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    #31
    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
    The Barge in tow is probably destined for some fish farm, where it will be permanently moored and used as storage for feed stuff etc. Maybe even slaughtering and packing facilities.
    They even have office and living quarters on this one by the look of the house.

    Old Car Ferries used to be popular for this purpose, as seen in another thread earlier. Maybe they run out of suitable ferries?
    From what I can see, I also think it's made from concrete... ?
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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      #32
      Originally posted by pakarang View Post
      From what I can see, I also think it's made from concrete... ?
      Yes, very likely................................

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        #33
        Anchor Handling Tugs (AHT)

        Here is another type of tug, which is widely used in the Offshore industry to tow an support Construction Barges, Crane Barges, Pipe Laying Barges etc. in areas like S.E.Asia, Middle East, West Africa and GOM among others.
        Usually from 3-6,000 Bhp but up to 10,000 Bhp does exist.

        Here is a couple of typical China newbuilt AHT of 4,400 Bhp / 52 t. BP / Loa 45 m.:



        (Sisters available for sale if anybody is interested)

        This is AHT "Britoil 37", 5000 Bhp /75 t. BP, Built 1999 in China, but Norwegian design and equipment.
        View of Bridge and Winch from aft deck:


        Chain/Wire Stopper (Shark Jaws) and Guide Pins are Ulstein: (200 t. SWL)


        Towing/ Anchor Handling Winch is from Brattvaag Hydraulic: (75 t. pull/140t. Brake Holding)

        (In process of changing Tow Wire)

        This is AHT "Britoil 63", 5400 Bhp / 85 t. BP, Built China 2005:


        Work deck and winch arrangement: (Brattvaag Hydraulic 75 t. pull/ 140 t. Brake)


        2 x KarmFork Chain/Wire Stoppers w/lockable Guide Pins: (200 t. SWL)


        Aft controls in the Wheel house:

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          #34
          AHT Cont'd

          Here is an older and much smaller AHT/Utility vessel, Laut Barat (Western Sea), 1,710 Bhp/16 t. BP, Loa 38 m. Built S'pore 1983.

          View of Superstructure and massive funnels w/FiFi Gantry:


          Manual Guide/Tow pins:

          (No shark jaws. Still using Pelican Hook as stopper)

          Jump Platform on either side at Stern:

          (For personnel transfer to/from platforms by swing ropes)

          Single drum Towing / Anchor handling Winch: (50 t. pull)

          Guard protecting Winch motor.


          Aft Controls:

          (In the "Bird Cage" behind Stbd. funnel)

          View of Work Deck from aft Control house:


          MultiCat AHT/Utility, used for anchor handling in shallow estuaries and river deltas:


          I have a lot of pics from shallow water operations with all kinds of "strange" boats and barges, but mostly in print, which needs to be scanned before it can be put on CV. Next
          Last edited by ombugge; September 1st, 2009, 13:29. Reason: Added pics

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            #35
            Nice pictures from Tromsøysundet, as always!

            This is not about tugs, but I know what I would've done have I lived in Tromsø right now.
            Over at Skjelnan, "Saturnus" has left her dockplace to the docking "Bit Viking".
            Two very nice looking tankers in the same pictureframe, maybe....
            Well, Bengt...., your call...
            "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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              #36




              best regards Thijs

              Comment


                #37
                I notice that the ITC tug Sumatras is still sporting the Tzudi & Eitzen funnel, although that company was broken up some years back.

                I have worked with many ITC tugs over the years. They are among the pioneers in the business of long range towing.

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                  #38
                  Originally posted by Asimut
                  T/B "Chanko" on her way south on Tromsøysundet this afternoon.

