Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sharp Things

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Sharp Things

    I have never lived in a large city so the idea that horizontal railings should have sharp things to prevent people from sitting or pipes should have spikes to prevent climbing is an alien idea. If you have seen my sinking boats thread you know I can become caught on odd little details of a place. As you will see the sharp things of Amsterdam became an interest of mine.







    When I look at any one photo I think it might have an artistic quality, but when viewed together I'm amazed at how they all start to blend together and become generic.

    Can you tell I like f2.8?

    #2




    Comment


      #3




      Comment


        #4




        Comment


          #5
          Some poor soul (or dog) lost a bit of hair on this one.





          Comment


            #6




            A bit bland compared to the others but I suppose it works.

            Comment


              #7


              Comment


                #8




                Ok, I am done.





                I do not often go back and look closely at most of my photographs but for some reason I can not stop looking at these sharp things. Maybe it is my hard cider working on me, but I find myself looking at the details of each sharp; their shape, the spots of rust, the workmanship. The house we stayed in while in Amsterdam was built in 1615, about 150 years before the United States was formed, and I wonder when these sharp things were made. Could the chains with spikes have been made recently in China or did some blacksmith sweat for days hammering them out several hundred years ago?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Clever idea for a thread!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I'll tell you a story about sharp things. We have the ruins of a 12th century castle in our town. At one time you could wander along the path round to the drawbridge area or cross the grass and go up to the walls of the keep towers without hindrance. Then they decided to "improve" things. They built a visitor centre cum cafe, enclosed the castle in spiked railings so that the only entrance to the castle was via the cafe and charged £1 entrance. We locals were up in arms at the latter, we were used to showing our visitors around free but must now pay that £1. That was later rescinded, and there was some sense in railing everything in because of the damage that was being done to the castle by drunken louts. Nothing is safe these days.
                    However, one day, some idiot children were playing about outside the railings when their ball went over. One of them tried to climb over to retrieve it and did himself a mischief in the process.
                    Guess what happened? Precious darling's mother rampaged up to the town council - I don't remember whether she took them to court, but they had to saw the point off every spike.
                    I think they call it Health and Safety.
                    Last edited by wherrygirl; December 6th, 2010, 12:08.
                    Ivy

                    "To thine own self be true.......
                    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I don’t know about the Netherlands, but in the UK a lot of decorative wrought iron, which was a big feature of Victorian architecture, was removed for the “war effort”, 1940 or so. I don’t know much about this –the extent to which the material was reused or a propaganda exercise – but the effects on townscapes live on.
                      Here in part of central Edinburgh there was older, Georgian, ironwork, and now being a World Heritage conservation area there is a trade in “second hand” architectural bits and pieces of all kinds, (some of it rescued during the trend of demolish rather than restore in the 60’s) as well as companies producing new replacement material.

                      The non-decorative spikes resulting from reactions to crime prevention are also fascinating. All in all I think you have hit upon a tremendously interesting subject that we could all be on the look-out for on our photo walks. Links in with the building details photo assignment threads too.

                      Your photo set is superb Dane, and you are not the only one who is coming back again to look at it!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Seagull View Post
                        I don’t know about the Netherlands, but in the UK a lot of decorative wrought iron, which was a big feature of Victorian architecture, was removed for the “war effort”, 1940 or so. I don’t know much about this –the extent to which the material was reused or a propaganda exercise – but the effects on townscapes live on.
                        You are quite right, Cecilia. I'm a Londoner, and railings everywhere disappeared, all except ours! Our home was rented from the nearby family brewery and the railings were quite tall. Somehow - goodness knows how - the brewery managed to hang on to them. I think the iron must surely have been used, there would have been so much of it. There was also a demand for unwanted saucepans etc. to go to making planes, so short was GB of the latter at the start of hostilities. Panic stations all round.
                        As a matter of interest, the churches here in my town are minus railings and in one of them the low wall is just as it was when they were removed, you can see the cemented over holes.
                        Ivy

                        "To thine own self be true.......
                        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by wherrygirl View Post
                          You are quite right, Cecilia. I'm a Londoner, and railings everywhere disappeared, all except ours! Our home was rented from the nearby family brewery and the railings were quite tall. Somehow - goodness knows how - the brewery managed to hang on to them. I think the iron must surely have been used, there would have been so much of it. There was also a demand for unwanted saucepans etc. to go to making planes, so short was GB of the latter at the start of hostilities. Panic stations all round.
                          As a matter of interest, the churches here in my town are minus railings and in one of them the low wall is just as it was when they were removed, you can see the cemented over holes.
                          Isn't it lovely and quite interesting how we manage to uncover bits of history in the most INTERESTING places?????

                          How here's a question to think about...if Dane was able to take such wonderful photos of (what I am assuming is ) iron railings in Amsterdam, are they still there because, once occupied, the Germans didn't see a need for the iron--they had enough? Were they removed in Britain because of her being an island nation, and desperately needing to use the resources present as there was access to no other?
                          Oh, here E goes, leading us all astray and OT.........

                          Comment


                            #14
                            E. I'm putting my reply over on the Chit-chat thread, OK?
                            Last edited by wherrygirl; December 6th, 2010, 22:52.
                            Ivy

                            "To thine own self be true.......
                            Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Seagull View Post
                              I don’t know about the Netherlands, but in the UK a lot of decorative wrought iron, which was a big feature of Victorian architecture, was removed for the “war effort”, 1940 or so. I don’t know much about this –the extent to which the material was reused or a propaganda exercise – but the effects on townscapes live on.


                              Wherrygirl:

                              You are quite right, Cecilia. I'm a Londoner, and railings everywhere disappeared, all except ours! Our home was rented from the nearby family brewery and the railings were quite tall. Somehow - goodness knows how - the brewery managed to hang on to them. I think the iron must surely have been used, there would have been so much of it. There was also a demand for unwanted saucepans etc. to go to making planes, so short was GB of the latter at the start of hostilities. Panic stations all round.
                              As a matter of interest, the churches here in my town are minus railings and in one of them the low wall is just as it was when they were removed, you can see the cemented over holes.


                              The removal of iron railings and appeal for old aluminium pots and pans in the UK during WWII was, I believe, a propaganda exercise as much as an appeal for raw materials for recycling. Everywhere one went, the evidence of removed decorative and security fencing served as a reminder that 'we were all in it together' and 'everyone had to make sacrifices'.

                              However, I have read that VERY little of the donated metal ended up being used, I believe it wqs a low percentage - possibly due to costs of recycling and removal of contaminates??? I have read that the vast majority was just tipped into landfill. Seems absolutely criminal as so much beautiful wrought iron work would have been desecrated.

                              I guess if local authorities took responsibility for removal, public works yards would have quickly filled with iron from all over and a solution for getting rid had to be found. Somewhere, all those many railings are lying rusting away!
                              Last edited by Paul Cobb; March 23rd, 2011, 13:44. Reason: Adding extra quote

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X