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    Looking downstream towards Robertson Bridge.

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      Here you can see the river side of the green coloured warehouses photographed earlier from the road.

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        The pedestrian Robertson Bridge.


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              View back across Robertson Bridge towards the River View Hotel.

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                  Last edited by Seagull; October 16th, 2010, 20:01.

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                    Many of the riverside buildings, both old and new, are restaurants, cafes and bars, so perhaps this is a good moment to pause before continuing our walk!


                    Next instalment :- a very colourful bridge.

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                      Fantastic report from Singapore!!
                      I look at the images with great interest, and after studying them all for a while, I can't help wondering:
                      Where's all the grafitti, where's all that darn tagging....?? Where's the trash on the street that we are too used to in this part of the world??
                      Are youth very different in Singapore compared to the youth in the "west" or are there simply one police for every youth down there...?

                      Other than starting such thoughts, thanks again for this report, Cecilia!
                      "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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                        I just can't get my mind to understand how you got to see all that in such a short time: you must have been exhausted at the end of each day!

                        Brilliant images from this most fantastic city.
                        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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                          Originally posted by pakarang View Post
                          I just can't get my mind to understand how you got to see all that in such a short time....
                          YOU should definitely be able to understand . . . how was it you described your own summer trip? – oh yes, now I remember -“ intensive speed-sightseeing” you called it!

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                            Maybe I can answer these questions.
                            Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
                            Fantastic report from Singapore!!
                            I look at the images with great interest, and after studying them all for a while, I can't help wondering:
                            Where's all the graffiti, where's all that darn tagging....??
                            Simple. Tagging is strictly prohibited by law in Singapore and the law is enforced. It is regarded as vandalism and the punishment is jail and caning, if the perpetrator is over 18.
                            Still, we do have some high profile cases. The last was when a Brit and a Swiss "professional" tagger managed to tag a MRT Train last year. They entered a depot during the night and painted their signature "McKoy Banos" on one of the carriages. Nobody noticed at first and the train actually travelled around Singapore for quite a while before somebody took a picture and posted it on the net.
                            The Brit, who apparently travelled the world to tag trains, got away but the Swiss, who lived and worked here, got arrested and punished for trespassing into a restricted area. I think he got 5 months jail and 3 strokes of the cane, but I'm not sure if he was caned.
                            Link:http://www.world-graffiti.com/2010/0...rain-graffiti/

                            Where's the trash on the street that we are too used to in this part of the world??
                            Are youth very different in Singapore compared to the youth in the "west"?
                            The difference is not that the youths here is any different from youths anywhere. Singapore, like everywhere else has rules and laws against littering and, again, they are enforced with heavy fines for first and second time offenders. Something called "corrective work order" is given to repeat offenders. They are given a broom, a plastic bag and a fluorescent vest with the letters CWO in big letters on them. Then they are assigned a busy street to clean for a few hours
                            The other difference is that there are garbage bins with an ashtray on top on just about every lamp post, and they are emptied regularly, not just put up and forgotten. I heavily trafficked areas, like Orchard Road etc., there are people sweeping, picking up debris and emptying dustbins 24 hrs. a day.

                            Or are there simply one police for every youth down there??
                            You don't see many police officers on the beat in Singapore. The number of police per 100,000 population is relatively small, relative to most big cities. But they are well equipped, well trained and non-corruptible, contrary to many other places in the world.

                            Back in 1994 there was a case of vandalism in Singapore that made world news. An American teenager was convicted of having spray painted several cars, among them that of a High Court judge, and sentenced to the minimum punishment of 4 months jail and six strokes of the cain. This made uproar in USA and the President of Singapore reduced the sentence to four strokes as a show of respect for President Clinton, who had intervened on behalf of the American youth.
                            A lot of Americans were up in arm and the normal media frenzy, with non-factual reports resulted, but there was also a lot of positive reactions to the punishment and would like to see the US itroducing corporal punishment for such crimes.

                            In one report Singapore was described as a "Police State", whereupon a well known US commentator wrote something like this;
                            "Singapore is about the same size, and has approx. the same population as Los Angeles, but the number of murders and violent crimes are less then 1/10th, yet the number of Police Officers is less than half. Now, which place is a Police State???" (Freely quoted from memory)
                            If you want to know more about the Micheal Fay case, here is a link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_P._Fay
                            Last edited by ombugge; October 17th, 2010, 13:36. Reason: Correction

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                              Originally posted by Seagull View Post
                              These old "Godowns" now house the very successful nightclub ZOUKS, which is world famous among the "clubbing class", I have been told.
                              There used to be Godowns like these all along Singapore River, owned by Trading Houses and even Banks. Only a few have been preserved, among them some that used to belong to EAC (Danish East Asiatic Company) and become restaurants and bars for the most parts, among the the famous Clark Quay and Boat Quay entertainment areas.

                              This is what the river looked like until well into the 1970s:

                              Now Singapore River has been turned into a fresh water reservoir, together with Marina Bay, Kallang and ***lang Rivers.
                              In the short film in an earlier post you can even see the life on the river back in the 1920s. Nothing remains the same for long here.

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                                This is absolutely marvellous isn’t it – questions answered, and all sorts of fascinating and informative commentary from ombugge. And these “then and now” reminders of the rapidity of change put my present day experiences into perspective.

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