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Photo Assignement: Looking Closer: small buildings, small detail

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    Photo Assignement: Looking Closer: small buildings, small detail

    We look at great public buildings, large commercial ones, huge blocks of flats and we admire or criticise what we see. What about the little houses and shops in our home towns, and the finer details in the brickwork, or the windows or the roofs .....?


    I was interested in the string just below the first floor windows:




    I have never seen detail quite like this before.

    And I saw two windows which, instead of the usual arch of tapered bricks above, had a few courses of brick shingles. I'm not sure whether I would have enjoyed that different touch if it had been a large building with the same treatment for all windows, but on this scale I like it.





    Another window, this time the elegant Venetian window. A great surprise in a small town like this one.



    What on earth........??


    Just a bootscraper, but the only bootscraper in a row of attractive Georgian houses, built some time after the Great Fire of 1688 had devastated much of the small town's centre. The scraper is probably contemporary with the house, and the base is now covered with present-day concrete. Just as well, otherwise it would have been "lifted" long ago.

    Look at the beautiful, painstaking work on this fish-scale slate roof:



    This is one of five cottages built in the mid-1800's, and the tiles are probably from the Welsh slate quarries just opening up due to the coming of the railway.

    Below is a patch of flintwork on a low wall. Neat bit of restoration work, actually, after something had backed into the wall.


    Flint is a common building material in East Anglia, there's so much of it lying around - certainly in my garden! About an hour's drive away are some Neolithic flint mines and, while viewed from above ground you see just a piece of grassy land with strange humps dotted about it, below are the tunnels, some accessible to visitors.

    But to go back to the cottages above, there is some fine knapped flintwork in the walls:



    I once watched a man breaking open a large flint ready to demonstrate the art of knapping, and inside was a fossil. You can sometimes see what appear to be small ones in worked flints.
    Last edited by wherrygirl; May 3rd, 2010, 16:46.
    Ivy

    "To thine own self be true.......
    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

    #2
    Inspired idea for a thread from the Excellent Wherrygirl!
    You will excuse my name for you, won’t you Ivy, but it comes from a thought I had from your very earliest posts. It’s a message to all our non-UK members who, apart from finding topics of interest here on CV Forum, also appreciate the opportunity to improve their English. My advice is, don’t struggle with that seagull’s squawking – your model for superb command of the English language should be the Excellent Wherrygirl. ( Some eloquent lads around here too of course . . . )
    But moving rapidly back on topic, and it’s a fascinating one – I have been away from brickwork English regions, let alone flint country, for so long that this all seems rather exotic! More please.

    Comment


      #3
      Cecilia, you are generous in your praise, but at the expense of your own writings and this should not be. I always enjoy reading your words, too. We are so lucky in the variety of expression in our English language. From the basic Anglo-Saxon/Norman French mix there have been absorbed words and expressions from peoples we have conquered, been conquered by, traded with, etc. so that we end up with so many different ways of saying the same thing - yet always with that slight extra nuance, depending on which words we choose, that sways the full meaning one way or the other.
      Yes, I'm being OT, too. But that's the thing that's so delightful about CV. Its branches are strong enough to support the twigs and occasional twittering that goes on!
      Glad you enjoy this thread. But it's for anyone to add in what they see, too, you know, so come on
      PS. How's that for a mixing of metaphors: CaptainsVoyage, trees, threads..... I'd better disappear quickly!
      Last edited by wherrygirl; May 5th, 2010, 10:39.
      Ivy

      "To thine own self be true.......
      Thou canst not then be false to any man."

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by wherrygirl View Post
        Yes, I'm being OT, too. But that's the thing that's so delightful about CV. Its branches are strong enough to support the twigs and occasional twittering that goes on!
        Glad you enjoy this thread. But it's for anyone to add in what they see, too, you know, so come on
        PS. How's that for a mixing of metaphors: CaptainsVoyage, trees, threads..... I'd better disappear quickly!
        That is what is GOOD about CVF, no moderator to tell you that you are OT, or indeed to remove posts because they are deemed OT by some.

        Let the free thoughts flow, that the way to make an interesting forum.
        (Said by one of the biggest OT sinners )

        Comment


          #5
          Carry on sinning, Ombugge, (within reason, of course - ahem....)
          Ivy

          "To thine own self be true.......
          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by wherrygirl View Post
            Cecilia, you are generous in your praise, but at the expense of your own writings and this should not be. ....
            ....Glad you enjoy this thread. But it's for anyone to add in what they see, too, you know, so come on
            I do realise that many enjoy what I write, (posted some ramblings from the Skyscape Diaries just now, as if to prove the point!), but that is different from being a suitable role-model .

