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    #16
    Followed by the Maju 4, built in late 1970s, 3200 Bhp/ 40 t. BP:

    Waiting together with other tugs at Keppel Benoi Shipyard.

    Bow Fender of a smaller size:


    The Wheel House:


    (A bit more worn and less sophisticated then the Maju Star)

    View of the aft deck from the Wheel House:


    Forward Towing Winch:

    Tow Hook (No aft winch on this tug):

    (The Quick release obviously didn't pass muster at first go)

    One of the Main Engines:


    I delivered three tugs of this same type from S'pore to East Africa in 1974.
    The first one I sailed myself but I hired a captain to deliver the next two.

    Sorry, not much interior pics here as this was a Suitability Survey for a towage operation, but I have plenty pics from other tugs, some of which may make you change your mind about joining a small tug for more than a few hours.

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      #17
      Originally posted by ombugge View Post
      Since you cannot come to Singapore just to spend a day on a tug, the tug will have to come to you, at last by some pics from two Harbour Tugs, one nearly new and one old.

      Voit Schneider propulsion?
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

      Comment


        #18
        Thank you for these detailed views on a tug boat! Fascinating.
        Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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          #19
          Thank you very much for the incredible tug pictures! Now I have to get myself to Singapore.

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by pakarang View Post
            Voit Schneider propulsion?
            No this one has Azimuth Thrusters.
            Full specs at : http://www.keppelsmit.com.sg/images/...JUSTAR&SUN.pdf

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
              Thank you very much for the incredible tug pictures! Now I have to get myself to Singapore.
              You are welcome, any time.

              Comment


                #22
                ombugge: I have been looking at Singapore on Google Earth. Is there one area where you work or do you work the whole area? It looks like the entire coastline from the main city to the west is covered by containers and dock cranes.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                  ombugge: I have been looking at Singapore on Google Earth. Is there one area where you work or do you work the whole area? It looks like the entire coastline from the main city to the west is covered by containers and dock cranes.
                  I don't work on tugs, only visit once in a while for inspection for various purposes, mostly outside Singapore. My work is now mainly sitting at my computer at home trying to make a living as a Broker, selling Offshore Vessel, Tugs and Barges etc. but I also travel around a bit for various assignment, mainly in S.E.Asia but also to China, Korea, Japan and Australia, although not as much as before.

                  I will post some info on Singapore Port in the "This is Singapore" thread.

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                    #24
                    Thank you for the tug pictures. I have not seen one like Birk.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      TB Daya Maju

                      Pilotdane was asking about details of tugs earlier.

                      Here is a tug called "Daya Maju", blt. Samarinda 1995, 2560 Bhp/30 t. BP:


                      A bit special Bow configuration:


                      (An older version of X-Bow?)

                      Twin Cat 399 (Re-furbished):


                      A rather "primitive" Genset:


                      Oily Water Separator:

                      (Compulsory to have but probably never used)

                      Main Switch Board in the Engine Room:


                      Engine Room Work shop:


                      Hydraulic Steering by a small "Joystick":


                      Emergency steering by hand is also available:

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Radar and Echo sounder:


                        GPS Receiver:


                        Navtex Receiver:


                        SSB Radio Transceiver:

                        (It was "hidden" in a locker, but actually worked)

                        VHF Transceiver:


                        Engine Control Panel in the Wheel house:


                        Remote winch control in the Wheel house:

                        (Did not work)

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                          #27
                          Mess Room:


                          Galley:


                          Captain's Cabin:


                          Crew's Cabin below deck (8 Pers.):


                          Air condition unit in Crew's Cabin:


                          Not the best of tugs. I tried to find a buyer for this one for months.
                          These pics were taken after I had instigated a major cleaning and sprucing up. I lot of ****roaches suffered a sudden death from that.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            It is hard to beleive she was built in 1995. Her condition makes her look older.

                            I assume that is a drip pan under the air conditioner in the crew quarters. Not the most professional looking installation.

                            Thanks for the detailed pictures.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              A tug-and-tow for PilotDane, photographed at Rørvik on July 1st 2009:

                              The tug is Abramis I recollect...



                              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by pakarang View Post
                                A tug-and-tow for PilotDane, photographed at Rørvik on July 1st 2009:

                                The Barge in tow is probably destined for some fish farm, where it will be permanently moored and used as storage for feed stuff etc. Maybe even slaughtering and packing facilities.
                                They even have office and living quarters on this one by the look of the house.

                                Old Car Ferries used to be popular for this purpose, as seen in another thread earlier. Maybe they run out of suitable ferries?

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