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Mercedes benz '' HIGHWAY CRUISER''

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  • janihudi
    replied
    i was planning for the easter weekend to spraypaint the wheel rims and wheel hubs,
    and some more to make the truck ready for a truckshow.
    paint ,check
    wheel nut machine and stuff to connect,check
    to the truckwash,check ,but closed
    to a Volvo garage,check,but cleaner was broken.
    make a appointment with Arjan Westerlaken to spray them,check.
    looking for the wheater forecast for dry and Sunny weather,check.
    early out of my bed,for remove the rims,check
    BUT WHO IS EXPECTING SNOW IN APRIL.
    and screwed up the paintwork.
    no fluff yesterday or this morning,but when we started to spray the paint al that damned fluff came up.







    i hate mother nature

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  • janihudi
    replied
    wll not really,i removed them to spraypaint the wheel rims and the wheelhubs.

    6 rims x 10 nuts,makes 60x hard work,but i'm not afraid forsome work.



    but then again,why should i do it the hard way,if i can do it the easy way.
    with a wheelnut machine

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  • janihudi
    replied
    damn,they stole my rims this night.



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  • wherrygirl
    replied
    Well, so long as it was good, strong coffee it was probably just what the battery needed.

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  • janihudi
    replied
    did check the battery meter,before i started today,now worries,even now when i was ready the battery is 3/4 full.and including the 2 cups of coffee Wesley made.

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  • wherrygirl
    replied
    Tomorrow the HC won't start - flat battery!
    Those Neckerman flaps do look smart, don't they? It'll be good when you get them properly fixed.
    When Clipper asked what one object was in one of your photos, I misunderstood what he was looking at. The bit I wondered about I now know is the fifth wheel. I didn't know what that meant at first but I've watched those two videos and now I understand better. Thank you for giving the links, Clipper, I've learnt a little more.
    I often watch Ice Road Truckers, or the Outback one when it is on, so if they start checking things underneath when there is a problem I must watch carefully. I always do, but now I might just recognise something! The only thing is, you don't normally see them doing normal things like coupling or uncoupling, just the exciting problem bits where they're stranded somewhere and need help - fast.
    The recent Outback one showed the clouds of dust raised by the first truck in a small convoy, and it reminded me of the time when I was in Oz and we got caught behind a truck on an unmetalled road. How John knew where he was going I don't know, even the truck was invisible. But he and his wife are used to it. Very few roads are metalled where we were even though they may be what we might call trunk roads. Come to that, there are only two kinds of road in the bush, those made of dust or tracks to homesteads which are just lines in the ground made by previous vehicles. All good fun.

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  • janihudi
    replied

    Originally posted by Clipper View Post

    I should have guessed about the axle lifter. That makes sense out of the connecting bars and stuff down there amongst the suspension. The incredible thing is that all the extra expense is repaid in reduced fuel consumption when you are running empty or lightly loaded .
    and a longer live for your tyres,the extra steering axle than offcourse

    Originally posted by Clipper View Post
    After seeing the videos, I understand why you say "legpower" Thijs, because normally the fifth wheel adjustment is made by driving the tractor with kingpin engaged and trailer brakes applied, right?
    yes you're right,but it wassn't a easy job with the legpower.but looking at the video's there is nothing of what he said that i do,but that is the differend for when to learn and a driver with 29 years of experience.

    Originally posted by Clipper View Post
    The videos don't mention the weight indicator or the menu system in the cab. I can see how this is vital to making a good decision as to where the fifth wheel should be located.
    it's not as much for the weight controle,as more for narrowing the gab between cab and trailer,less wind between it,so economical better driving.
    that i have such a fift wheel is because of a 3 axle truck has a longer chassis than a 2 axle truck.
    we (TSI our company) have more 2 axle trucks as 3 axle.for ''normal'' loads (holland 50 tons,Germany 40 tons and Belgium 44 tons) a 2 axle truck is enough with a 3 axle trailer,but for 50 tons you need a 6 axle vehicle a 3 by 3 (3 truck and 3 trailer) or a 2 by 4 axle (2 truck and a 4 trailer) and i go even heavyer.
    so the chassis for a 2 axles truck (short chassis) have also be connected behind my 3 axle (longer chassis) truck,and thatswhy we have a adjustable fift wheel.

    Originally posted by Clipper View Post
    I thought it was all about cruising on motorways but there's so much for a truck driver to know!!
    when i have a ''normal'' chassis,the driving issn't that good,the most of the weight is laying at the back of the truck,so it feels just as when you trow 50 tiles in the back of your car,bad driving

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  • janihudi
    replied
    it's so much easier to work at when you have 220volts with you,for the drilling and grindingtool.



