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2014,the third CV Family meeting in Noord Brabant the Netherlands

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    those where the cube images of me,lets go to the next stop.

    you all follow the bleu car.
    best regards Thijs

    Comment


      WOW, what a superb set of photos, Thijs. They make me want to go back and start all over again. You were just having me on, weren't you! If members don't have an excellent understanding of the Cube Houses now, then they never will.
      My own last view, taken from partway up the ramp in Thijs' image above, was this:


      Now let's follow the blue car to our next destination. On you go, Thijs.
      Ivy

      "To thine own self be true.......
      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

      Comment


        and we follow the bleu car over the red line from A to B.
        (but somewhere i got lost )



        so where could you find this (fictive) waterlevel from 1953.



        or this (fictive) waterlevel in 1995,but neverteless,Ivy got wet feet

        best regards Thijs

        Comment


          the flood of 1953,al that is green was flooded.

          for orientation,
          1=Woudrichem
          2=Giessen
          3=Drimmelen. (where we started for the sailingtrip through De Biesbos)

          best regards Thijs

          Comment


            Dams,dunes and dyks.

            the Netherlands are surrounded........Thousends kilometers dams,dykes and dunes are protecting our land from al sides against the water.
            Without those barriers our country would be for 2/3 on regular base flooded.


            17,500 kilometer
            our low land at the sea counts about 3,500kilometers primairy waterbarriers .(direct at sea or rivers)

            by that we have also 14.000kilometers regionairy barriers.
            if we place al those barriers in a line we would have a waterbarrier from here to Nieuw Zeeland.

            Dykrings

            within the Netherlands there are differend safetynorms for the primairy waterbarriers.
            our country is divided in the so called ''dykrings.

            for every other dykring there is another norm.
            this has to do with the valleu of the country behind the dyke:the amout of inhabits,the economical acivity,and how deep the land is under sealevel.
            nor every where is danger for floods big.

            safe safer safest

            the economical hart of our land the densely populated ''randstad'' (the triangle Amsterdam,the Hageu and Rotterdam) lays far under sealevel.
            the deepest polders are almost 7,oo meters under N.A.P (nieuw Amsterdam peil, waterlevel at Amsterdam what is the normal level here)
            the consequences of a flood in the ''Randstad are many times higher then of a aeria what is just a half meter below sealevel,and where is hardly any population.
            the dykes that protect the ''randstad'' have to meet highest protection norms of 1/10.000.
            this means that the dykes have to hold a flood that could happens ones in 10.000years.
            aerias with less population like Zeeland and North Nederland counts 1/4.000 as a norm.
            the riverdykes have the norm of 1/1,250





            best regards Thijs

            Comment


              the colors of Netherlands are the norms for ones of many years against flood.
              see below the colored blocks.



              in the us surrounding countries are less stringent standards.
              the highest norm for Germany is 1/500
              and the tames barrier that is protecting the metropool Londen, is designed for a flood that happens 1/1000
              then are the norm for the Randstad higher by a factor 10



              best regards Thijs

              Comment


                Thijs, many, many thanks for the hard work you have put into explaining and interpreting the displays above. Studying the map showing the different parts of the Netherlands and the protection they have against storm surges of varying frequencies, makes one realise just how very vulnerable your country is. You mentioned the Thames Surge barrier and that sent me off looking for facts and figures about it. When I was in London last year for a few days and visited the Woolwich Arsenal I walked down to the river and you could see the barrier from there. One site I was looking at tonight said that it is the second largest after the Oosterschelde barrier.
                I shall come back tomorrow and study your information again.
                Ivy

                "To thine own self be true.......
                Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                Comment


                  and we follow the bleu car over the red line from A to B.
                  (but somewhere i got lost )
                  Yes, it was quite terrifying, for Thijs thought he was driving the Splashbus and I only just managed to yank on the handbrake to stop him driving down the slipway into the water. But we'll show you that trip later - in the Real Splashbus.
                  Thijs asked at #123 where we could find the fictitious showing of rooms in a house damaged by the 1953 floods. Although I knew it was in the Hoek van Holland area by the massive gates of the Maeslant barrier, I didn't know the name of the little museum. Googling soon told me - the Kerringhuis. It showed an excellent mock-up of the inside of a house with water-stained wallpaper, damaged furniture and all the little furnishings of a home at that time. Imagining the horror of seeing what was happening to your home, of having to flee for your life and leave it all to fate, was very moving.
                  I have mentioned this somewhere on the forum a while ago, but it fits well here, so I'll repeat it. In 1953 I was working in Whitehall in what was then the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, but our building on the corner of Parliament Square had a small section of the Min. of Defence tucked away on the top floor. They were the Air Photo division and the information on many of their photos was transcribed on to the Maps Office attached to the Map Library where I worked. I well remember those days after the flood, going up to collect the transparencies portraying the east coast floods in this country so that the Maps Office could quickly get to work on them. We knew, of course, that the Netherlands had also been badly affected, but our concern at the time was for our own country.
                  So, with those memories in my mind, I suppose that has been the mainspring for my interest in learning much about the flood defences of our neighbour country. I wanted so much to see the Delta Works, but without one's own transport that was more or less impossible. However, on mentioning it to Thijs in 2012 he immediately organised our exploration of the area. See here for the start of our photos. That was a great day, (one of many great days, in fact). And now I have been close up to the Maeslant barrier. There are flood defences all over the country, of course, but these are the big ones and I am grateful to be given the opportunity for seeing them.
                  Ivy

                  "To thine own self be true.......
                  Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                  Comment


                    for one of the other weird reason i don't have much images (everybody happy) from the inside of the Keringhouse.
                    not much from the outside eather.

                    there where a few buttons on the wal for info videos and they where played on this floorscreen.



                    best regards Thijs

                    Comment


                      but it was also to see at the wall,with the big red buttons.





                      but it was mostly written info,and just in Dutch.
                      best regards Thijs

                      Comment


                        a model of the big pipes of the door arms.
                        size? sea on the left of the pipe,9cm thick steel and a diameter of 180cm,this means that when i am 1,74cm that i can stand straight up.
                        i tried it,and YES I CAN.



                        the deltaworks,are more than the big barries at sea.

                        best regards Thijs

                        Comment


                          First of all thank you for that indeed great report from inside the cube houses. I had to laugh about your symmetric pictures of the coloured top ceiling of the house. I think the intention of the architect was to avoid any symmetric impression, but some hypnotic effect -- especially after a joint. Very good. I really have to go there some day.
                          Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

                          Comment


                            the hydrolic radial piston motor



                            6 of these motors are closing/opening each door.

                            best regards Thijs

                            Comment


                              outside,but still inside

                              those big diameter pipes are those where the model is in #131-1



                              best regards Thijs

                              Comment


                                a paint job



                                best regards Thijs

                                Comment

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