            See, I’ve been off topic on this topic before . . .
            http://www.captainsvoyage-forum.com/...1&postcount=44

            I promise (as in add to the very long to do list) to make an effort to capture some “Looking Closer ” details locally – an activity which might also spur me into more local action on the “Then and Now” topic, but my mind and effort is still very much in Thailand right now. . .

            Comment


              #7
              Here are some interesting door knockers I saw in Antiqua, Guatemala.



              Comment


                #8
                Now these are really interesting, Pilotdane. I was going to go round the town photographing some of ours, but they are classic in style and yours will put them to shame. Still, I'll add them some time. Were these typical of what you saw - or unusual?
                That's a keyhole just to the right in the second one, isn't it? It is beautifully decorated, too. And what are the two knobs above the knocker?
                Ivy

                "To thine own self be true.......
                Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                Comment


                  #9
                  to hang your coat on ,when it taken to lang,before somebody opens the door

                  but this is the way it should be;
                  to hang your coat on,when it taken too long,before somebody opens the door.

                  i dont improve the upper line,otherwise is wherrygirls reply useless
                  Last edited by janihudi; May 8th, 2010, 16:45.
                  best regards Thijs

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by janihudi View Post
                    to hang your coat on ,when it taken to lang,before somebody opens the door
                    Oh, ha... ha...ha... funny man
                    PS: lang=Dutch, long=English. And what did I tell you about "to" and "too"
                    Ivy

                    "To thine own self be true.......
                    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by wherrygirl View Post
                      Oh, ha... ha...ha... funny man
                      PS: lang=Dutch, long=English. And what did I tell you about "to" and "too"
                      about the lang/long issiue,just a mistake,i know that one.
                      when i come from the dutch modelbuildingforum,my head is still in the dutch mode,and when i come to CV i am writhing in dutch,otherwise when i coming from CV and go to the dutch forum i am typing in englisch,so i am regular in the wrong language.
                      thatswhy i always read my replies through before i post them,but you can always overlook something.

                      i am working om my replies ,months, easier and other kinds off those of words,not even close to and too.

                      but i have change it
                      Last edited by janihudi; May 8th, 2010, 16:47.
                      best regards Thijs

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by janihudi View Post
                        when i come from the dutch modelbuildingforum,my head is still in the dutch mode,and when i come to CV i am writhing in dutch,otherwise when i coming from CV and go to the dutch forum i am typing in englisch,so i am regular in the wrong language.
                        What a confusing life you lead! But it doesn't disturb your sense of humour, which I love.
                        Seriously, janihudi, your English is really good, it is colloquial and, apart from occasional mistakes which any non-native speaker might make, flows easily. You don't need to worry about it.
                        Ivy

                        "To thine own self be true.......
                        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                        Comment


                          #13
                          thanks Ivy,my niece show me a translationsite where you can type the word in dutch press enter and it shows in englisch and vica verca,is also handy because i dont know which every word means,like your ''colloquial'',
                          now i know.
                          but i try not too use it too much,its like at school,looking at/in your neighbours book when you cant do it by yourself,and make the same misstake.
                          best regards Thijs

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by janihudi View Post
                            thanks Ivy,my niece show me a translationsite where you can type the word in dutch press enter and it shows in englisch and vica verca,is also handy because i dont know which every word means,like your ''colloquial'',
                            now i know.
                            but i try not too use it too much,its like at school,looking at/in your neighbours book when you cant do it by yourself,and make the same misstake.
                            Reminds me of a story; The Mate on a ship was going to order a new hose to was the decks ("Vannslange" in Norwegian) from a Ship Chandler in Rotterdam.

                            His English was NOT too good, but he knew that "vann" was Water in English, but for that "slange"-bit he had to look it up in the dictionary.
                            Ah, there it was; "Slange" - Snake.
                            He ordered 20 m. of 1 1/2 inch. "watersnake", much to the amusement of the Ship Chandler Clerk.

                            And the moral of the story? Dictionaries (and web-based translation tools) can get you into deep water. Sometime with watersnakes in it.
                            Here is one example of a watersnake:

                            Comment


                              #15
                              you see,thats what i ment somewhere on cv in one of my postings,
                              the same word can mean 2 differend things,and the post can be completed abracadraba
                              he should have a t-shirt with,Sorry for my rotten englisch, printed on it
                              best regards Thijs

                              Comment

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