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  • janihudi
    replied
    mounted the mudflaps,and removed them again.
    have to weld new longer bolds on the brecketts,so that i can place 2 nuts behind them.



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  • Clipper
    replied
    Thank you for the great answers Thijs.

    I should have guessed about the axle lifter. That makes sense out of the connecting bars and stuff down there amongst the suspension. The incredible thing is that all the extra expense is repaid in reduced fuel consumption when you are running empty or lightly loaded.

    It's amazing just how much knowledge truck drivers must have that the rest of us don't have. As always, YouTube is a good source of information. These two videos are very informative, and there are many more :





    After seeing the videos, I understand why you say "legpower" Thijs, because normally the fifth wheel adjustment is made by driving the tractor with kingpin engaged and trailer brakes applied, right?

    The videos don't mention the weight indicator or the menu system in the cab. I can see how this is vital to making a good decision as to where the fifth wheel should be located.

    I thought it was all about cruising on motorways but there's so much for a truck driver to know!!

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  • wherrygirl
    replied
    Thank you, Thijs, but it's OK. if I find it too high than I'll just have to move the screws on the post down a bit.

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  • janihudi
    replied
    what about a image?????

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  • wherrygirl
    replied
    Originally posted by janihudi View Post
    some extra screws aren't weaken the post that much,so that wont be the troubble,specially in tough wood.
    No, I meant getting them in, pushing hard against the post, might loosen it. I'd have to get a strong man in from the street to push against it from the opposite side!
    maybe to consider to screw in a woodbolt,it's a screw but with the head of a bolt.
    Ah, but then I couldn't hang the line on the bolt. The line is in a circular case about 5cm. thick and a fitting at the side has two holes, each like a figure of eight but not closed at the centre, so at the top is a small hole opening into the lower, larger one. You place the case so that the large hole in the fitting slips over the screw then pull it down and the screw shank settles securely into the top hole. Oh, I'm laughing as I write this, it sounds so complicated but without a drawing it takes ages to explain.
    So a bolt would not be the answer here, too big a head.
    Anyway, it's done now. If I shrink I'll have to find another tile!

    Thank you, Clipper, for asking what was beneath that large cover. I was wondering, too.

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  • janihudi
    replied
    i believe and thought that the mix for cement is 1:1.
    some extra screws aren't weaken the post that much,so that wont be the troubble,specially in tough wood.
    maybe to consider to screw in a woodbolt,it's a screw but with the head of a bolt.
    then you can place a bit on top and screw it in with a ratchet wrench,gooing so much easier.

    yes i know that you ment about the nutcase.

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  • wherrygirl
    replied
    Oh, don't worry about it. Considering what you have achieved on the HC over the past months - including that lovely little table which you took such trouble over - then you must agree that you've done wonders, Thijs. As far as measuring things to make them fit is concerned, it is so easy for it to go not quite right. The other week I went across to the woodyard and bought a length of 75x75 timber to make my new washing-line post because the old one had rotted and fallen down. About 40-45 years ago I erected 3 in a triangle shape and over the years have replaced two. This was the third. I mentioned them a while ago and laughed because I had once misjudged the amount of mix needed.
    So this time I bought a bag of cement and sand (packed separately), came home and on a sunny day got going on the job. I sanded it down first to smooth out a few rough patches, then measured up to fix a couple of screws near the top on which to hang the retractable washing line when I need it. Put the screws in, leaving just the head and a small bit of shank showing, then started mixing the cement. I had only a small piece of hardboard on which to mix so could only do it in small amounts. I got half-way, slow going because I only ever grew 2 hands and could have done with a third, so I had to prop up the post each time while I mixed the next batch.
    And - guess what! Just as the post was beginning to be stable I realised I had misjudged my cement quantities. It was so long since I did the last post. The day was really hot, I was hot and bothered and saying all sorts of bad things to myself. I hurried out, got into the car, up to the shop and bought another bag. I rushed into the garden and thank goodness the post was OK and the cement had not dried out. I finished the job in the end and was reasonably pleased. The only thing is that, despite my careful measuring, the screws at the top were just a little high for me to fix the retractable line on each time.
    So I found an old flat tile and placed that on the soil as a little step. I don't want to fix new screws as it is tough wood and I'd have to push hard to get them in. It might weaken the post.

    So I didn't call you a nutcase because it went wrong. I called you a nutcase because the way you write about what you are doing, especially if there are problems, just makes me giggle. It makes me imagine you standing there swearing to yourself, heaving a great sigh, gulping down a coffee then starting all over again.
    You'll get it all done in the end. You always do.

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