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    Re: This is Singapore

    Originally posted by PoloUK View Post
    Still have many dear friends in Singapore - miss the place very much, but since I've gone off aeroplanes it's a very long drive!!
    Has anybody told you that driving is statistically a lot more dangerous than flying???
    Get over it man and see you here in Singapore soon!!! The beer is always cold at Cable Car, I'll buy you one.

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      Re: This is Singapore

      Originally posted by ombugge View Post
      Has anybody told you that driving is statistically a lot more dangerous than flying???
      Get over it man and see you here in Singapore soon!!! The beer is always cold at Cable Car, I'll buy you one.
      Bless you for that!

      Re the Half Height Screen Doors on the East / West lines - yep, my lot are responsible for the electronics interfacing the doors to the signalling and the trains. We've been working in Singapore since the original build in the 1980s. For much of that time we worked in cooperation with Keppel Automation - a spin off from the shipyard. My dear Keppel colleagues would be commissioning trains with me one day, then commissioning radar systems on ships the next day.

      My company is also working on the Downtown Line - but for the first time in our history of working in Singapore this isn't being run out of the UK.
      Cheers,

      Mark.

      www.pologlover.co.uk

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        Re: This is Singapore

        Dear ombugge,

        May I ask a question about taxation in Singapore...?

        How is the tax system there... and how much do residents pay in taxes?

        I know it's not an easy question to answer in a short reply, but I just would like to learn about the simple-short-reply to tax there.
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

        Comment


          Re: This is Singapore

          Income Taxes in Singapore is progressive, with the max. tax 20%. VAT is presently 7%.
          Everybody living and working in Singapore has to pay tax, even if on temporary assignment and Employment Pass, not a resident.

          If you are a Permanent Resident (PR) there is also Medisave to be paid, but this goes into your Medisave account and can be used to pay medical expenses. (Hospitalization, not simple Doctor visits etc.) It can also be used to pay for private Medical Insurance through approved Insurance companies.

          If you are employed on local terms (not Expat Contract) by a locally registered employer and a PR, you also have to pay in to CPF.
          Presently that is 16% of monthly salary from the Employer and 20% from the Employee. This goes into your CPF account and constitute your pension savings.
          But part of the CPF contribution can be used to pay for housing, or even for investment in approved shears etc. (Basically forced saving scheme)

          When will you arrive???

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            Re: This is Singapore

            Thanks so much for that simple to understand clarification. Interesting to learn.

            Sounds a whole lot better than the 46% I have to pay in tax (pluss VAT of 20-some%).
            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

            Comment


              Re: This is Singapore

              The 20% max. tax bracket is for those having a taxable income of over SGD 250,000/year only. (NOK 1.1 Mill.)

              Here is a link to IRAS for more detailed questions: http://iras.gov.sg/irasHome/page01.aspx?id=88
              Last edited by ombugge; December 7th, 2011, 16:25.

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                Re: This is Singapore

                Here is a copy of a post I made some time ago:
                There is a third way, which is somewhere between the private health care and insurance of the US and the socialized welfare system of Scandinavia.
                Here in Singapore we have a system know as CPF and run by the Central Provident Fund Board, which is Government appointed. It is a forced savings scheme, where the Employee pay 20% of his salary and the Employer an even part (Actually the Employer contribution is now 16% due to the global downturn) This is similar to the 401K scheme in the US in many ways, as the monies goes to individual accounts, not into a big pot like in the socialized systems.
                The CPF contribution can be used to pay housing loans, investment in approved found etc. and finally to pay your pension. The account holder earn interest on his/her balance every month, which at the moment is above market rate for savings account in the banks.

                There is also a compulsory Medisave scheme, which can be used to cover most of the cost in case of hospitalization but not for Polyclinic or private doctor visits for minor illnesses.

                In addition we have Medishield and Medicare schemes, which is voluntary and run by the Insurance companies, but premium can be deducted from your Medisave account. Although privately run the Government is keeping a watchful eye on how the schemes are operated. Any attempt of exploitation by the Insurance companies will exclude them from the schemes.

