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    #16
    Eastern Anchorage, 1972:


    Eastern Anchorage 1987:


    Eastern Anchorage today:

    (Singapore Flyer and Marina Barrage also in pic)

    Singapore River & Boat Quay, 1960s:


    Same today:

    Only river cruise boats in activity now. (Electric powered, since this is now a fresh water reservoire)

    Comment


      #17
      To continue the thread about Singapore Port.
      Singapore Cruise Centre as seen from the Sentosa Cable Car:


      A familiar sight for those who have arrived in Singapore by ship, especially if going to the shipyards in Tuas area. Sultan Shoal Light House:


      A not so common sight in Singapore, a twister (water sprout):


      Keppel Shipyard in Telok Blangha, 1970:

      Santosa and Western Anchorage in the background

      The Main dry dock at Keppel Shipyard, 1975:

      The ship in dock is one of the Barber Line ships, probably belonging to Fernley & Eger, Oslo

      Smaller dry dock at Keppel Shipyard 1970:

      The tanker in the nearest dock belonged to Onassis' American subsidiary.

      The same area 2007:

      The Main Dock is still there but now used for recreation. A bridge and marine has been developed since then.

      Here is today's Keppel Shipyard, Tuas:


      Container vessel entering the yard, 2005:


      Keppel Benoi Yard:

      Formerly Hitachi Shipyard.

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        #18
        Keppel FELS Rig building yard: (The world's largest rig builder)

        Note the 4 Jack-up hulls under construction in the Dock, together with an old semi-sub. rig being given a total upgrade. Another 5 J/Ups under outfitting and a Floating Production platform being readied for loading to a HLC for transport to GOM.

        Jurong Shipyard, Pu.Simulan at the very beginning, 1969:


        Same yard today:


        Jurong Shipyard, Tg. Kling as completed 1970:

        Belong to Sembcorp Marine.

        Same yard today:

        Belong to Sembcorp Marine.

        PPL rig building yard:

        Belong to Sembcorp Marine.

        Sembawang Shipyard, 1971:

        Former Royal Navy Yard.

        Sembawang Shipyard today:

        Belong to Sembcorp Marine.

        Across the Johor Strait, MMHE Shipyard, Malaysia:

        With a Syncro Lift for up to Panamax size ships.

        Also across Johor Strait, Johor Port, Pasir Gudang, Malaysia:

        Comment


          #19
          Loyang Offshore Base, Changi:


          10 Offshore vessels moored "side-by-side" at Loyang Base some years ago:


          Changi reclaimed land and Naval Base:

          Stand by for future Port development.

          "Numerous" small shipyards and fabrication yards at Tuas Basin, Gul Basin and Benoi Basin:


          View of Tuas Basin:


          More small yards in Pandan, Penjuru and Shipyard Road, Jurong.
          This is the entrance to Pandan River:


          I think that should do for a presentation of Singapore Port and Shipyards for the time being.

          Comment


            #20
            Absolutely spell-binding!

            I have now rated this thread "Excellent" !
            With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

            Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
            Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

            Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by pakarang View Post
              Absolutely spell-binding!

              I have now rated this thread "Excellent" !
              Thanks for that Pakarang. I will post some more of the "before and after" pics from Singapore, mainly because it is a trip down memory lane for me and I hope others enjoy to see the development of Singapore from a colonial backwater in the 1950s and 60s to a thriving metropolis as it is today.
              I hope others will enjoy it as well.

              To go a little OT; The large grey vessel seen in the last pic of my last post is the "Glen Braveheart", ex RNAF "Sir Lancelot". (Now no longer in existence. BU 2008 in Bangladesh):


              The reason I mention that is that my Father-in-Law, Capt. A.J.Walker was Master of her back in the 1960s, while she was manned by personnel from British India Steamship Company and stationed in Hong Kong, Singapore or Aden.

              He celebrated his 85th Birthday yesterday and is still going strong, so this post is in his honour.(I'll send him a copy by e-mail)

              Comment


                #22
                Incredible photographs!

                My wife and I are thinking of going to Vietnam next year. At first I thought of stopping in Singapore for a day or two but I get the feeling that it would be just a tease. I need to plan a week or two.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                  Incredible photographs!

                  My wife and I are thinking of going to Vietnam next year. At first I thought of stopping in Singapore for a day or two but I get the feeling that it would be just a tease. I need to plan a week or two.
                  A lot of Guide Books etc. has the same notion; 2-3 days is enough in Singapore. You go to Santosa, Jurong Bird Park and take in the Night Safari at the Zoo, China Town and Little India, the rest is spent shopping in Orchard Road and eating at Newton Circus.

                  I have lived here for more than 40 years and still find new and interesting places and things to see, or old places that has survived the onslaught of development.

                  I like to trace the original coastline and seen all the new dry land that has been created since 1967, when I first lived here. (The land area has grown by something like 50-60 sq.km. and is still growing)
                  I intend to post some pics and maps to illustrate this, when time permits.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Singapore - old and new

                    I started this thread with a pics from Peoples Park as I remember it from my first visit here. Now 50 years ago, more or less to the day>

                    I was a regular visitor to Singapore from 1959 - 62, when on the Europe - Far East trade with Wil.Wilhelmsen ships. Singapore was still a British Colony, but Self-governing from 1959, until it joined to form Malaysia in 1962. Singapore was thrown out of Malaysia in 1965 and became an independent nation 09. Aug. that year.

