Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Norsk Jernbanemuseum - Norwegian Railway Museum in the city of Hamar

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Norsk Jernbanemuseum - Norwegian Railway Museum in the city of Hamar

    One day in our camper van tour, we (or rather I) visited Norsk Jernbanemuseum in Hamar.
    It was a very informative and impressive museum, both indoors and outdoors, but I really missed two things: trains and equipment from the 1960s and 70s (like NOHAB Di.3 locomotive) and more "stuff" for adults in the museum shop.
    Anywho..., here are some photos taken with my Pentax K-1 II with a temporary APS-C lense due to the fact that my full frame lense got broken just a day before the tour.

    IMGP3698 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    One of many steam locomotives in the collection
    IMGP3677 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    The drivers place in that locomotive
    IMG_6053 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    And how did they brush snow and stuff off the rails in the old days? Well, a couple of bundles of birch would do
    IMGP3679 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    Interior of royal coach nr. 557 from Kongsvingerbanen railway, built in GB 1865
    IMGP3686 2 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    Locomotive nr. 470 from Fried. Krupp A.G., Essen in 1940, a model 49C. In use with NSB, the Norwegian Railway, and known as "Dovregubben", largest steam locomotive ever used in Norway (we had 7 of these running).
    The model 49c had a service tonnage of 153,1 tonns.
    IMGP3792 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    Drivers "office" on board "Dovregubben". He might do the classic 'Hand ballet' when things started to get busy
    IMGP3784 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    Electric locomotive EL. 1 built 1922
    IMGP3709 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

    #2
    Of course, the engineers had their own inspection cars.
    This is Inspection Car NSB C-m 18207, built by Armstrong Whitworth in 1911. (AW ended their production of cars in 1914).
    NSB claims that this might well be the last remaining car from AW, and it was bought and rebuilt for railway inspection by NSB in 1924. End of service for this car was back in the 1940s.
    IMG_6056 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    And the only moving train on the site is "Tertitten", and since the ticket price is included in the museum ticket, you can jump on this one each 30 minutes
    IMGP3800 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    I have a few more from the museum, but not just ready yet.
    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

    Comment


      #3
      This green locomotive was the very first one on Norways first railway, which opened 1st September 1854 between Oslo and Eidsvoll
      IMGP3659 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

      Old Ilseng station building
      IMGP3653 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

      From the outdoor area at the museum
      ​​​​​​IMGP3652 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr
      "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

      Comment


        #4
        A wonderful report and excellent photography, Sterkoder, as expected from a man of your caliber.

        I love the way you have processed and edited your images, you have gained a certain style that I think is really great.

        Loved the bit about the inspection car.... how peculiar!
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

        Comment


          #5
          Lots of goodies, and nice pictures!

          Comment


          • Sterkoder
            Sterkoder commented
            Editing a comment
            Thank you, Tommi.
            I should also like to see the classic Di.3 there, and EL.13, but they were in a locomotive stable at Hamar station, closed to the public.
            But thankful enough, they are all operative and in use almost every day during summer.
            And as in all mechanical device; frequent use is the best maintenance.
        Working...
        X