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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    This vessel is a little special to me.
    ICELAND CEMENT was built in Kristiansund as a bulk carrying cargo vessel and delivered from Sterkoder shipyard as yard nr. 63 in January 1978 as SOLKLINT.
    Since then it has both been rebuilt from bulk to cement and lengthened ;-)


    To show the ship itself, I lent a picture from www.shipspotting.com
    http://cdn2.shipspotting.com/photos/.../6/1848614.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • Tommi
    commented on 's reply
    Yes they are all compass courses, and the reason for the difference is that they are different types of compasses.
    The 101.5 and 101.4 are repeaters for the gyro and magnetical (?) compasses. The display located above the window displaying 101.6 is a GPS-compass.

    The "extra" laptop in #258/2 is belonging to the pilot, not that he is actually using it for navigation. It's mostly used for planning and verification of turn rates and to display AIS-information.

  • Sterkoder
    replied
    I like reports from ship bridges, so thank you so much Tommi!! :-)

    (All the boys in my street wanted to be a fireman or police, I wanted to be a ship captain. Then, life took a completely different turn..., but that's another story)

    Anyway, I'm not sure what those digits mean, (maybe the compass course?), 101.4, 101.5, 101.6.
    They seem rather important since so many "boxes" show them, so to experts: what are they, and why does it differ after the point?? :-)
    (Not exactly a "what's the meaning of life"-question, but anyway)

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    commented on 's reply
    Probably enough to distract and confuse the Navigator. Look out the window, the real world is there.
    Alternatively; take the command away from the Master and navigator on watch and leave it to a computer that NEVER make a bad judgment.
    (Unless the Programmer has insufficient experience to foresee every conceivable situation, that is)

  • Tommi
    replied
    Radar / chartplotter. [url=https://flic.kr/p/rcshAJ] Enough navigational aids to be able to determine our exact location? [url=https://flic.kr/p/qXaL1y]

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    hahahaha.... great shots, Tommi.... Loved and laughed at the way the emergency stop sign was "extended" towards the actual button!

    Trondheim is come to stay! YEAH!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Thanks for your pictures guys! :-)
    That bridge of HUA HAI LONG must be one of the coldest I've ever seen. And I'm not talking about temperature. (Yes, I've seen a few, but of course..., not as many as others in here).

    Leave a comment:


  • Tommi
    replied

    How about some machine controls?


    Or a rudder indicator?


    The stuff from Trondheim is constantly following me...

    Leave a comment:


  • janihudi
    replied
    if the complete crew can have a party on the bridge,so much space

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  • ombugge
    replied
    Forklift is stowed on on the Forecastle deck when underway and submerged:


    Workboat stowed on Port side of Forecastle deck:


    Pakarang view:

    Now with a rig on deck.

    More on this vessel and the loading operation in the HLV thread later.

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    View of deck from the aft controls:


    From Stbd. Bridge wing:


    From aft of Bridge deck:


    Fwrd. Winches:





    These winches are used to position cargo over deck. (Similar winches on the Caissons aft)

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    Aft maneuver position:


    Engine Control & Alarm Panel:


    Winch Control Panel:


    Ballast Control Panel:


    Chart Table:

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    It's been a while since the last time I posted own pictures with details of a ship.
    Here is a presentation of the HLV Hua Hai Long, belonging to Guangzhou Salvage but commercially operated by COSCO Shipping Ltd.
    Here is specs for the vessel: http://www.coscoht.com/documents/2013HuaHaiLong.pdf

    Here she is at Jurong West Anchorage, Singapore, 29. Jan. 2015:




    The Bridge is very spacious and airy:




    Fwrd. controls:










    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    Here is some details from the building of SX 121 design Island Constructor at Ulstein: http://gcaptain.com/building-ulstein...d-constructor/

    If the Video don't want to play, here is link to pictures from the yard: http://gcaptain.com/island-performer...-verft-images/

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    Here is an article in Maasmond Newsclippings today about the subject of Lifeboat drill and safety:
    Lifeboat drill safety Lifeboat drills have presented and continue to present challenges and risks, which need to be understood and appropriately managed. Regrettably seafarers continue to face the risk of injury and fatality as a consequence of problems arising from lifeboat release mechanisms and drills. The ATSB report 37-MO-2014-002 details a situation where a free fall lifeboat was inadvertently released during a routine inspection. A crewman was seriously injured during this incident. The preliminary ATSB report considers that the release mechanism was “not fully and correctly reset after it was last exercised”. This lead to the crewman releasing the lifeboat unintentionally and furthermore two simulation wires were found to fail below their safe working load. The ATSB investigation in to this matter continues, but it is important for vessels to continue to pay close attention to lifeboat drill safety ensuring that: lifeboat release mechanisms are properly checked and maintained crew have been trained in and understand the operation of the mechanism on the vessel they are serving on any maintenance or activity in relation to the lifeboat and its mechanism is undertaken in conformity with SOLAS and the vessel’s SMS having a working model of the lifeboat system on board, which crew can use for training purposes If any concerns arise with respect to the safety of any planned maintenance or drill, it will be prudent to stop and take stock of the situation rather than to proceed in circumstances where the continued safety of the activity can no longer be assured. Loss prevention materials The Association has previously advised members with respect to safety and lifeboat drills. Further, the Association has published a book on lifeboat release hooks, which can be obtained at Witherby Seamanship. Source: Skuld

    Leave a comment:

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