                  T/B "Chanko" is a very good tug I've been working on it

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Hunter







                    Here Photo`s from the Hunter.
                    Owner: Rederij Noordgat West Terschelling (The Netherlands)
                    Harlingen 19-9-2009


                    Length 39.40 m
                    Breadth 9.50 m
                    Depth 4.40 m

                    Draught 3.50 m
                    Bollard Pull 40 tons

                    Engine Power 3,300 bhp
                    Speed 14 knots
                    Gross tonnage 373 tons

                    Class notation LR + 100 A1 Tug / +LMC / UMS / Iceclass 2
                    Bunker capacity 130 m3
                    Radius of action 10,000 NM at 10 knots
                    Accommodation 2x 1 and 4x 2 cabins
                    Facilities Pushbow fitted
                    Towinghook 40 tons SWL
                    Double drum 30 ton towing winch with breakhold 70 tons
                    2 x 500 meter 44 mm steel towing line
                    Rope recovery winch
                    Hydraulic towing pins + stern roller
                    Mobile fire fighting equipment
                    Mobile salvage pumps
                    Hydraulic knuckle crane 12 t/m (1,5 tons at 9m)

                    Regards Germen
                    Last edited by Germen; September 30th, 2009, 19:36.

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                      #40
                      T/B "Polar Tug" in shipyard in Sandnessjoen

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                        #41
                        Thank you for the tug drydock photos. It's interesting to notice the strakes/vanes on the keel I assume to straighten out the flow entering the porp. With such a round bottom I bet she would roll quite a bit without a HUGE engine down low.

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                          #42
                          T/B "Polar Tug" and T/B "Chanko"

                          Comment


                            #43
                            Tug Boat Power...

                            I have a question:

                            How does the tug-boat skipper knows if his tug, is not delivering enough power during 'piloting' activities?

                            Can he 'sense' if there is no or opposed movement during 'piloting activities' within the berths/wharfs?

                            Is it totally the responsibility of 'pilots' to oversee all of the main ship movement until it is safely put to sea?

                            Comment


                              #44
                              I don't know if I understand correctly, but I'll try to answer your question as I understand them:

                              Originally posted by Thyristor View Post
                              I have a question:
                              How does the tug-boat skipper knows if his tug, is not delivering enough power during 'piloting' activities?
                              If by this you mean whether he is using enough power at any given time, the answer is; he takes instructions from the Harbour Pilot and should NOT make his own judgment as to what is required. If not enough he will be told to increase power, and v.v.

                              Can he 'sense' if there is no or opposed movement during 'piloting activities' within the berths/wharfs?
                              In most case the Tug skipper cannot see the wharf, but he can most likely see or "feel" the movement of the vessel, and whether there are opposing forces - say from current, or from other tugs working against him - but the same applies, he takes order to push or pull, in which direction and how much power to apply, from the Pilot.

                              Is it totally the responsibility of 'pilots' to oversee all of the main ship movement until it is safely put to sea?
                              Ultimate authority and responsibility for maneuvering the ship in port remains with the Master, whether he has a Pilot on board or not. In most ports pilotage is compulsory.
                              In practice, the Pilot give all orders, however, as long as the Master doesn't object.

                              Coming in to Keppel Shipyard with a small ship one time with a young and inexperienced Pilot on board, I had to take over as we would otherwise have run into the closed dock gate at King's Dock. That is the prerogative of the Master, but doesn't happen very often.
                              He had trained on big tankers berthing at Pulau Bukom and did not entirely understand the difference with handling a small but relatively powerful ship.

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Recording of instructions...

                                Originally posted by ombugge View Post
                                I don't know if I understand correctly, but I'll try to answer your question as I understand them:



                                If by this you mean whether he is using enough power at any given time, the answer is; he takes instructions from the Harbour Pilot and should NOT make his own judgment as to what is required. If not enough he will be told to increase power, and v.v.



                                In most case the Tug skipper cannot see the wharf, but he can most likely see or "feel" the movement of the vessel, and whether there are opposing forces - say from current, or from other tugs working against him - but the same applies, he takes order to push or pull, in which direction and how much power to apply, from the Pilot.



                                Ultimate authority and responsibility for maneuvering the ship in port remains with the Master, whether he has a Pilot on board or not. In most ports pilotage is compulsory.
                                In practice, the Pilot give all orders, however, as long as the Master doesn't object.

                                Coming in to Keppel Shipyard with a small ship one time with a young and inexperienced Pilot on board, I had to take over as we would otherwise have run into the closed dock gate at King's Dock. That is the prerogative of the Master, but doesn't happen very often.
                                He had trained on big tankers berthing at Pulau Bukom and did not entirely understand the difference with handling a small but relatively powerful ship.
                                All of my questions had been answered...my sincere appreciations to you, Ombugge..

                                I think, the amount of (your) experience says it all....

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