Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help E (....and Sterkoder....) figure out a new camera

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • pilotdane
    replied
    While cruising in Alaska I had no trouble taking pictures. Then on my Panama Canal cruise I remember looking through the camera and wondering why everything was fuzzy? Than it hit me. In Alaska my camera was warm inside the cabin going out into the cold. No problem. On the Panama Canal cruise my camera and lenses were cold inside the air conditioning and when I took them out in the tropical heat and humidity fog formed on the lens. Luckily I learned to heat my camera with the hair dryer before going outside.

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    Road to discovery can sometimes reveal themselves at certain points.

    We can't think of everything, so we rather learn something every single day!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Originally posted by pakarang View Post
    Sterkoder, you are on a roll today!!!

    Another thing when taking photos from the car, and using the car as support: do you run or do you stop the vibrating engine?
    Well...., no But I never use the car structure itself as support, and if I do, then I turn off my engine.

    Never saw the heatwaves between my hot car cabin and cold outside air so distinct as today, and it dawned on me like a slap in the face that these waves has passed right in front of my camera lense without me seeing them.

    This HAS to have something to say for the quality of images in zoom, I can't imagine else...

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
    Today, I discovered something I never thought about, and never did with my old camera either.
    I've thought about it for a few hours now, wondering if I should tell you, because it's so embarrassing:

    You know, almost 90% of my pictures I take from the seat of my car. I do this because the situation allows it and because it gives me good support when holding the camera.
    But here's the clue; when taking pictures from inside a car on a cold day...., and the car cabin is good and hot...., need I say more??
    Sterkoder, you are on a roll today!!!

    Another thing when taking photos from the car, and using the car as support: do you run or do you stop the vibrating engine?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Today, I discovered something I never thought about, and never did with my old camera either.
    I've thought about it for a few hours now, wondering if I should tell you, because it's so embarrassing:

    You know, almost 90% of my pictures I take from the seat of my car. I do this because the situation allows it and because it gives me good support when holding the camera.
    But here's the clue; when taking pictures from inside a car on a cold day...., and the car cabin is good and hot...., need I say more??

    Hint: this might be the reason for the blur in my images when using zoom.
    Last edited by Sterkoder; February 19th, 2010, 20:01.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Originally posted by pakarang View Post
    Going manual is always the better choice...
    Of course, for a pro or semipro photographer who knows what he/she is doing that is indeed the better choice, but I really enjoyed the 'Auto'.

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
    So in short: the 'Auto' choise I used almost 100% in my old camera, can not be used in my new one
    Going manual is always the better choice...

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    So in short:
    the 'Auto' choice I used almost 100% in my old camera, can not be used in my new one
    Last edited by Sterkoder; February 16th, 2010, 23:33.

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    I agree with Dane on the battery issue... I don't think the battery setting has nothing to do with picture quality.

    Thinking about your problem, which you mention happens more at high zoom, I think it is more a problem with DOF than anything else. (DOF= depth of field).

    This is something which is also a very big problem with my MP-E65mm super MACRO lens. What I mean with a limited DOF is that only the part of the subject which is at one exact distance from the lens glass, will become sharp. All other parts of the subject which is either nearer, or further away (such as background) will be blurred.

    The only thing that will help with a limited DOF is a steady hand (tripod) and a very low aperture setting (f16-f32), but that again requires more light/ higher ISO setting if light is not available.

    Higher aperture settings as mentioned above is often used in landscape photography to get the entire scene sharp (the scene is in the whole picture), while portraits is using a low aperture (f2,8- f5.6) because you want the background blurred.

    Leave a comment:


  • pilotdane
    replied
    I wonder if the battery selection is for the cameras low battery warning since each battery technology operates at a slightly different voltage and their voltage changes differently as they run low.

    As for sharpness you probably have to enlarge/zoom very close on your computer monitor to see the difference. I generally make sharpness adjustments at 1:1 where the picture is 3 or 4 times bigger than my screen.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    "Stupid" question:

    In my camera I have the option to lock on a certain type of batteries. I have AA NiHM, but had my camera set on "AA Alkaline".
    Does this have any influence on picture quality?
    I also wonder if I have the right sharpness selected. I changed from "Standard" to "Hard"...., but could not spot any significant changes.

    Some of you might be tired beyond I don't know what when it comes to my camera-problems, but I belive we don't get any good answers unless we ask,
    and I belive we're in here to help eachother whenever needed...
    Last edited by Sterkoder; February 15th, 2010, 22:03.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Been testing out a bit here in 'P'-mode and 'Auto' in my own living room.
    I see differences, but I'll have to wait until daylight to try it out "full scale".
    Also a difference when changing from single IS to double IS.

    Puh...., embarrassing to ask such questions for a "photographer", who should know his equipment in and out...., but I think to my self; well..., after all you manage to see which image is good and which one is not, or at least the ability to see that something is wrong
    Last edited by Sterkoder; February 10th, 2010, 20:14.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Hey, look at this!!!!
    Of course this is the manual I have, but in a way...., looking to solve "a great problem" in an irritated mode made me almost blind to solutions.
    Thank you so much for helping out, I appreciate it so much!!!

    Must get off work now, and try it out later

    Leave a comment:


  • Seagull
    replied
    Sterkoder, I looked up your Fujifilm FinePix S1500 on the Steve’s digicams, as mentioned by Clipper, and found:
    For focusing you have Continuous AF or Single AF (default)
    And the AF Mode can be selected to be Center, Multi, Area, or Tracking
    This appears to be in the Shooting Menu.

    Then I found the manual for the camera and the relevant pages.
    I have run out of time today to stop and think about this info right now, but hope it might help.



    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    It's one of Murphy's laws.
    Oh, do I know that guy!!!!
    Sometimes I feel like he's my shadow

    But anyway, I look forward to lighter days, spring and summer so that I can resume my hobby of taking pictures.
    And in some years, when my newly aquired camera gets old, the HS10 might have dropped so much in price that I then can have the 30 x zoom 24-720mm linsed camera.
    (But, wonder what old Murphy will pull out of his sleve then...? )

    You know, the HS10 also have something called Motion Remover. Pretty neat to have if you want to take picture of an object which is a tourist magnet and the pictureframes are filled with tourists. The camera does an in-camera analysis just as you release the trigger button pressure, and if any of the tourists move...., voalah!....., their history!

    Take a look at my "wet dream" , read the article and weep: http://www.dpreview.com/news/1002/10...hs10series.asp
    Last edited by Sterkoder; February 3rd, 2010, 00:38.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X