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Towage and Marine Operations

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  • ombugge
    replied
    The fore half of FPSO BW Catcher was built in Goseong. S.Korea and transported to Singapore for mating with the aft part, before being towed to the Catcher Field Offshore Norway on completion.
    This video shows:
    - World's heaviest transport by self-propelled modular transport (SPMT), with total 324 axles,
    - Lunching by Floating dock ,
    - Loading and transport from Korea to Singapore on HLV Osprey

    Link: http://www.kctc.co.kr/eng/business/i...-logistics.asp

    PS> I'm a little surprised they did not show clearly that the transporters set the cargo on blocks in the floating dock and moved off before tow-out and submerging.

    PPS> I don't know much space was available at either side between the transporters and the blocks here, but I was involved in a loadout in Japan and discharging in Saudi Arabia of a 1500 m.t. module where the clearance on either side was 2".

    The SPMT used in Saudi was especially impressive, since it had "balloon tiers" on all 64 axles and was able keep the bed level for roadless desert transport. It was nicknamed "Little Big Ben" and made 1.5 mph at max speed. (That was back in 1976)

    The HLV used was very basic and only 2002 DWT, belonging to West India Line, West Palm Beach, Fl.
    Not this one but a sister ship:

    Last edited by ombugge; March 9th, 2018, 00:06.

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  • ombugge
    replied
    Pioneering Spirit removing the Brent Delta topsides:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_jBDw34uec


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  • ombugge
    replied
    A large new field is under development in the Norwegian Sector of the North Sea at the moment.
    Here is the first jacket being launched and placed in position by SSCV Thialf: http://gcaptain.com/watch-giant-joha...ed-off-norway/
    Been there, done that.

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  • ombugge
    replied
    Another big operation in progress: Installation of the Mariner deck structure off Shetland: https://sysla.no/offshore/loftes-10-...ariner-feltet/

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  • ombugge
    replied
    Since I'm no longer involved with this type of operations, this is the best I can do.

    The Aasta Hansteen spar has arrived in Norway and will be discharged from Dockwise Vanguard in the nearest few days (weather permitting).
    Here is an article from TU with video of the Loadout in Korea the discharging in Hoylandsbygd and the intended upending operation in Klosterfjorden: https://www.tu.no/artikler/na-naerme...skroget/396048

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  • ombugge
    replied
    Another major towing operation is under way. Ichthys Explorer, the "Central Processing Platform (CPP) for the Ichthys offshore gas field off Northern Territories, Australia has left from the building yard in Geoje, South Koran under tow by 4 AHTS belonging to POSH Terasea in Singapore, who will also be responsible for the installation in the field: http://www.offshoreenergytoday.com/video-ichthys-platform-sets-sail-to-australia/

    OK, I have to admit it, I do miss being part of such large operations once in a while. But then again, I also have to admit that I have become too old for those things.

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  • ombugge
    replied
    Marine Operation: Yes. Offshore: No
    This bridge element was constructed in Germany and transported to Kirkenes, Norway on a Dutch barge standing on two multi-wheeled linked transporters for installation across Bokfjorden in Sor-Varanger. Another example of multi-industrial, multi-discipline and multi-national operation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0joOQR8z-U

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  • ombugge
    replied
    Pioneering Spirit has done it's biggest lift yet: http://gcaptain.com/giant-pioneering...elta-platform/

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  • ombugge
    replied
    The Offshore Wind market is still booming in Western Europe at least.
    Here is how cables are laid on a Wind Farm in the North Sea: https://gcaptain.com/subsea-cable-in...Captain.com%29

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  • ombugge
    replied
    Pioneering Spirit has successfully done the first removal job off Norway: https://gcaptain.com/record-breaking...th-sea-photos/

    Now back to Rotterdam for additional "arms" to be fitted before the big one in the Brent Field, UK waters.

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  • Clipper
    replied
    From various BBC reports dated 8th to 22nd August 2016 ...

    Early Monday 8th August, the 17,000-tonne (deadweight presumably) semi-submersible drilling rig Transocean Winner, under tow from Norway to Turkey, via Malta, to be scrapped, ran aground on the Isle of Lewis, Western Isles Scotland, after towing line between the rig and its tow Alp Forward broke in stormy weather.

    The structure is reported to have been carrying more than 60,000 gallons of fuel, more than 12,000 gallons (56,000 litres) of which were reported on 11 Aug to be lost. On 20 Aug, it was reported that 280 tonnes [why the change of units?] of diesel oil was removed without [further] polution.

    22 Aug - TV news reports an attempt will be made to refloat the rig on this evening's high tide about 22:00. Presumably this attempt will be undertaken by salvage company Smit, which was earlier reported to have been appointed to deal with the incident.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...lands-37158461 (follow links for earlier reposts)


    Addendum 1 (information also from BBC):

    22 Aug - Transocean Winner was refloated at 22:04, close to high tide, and is being towed by the two tugs Union Bear and Union Princess around Lewis to Broad Bay on the east side of the island. The journey will cover about 54 miles and could take up to 21 hours to complete.
    Last edited by Clipper; August 23rd, 2016, 10:29.

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  • Oistein
    commented on 's reply
    Sometimes it can be nice to be small

  • ombugge
    replied
    Small scale towing operation in Aalesund:


    Since the exit was closed he disappeared under Stornespiren, to reappear at the ro/ro ramp on the other side.

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  • ombugge
    replied
    Don't know if you have seen this on NatGeo Channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQwa...&nohtml5=False
    I was not involved with this project, but I was once Marine Adviser on the LB 200, which laid the main section of the pipe and featured here.

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  • ombugge
    replied
    I also found a couple of pictures from the tow of the Argentine Jackup Rio Colorado I from Tierra del Fuego to Puerto Madryn, Argentina, a distance of about 800 n.miles.

    The towing vessel was the South African Salvage Tug WALRAAD WOLTEMADE, one of the world's most powerful tugs at the time: http://www.leithshipyards.com/ships-built-in-leith/1946-to-1984/501-sawolraad-woltemade-yard-no-516-ocean-salvage-tug-safmarine-built-1976.html

    Seen here approaching to make up tow in Baia San Sebastian, Tierra del Fuego on a bleak autumns day
    in 1985:


    On the way we got caught in a storm that was not forecasted (not an unusual occurrence in that area at that time):


    The dedicated forecast was for a force 4 so we decided to cross the mouth of Golfo San Jorge, in stead of following the coastline as originally planned.
    When I called the Duty forecaster to report that we were experiencing a force 10-11 storm, his answer was; No, that is not possible. I shall not quote my reply here.
    Luckily we made it without any serious damages. I was thankful for having only 8 riding crew on the rig and a helicopter following our progress up along the coast, just in case.

    It is not a very nice area to operate rigs, especially not small jackups, or anything else afloat for that matter.

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