                The monies held on account by the CPF Board are used to finance public housing though the Housing Development Board (HDB).
                85% of Singapore citizen own their own flats in HDB-run estates. They receive a first time grant to cover their down-payment. Their mortgage is paid for from their CPF account.

                When a person reach 55 he/she can withdraw his/her CPF funds, except what is in the Special Account, which is set aside for pension payment later.
                When a person dies the balance of the account belongs to the family, or whoever the person has willed his/her estate to, not to the Government.

                I know anything that smacks of Government control or "lack of freedom" goes against the grain of the American psyche, but this is a system that has work well for Singapore and is NOT Socialism.

                Here is a link to a brief description of the CPF scheme if anybody should want to learn more: http://www.asiabizservices.com/singa...f-information/

                Comment


                  Re: This is Singapore

                  Back in a not too hot Singapore, from a not too cold Norway. (When we left, that is)

                  We are experiencing a strong NE Monsoon this year. Here is what it looked like when we reached home in the early morning of 29. Jan.:

                  At 0800 hrs.The sun is about to break through and creep above the buildings.

                  In the afternoon we had the customary squall:


                  Thereafter a cloudy evening:


                  You know you are home when back in our friendly neighbourhood coffeshop:
                  Last edited by ombugge; February 2nd, 2012, 12:05.

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                    Re: This is Singapore

                    In another thread I promised to try to take some pictures of this year's CNY decorations in Chinatown. Since I'm a man that keeps his promises, most of the time, we went to Chinatown yesterday.

                    Here is the end portal in New Bridge Road, viewed against the setting sun:


                    And a daylight view along Newbridge Road towards People's Park:

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                      Re: This is Singapore

                      Back after sunset to get some pictures of the light-up.
                      This is from the parallel street to Newbridge Road, Eu Tong Seng Street:


                      The trees on the divider between them is also decorated with lights:


                      As is some of the shop houses along the main road:


                      As well as the newer Shopping Centres:


                      And the side streets into Chinatown:
                      Last edited by ombugge; February 2nd, 2012, 12:35.

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                        Re: This is Singapore

                        The Dragon Bridge across both roads is of cause a main attraction in this Dragon year. Here seen from the East:


                        The star of the show adorns the bridge on either sides:






                        Last edited by ombugge; February 2nd, 2012, 12:36.

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                          Re: This is Singapore

                          Even the covered walkway across the bridge is adorned with lights:


                          The streets of Chinatown is packed with people, tourists and locals:

                          This is from Temple Street.

                          Some tourists taking it easy and enjoying a traditional Chinese meal at Chinatown Heritage Centre:

                          Comment


                            Re: This is Singapore

                            A view from the Dragon Bridge towards West looks fairly dull:


                            But looking East we come to the main attraction of this year's decorations, a very large Dragon at the divider, near the corner with Upper Cross Street:


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                              Re: This is Singapore

                              The tail is almost touching Dragon Bridge:


                              The gap between first and second arch look a bit steep to me, but maybe not for a mythical "animal" like the Dragon:




                              The head looks furious, but at least it is not blowing fire:

                              This is a Water Dragon year, not a Fire Dragon year.

                              That ends the report from this year's CNY decorations in Chinatown.
                              They will remain in place until the end of the CNY celebrations, which is the first full moon of the year.

                              CNY 1st day falls on a new moon, but because there is an extra moon (month) thrown in every so often, it always fall in January or February by the Gregorian calender. Hence it is also known as the Spring Festival in China.

                              If you want to know more about the Chinese calender, here is a link: http://www.webexhibits.org/calendars...r-chinese.html

                              By the way, we have just entered year 4710 by Chinese counting. (Does that put things in perspective??)

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                                Re: This is Singapore

                                It is not only in Chinatown you find CNY decorations.
                                In Orchard Road individual shops and Malls put up their own decorations. (Some may be re-cycled from the X-mas decorations)

                                This is from outside Mandarin Hotel in Orchard Road:


                                And here is another tradition, Pussywillow imported from Taiwan or China is used to make a nice decoration at Albert Court:


                                This decorated trishaw is not exactly a tradition, but worthy of a picture, I think:
                                Last edited by ombugge; February 2nd, 2012, 14:07.

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