http://www.us.voithturbo.com/vt_en_p...spropeller.htm

    And here is a link to a video from a VS Escort Tug operating in Valdez, Alaska:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyjPKPdJbWs

    And this is the "classification" of tugs commonly used in N.America:


    In addition there is;
    AHT (Anchor Handling Tugs):


    Anchor Handling Tug Supply vessels (AHTS):


    Ocean Going Tugs, (for long range towage):

    This is the South African tugs "John Ross and "Wolraad Woltemade" (better known as; "the otherone with the difficult name")
    For manyyears known as the worlds biggest tugs, at 20,000 Hp / 220 t. BP, but not any more.

    Here is the presently biggest tug in the world,; Far Samson, 423 m.t. BP:


    Salvage Tugs:

    (Combined Salvage, Ocean Towage and AHTS)

    A number of other terms are also being used to describe "Tugs" of various types and for different purposes.

    Meanwhile I'll see if I have some pics from the Engine Room and accommodations on local Tractor Tugs.

    Maybe these last posts should be moved to the Tug Boat thread???

    Comment


      #47
      Originally posted by janihudi View Post
      i didn`t know this at that time of taking this picture,but this is the tug DE DA .

      yes the same that towed the SS NORWAY out of bremerhaven to her end.

      the "SMIT ELBE" for the headoffice of mammoet





      best regards Thijs

      Comment


        #48
        Boxer & DUX in Bergen



        View more photo's at my Flickr photostream blog

        Comment


          #49
          Thank you for the links.

          I really like the tractor tug link in Valdez, Alaska. I just wish it were an hour long show instead of a minute long video.

          Comment


            #50
            Quite amazing to see this collection of tug from all across the world come together. Certainly a very diverse group of work vessels.
            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

            Comment


              #51
              Tug & Salvage Magazine

              Here is a link that may be of interest to those who cannot get enough of tugs and salvage operations: https://www.tugandsalvage.com/Magazine_Home.asp
              It is available free on line, 6 issues per year. Back issues are available.

              Comment


                #52
                Here are some tugs I have visited during the last few weeks.

                Starting with the smallest, Swiber Phoenix, 1800 Bhp/20 t. BP/ Loa 23 m.:




                Getting ready to tow the KAKAP SPM from Batam to Kakap Field, Natuna Sea, Indonesia:

                Comment


                  #53
                  The next one up is the AHT/Utility vessel Swissco Swift, 2400 Bhp /32 t. BP/Loa 32 m. Being prepared for sale to a Middle Eastern buyer:






                  Single drum towing winch:

                  Comment


                    #54
                    This one is actually a AHTS, but has spent here first few months since delivery from China towing the same barge around for the Montara Project.
                    AHTS GO Acamar, 5150 Bhpp / 65 t. BP / Loa 57.8 m.:


                    The Pakarang view:




                    Comment


                      #55
                      And a near identical sister, Swiber Sandefjord, 5000 Bhp / 63 t.BP / 58.7 m.:


                      Some "action pictures"; Hooking up and ready to tow AWB Swiber Glorious from Singapore to the Kakap Field, Natuna Sea, Indonesia:






                      Tow line connected:


                      Gog arrangement installed:

                      Comment


                        #56
                        The next size up is Britoil 41, 11,000 Bhp / 136 t. BP / Loa 60 m. Heading for Australia to tow an FPSO back to Singapore for upgrading:


                        Near Pakarang view:


                        The .... end view:


                        View of the deck from Wheel house:


                        The aft controls:


                        And the Fwrd. controls:

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Now we get up into the big boat class. Tug "Rotterdam", ex. Smit Rotterdam, ex. Smitwijs Rotterdam, a grand old lady of Ocean Towage, built in Holland, 1975. 13,500 Bhp / 162 t. BP / Loa 75 m.:

                          Looking good for her age doesn't she?? But like most old ladies, with the help of some fresh paint and a face lift.



                          View of the deck from the new aft controls:

                          This is a true Oceangoing/Salvage TUG not a combined anything.
                          She was heading to India to tow a damaged rig from Mumbai to Dubai.

                          Comment


                            #58
                            And finally, the "Super Tug" Fairmount Alpine, built in Japan in 2006, 16,000 Bhp / 200 t. BP / Loa 75 m.:

                            Getting ready to go to Korea for the tow of a large FPSO from there to Rio de Janeiro, via Cape together with her identical sister tug, Fairmount Expedition.

                            Colourful isn't she?:


                            The near Pakarang view:






                            Deck viewed from the Wheel house, aft controls:


                            And some interior pics from the Wheel House,
                            Aft controls and winch control panel:


                            Fwrd controls:






                            I have a lot more pics from these tugs, but that will have to wait for another day.

                            Comment


                              #59
                              Originally posted by ombugge View Post
                              Here is a link that may be of interest to those who cannot get enough of tugs and salvage operations: https://www.tugandsalvage.com/Magazine_Home.asp
                              It is available free on line, 6 issues per year. Back issues are available.
                              Thank you. Something new for my "favorites" folder.

                              Comment


                                #60
                                Originally posted by ombugge View Post
                                And finally, the "Super Tug" Fairmount Alpine, built in Japan in 2006, 16,000 Bhp / 200 t. BP / Loa 75 m.:
                                Now that is how I would paint a tug. You would see me coming.

                                I notice that everything is written in English. In aviation English is the required language most everywhere in the world. Are ships also required to use English? Can many of the crew read the "safety first" signs?

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X