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What place is this?

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    Re: What place is this?

    We can see four mills. How many more are there???

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      Re: What place is this?

      Just coming back from vacations I am glad to see that this thread is still a big brain storming!
      I suggest Ralf invit us in Germany to look at this strange toy.
      Anyway,nice to join you again.

      Comment


        Re: What place is this?

        How many more would you like, Ombugge? I would have thought just the four shown, in view of Ralf's comment about the rotational direction of each.
        Ivy

        "To thine own self be true.......
        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

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          Re: What place is this?

          I didn't refresh before posting. Welcome back, Yves - join the head-scratchers. Me, I'm off to make a cuppa.
          Ivy

          "To thine own self be true.......
          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

          Comment


            Re: What place is this?

            Yes, it is a correct compilation of all information i gave.
            And you assumed also right, no cleansing operation.

            If i would show you the next picture in the production process, you will immediately recognize the purpose.

            It is a very traditional craftmanship, which almost disappeared today.
            In the mid ages each country had hundred of such mills, but today materials and production process changed completely.

            In this mill they use a modernised production method, which creates these drilled columns as first step.

            Well....there is a secret about mills, you don't even see in Holland!
            Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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              Re: What place is this?

              Take a stone column - do something with it.

              But what! I can only imagine that you'd take slices out of the core - which gives you little stoney discs.

              What is made of little stoney discs? Haven't a clue.
              Cheers,

              Mark.

              www.pologlover.co.uk

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                Re: What place is this?

                Do they work with one type of stone only? Or do they use several different types?
                Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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                  Re: What place is this?

                  Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
                  Do they work with one type of stone only? Or do they use several different types?
                  I don't think Ralf said "stone", he said "base material"?? I assume that is different from "base metals???

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                    Re: What place is this?

                    Umm.... okay, let's throw in another guess. Ralf, are these polishing mills? Do they polish the material after it's been cut and shaped by the main factory?
                    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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                      Re: What place is this?

                      Mark was right with his guess. The material is indeed stone.
                      And to answer Steves question: Yes, they work with different types of stones.
                      But the main purpose is not polishing the material, although this is a very nice collateral effect.

                      You are beginning to solve it now, i think.
                      Be aware, the original question is: "What place is this?" so after solving the "how", you have to find out the "where"...
                      Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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                        Re: What place is this?

                        Ralf talks about the base material being processed in the mill in a later stage of the production chain. But the base material lies unused at the moment, so what exactly is the mill doing right now, and to what?
                        Ivy

                        "To thine own self be true.......
                        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                        Comment


                          Re: What place is this?

                          Originally posted by Ralf__ View Post
                          You are beginning to solve it now, i think.
                          I am glad you added the 'i think' on the end of that statement Ralf. I am still totally confused!

                          We know this is not somesort of working museum or simply a display. So there must be a good reason why this method is still being used. I can only presume that the end product is sought after because it's been produced in this fashion, giving it a unique finish or texture that is hard to reproduce by modern methods? Would i be correct with that statement?

                          Even if i am correct with that line of thinking, i am still no nearer to working out just what the product could be. And without working that out, i do not think we will be able to work out where this place is.
                          Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                          Comment


                            Re: What place is this?

                            In addition to Steve's question; Is the end product whatever is milled off the stone "base material" (i.e a powder, or something similar) or is it whatever is left of the stone column???

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                              Re: What place is this?

                              You should not overestimate the end product. As said before, there are meanwhile more modern methods and material used with perfect results.

                              The fascination here is the beauty of the different stone materials and how exact the product is coming out of such a simple production.

                              I would not say that the product is sought after, but i guess no one, who has seen this production, leaves without buying the product. At least, the miller has no fulltime job here, it is just a hobby.

                              Go back to that second picture and try to find out what you would have to do with that stone column until it ends up in a mill.

                              There is a clear clue in that picture.
                              Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

                              Comment


                                Re: What place is this?

                                Originally posted by Ralf__ View Post
                                You should not overestimate the end product. As said before, there are meanwhile more modern methods and material used with perfect results.

                                The fascination here is the beauty of the different stone materials and how exact the product is coming out of such a simple production.

                                I would not say that the product is sought after, but i guess no one, who has seen this production, leaves without buying the product. At least, the miller has no fulltime job here, it is just a hobby.

                                Go back to that second picture and try to find out what you would have to do with that stone column until it ends up in a mill.

                                There is a clear clue in that picture.
                                It looks like there's a second cut from above - i.e. another circular cut in the opposite plane to the first one.

                                Can't imagine what you do with stone balls though! (No rude comments please).
                                Cheers,

                                Mark.

                                www.pologlover.co.uk

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