                    One of the things I remember best from that time is being held "captive" in the Norwegian Seamen's Church for several hours while there were fighting going on between Chinese, Malays and Indians on some vacant land just outside. A Policemen made sure we did not leave the safety of the premises until they had control of the situation. (I cannot remember exactly which year it was though)

                    Here is a pic showing the vacant land and Shenton Way. The Norwegian Seamen's Church was in the low building just to the right passed the round-about and beside Connell House, which was the British Mission to Seamen:

                    VERY different from today's Singapore, known for it's racial harmony.
                    The last major race riots was before independence in 1964, with some minor incidents in 1969, when Malaysia suffered major riots.

                    The old picture above was taken from top of Asia Insurance Building sometime early 1960s, but development of the area around Shenton Way didn't really start before 1970.

                    Here are two pics taken from Shenton Way a few days ago:


                    You cannot see it is the same place. Some of the tall office blocks are in their second reincarnation, but Asia Insurance Building still remains, now as high end Serviced Apartments. (The yellowish building on the right in the last pic)

                    Asia Insurance building was "Singapore's sky line" as seen from the sea with it's 17 floors, but I don't have a good pics from there though.
                    Here is a pics taken from Collyer Quay in late 1960s:

                    The company I worked for from 1970-73 had their offices on the top three floors of AIB at that time.

                    And here is a pics of AIB taken a few days ago:


                    This one shows AIB from a different angle:

                    (With reflection of Republic Plaza (70 Floors) in the glass facade of the nearest building, which is part of the new Down Town, now under construction)

                    The only "original" building still standing in this area is La Pa Sat Market. (The octagonal building seen in the old pic)
                    It was made in Glasgow, disassembled, shipped to Singapore and erected sometime in the 1880s. Used as a "Wet Market".

                    In 1980s it was disassembled again, repaired and reassembled. Now used as a Food Court:



                    A prime example of British Wrought Iron buildings of the time.
                    Last edited by ombugge; April 16th, 2014, 14:23.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      The current Norwegian, or maybe it's called Scandinavian now, Seamens Church I recall as being on the top of a hill now.....is that right?

                      The address 300 Pasir Panjang comes to my mind....
                      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Cracked Chili Crab at Lao Pa Sat!! With pitchers and pitchers of beer! What a fun evening my mom and I had with my cousins there. We would have never gone if my cousin hadn't suggested it and I'm so glad we did.

                        You seem to know where ALL the Seamens Churches are, Jan-Olav.....

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by pakarang View Post
                          The current Norwegian, or maybe it's called Scandinavian now, Seamen's Church I recall as being on the top of a hill now.....is that right?

                          The address 300 Pasir Panjang comes to my mind....
                          Very right. Here is a pics of the present Norwegian/Swedish Church on top of the hill:


                          And this is the original at Prince Edward's Lane:

                          The building was shared with Flying Angle Mission to Seafarers. This end belonged to them.

                          This is the former Norwegian part:


                          The two pics above is taken after the building was taken over by Singapore Armed Forces in 1972 and used as the first SAF Club.

                          The Church was temporarily in a rented bungalow near Keppel Shipyard, before moving to the present premises sometime in the mid/late 1970s.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by ehp View Post
                            Cracked Chili Crab at Lao Pa Sat!! With pitchers and pitchers of beer! What a fun evening my mom and I had with my cousins there. We would have never gone if my cousin hadn't suggested it and I'm so glad we did.
                            Since you referred to "Cracked Chili Crab" I assume you were given nut crackers as a tool to do so? This is something that was brought in to Singapore by somebody in the Norwegian colony.

                            In the late 1960s/early 1970s it was more or less "compulsory" for members of the Norwegian colony to participate in Sunday trips to the Southern Island, put on by the various Ship Chandlers vying for business.

                            The trip would end at Seaside Hotel on the West Coast, where there would be a a big batch of Chili Crabs consumed, appropriately washed down with Anchor Beer. (Tiger came later)

                            Cracking the Crabs with your teethes, or ballpoint hammer, was not very rational, therefore someone took on themselves to bring back nut crackers when they went to Norway on holiday, which was "donated" to the restaurant, thus starting a now common trend at most Seafood restaurants where they serve Chili or Black Pepper Crabs.

                            What happened to Seaside Hotel? It is long gone and the site is literally miles from the nearest seaside.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Actually, it came chopped up in pieces-- and was DELICIOUS!!!!! and Tiger!!!

                              I wish I had a photo of my mom diving in to one....she wears her fingernails very long and coral-red colored!! Very elegantly dressed lady with chili sauce all over her drinking beer--- it was FANTASTIC!!!!!!!

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Singapore - Orchard Road

                                Time for another installment of the Singapore Story.
                                This time of an area EVERY tourist and visitor is familiar with, ORCHARD ROAD, the primary shopping street of Singapore.

                                Here is a view from the corner of Orchard Road and Scotts Road abt. 1970:

                                Mandarin Hotel was under construction, but most of the area was as it had been during the 1960s

                                Here is the same view today: (From a slightly diff. angle. Same corner)


                                The most prominent building in this part of Orchard Road was C.K.Tang's Department Store:


                                It is still on the same location:

                                Now part of a large building, also housing Marriott Hotel:


                                A large open drainage canal run down along one side of Orchard Road. Here on a dry day:


                                And here after a heavy downpour:

                                It was not unusual for this area to flood, especially during the NE Monsoon. It was also quite common to read about somebody drowning in this drain at that time.

                                The drain is still there, but now under the main pedestrian mall along Orchard Road:

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