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  • Sterkoder
    started a topic This is Norway - all places without their own thread.

    This is Norway - all places without their own thread.

    Drove out to Averøy thursday last week to do some lawn mowing. Didn't care to travel by carferry, so I drove via Eide and Atlanterhavsveien...., being much nicer and taking just about the same time from my home.

    That said, there are many pictures from the Altanterhavsveien here, so this time I just want to upload some from Norways nr. 1 "stone community" Eide.
    In this small community there are several factories and smaller companies making all sort of things out of stone, from gravestones to ......, I don't know what. Possibly much easier to mention what they don't make

    This is Eide pictured from south looking towards north, and the Atlanterhavsveien is situated out the fjord to the right in the picture


    This is the statue "Steinblomst" (Stoneflower)


    In the Eide/Visnes area they also have a huge marble and lime mine.
    The equipment they use are HUGE!




    The size don't show too well on a picture, but notice the ladder to climbe to get to the drivers seat

  • pakarang
    replied
    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
    If you were impressed with yourself walking up and down the 418 steps to Fjellstua in Aalesund you should try the 6130 Midsundtrappene:
    https://www.visitmr.com/til-topps-i-...SAAEgLNM_D_BwE
    Oh, my goodness, that is something I would love to climb! Duly noted for a later trip.

    Leave a comment:


  • ombugge
    replied
    If you were impressed with yourself walking up and down the 418 steps to Fjellstua in Aalesund you should try the 6130 Midsundtrappene:
    https://www.visitmr.com/til-topps-i-...SAAEgLNM_D_BwE

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    Quote: "Thank you so very much for staying with us and for letting me and all of us, take a part in your journey".

    It's my pleasure, Jan-Olav.
    Yes, there are this and that happening on that big bad thing called Facebook, but once CVF, always CVF.

  • pakarang
    replied
    Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
    And do you think the interior looks like any other café in this country..., cold and sterile? Take a look
    IMG_6010 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr
    What an amazing trip-report, Sterkoder.... I loved each and every image, but I need to pick a favourite, and that's the one above. The filter and editing there makes this stand out to me, and I love the "feel" it gives me.

    I'm really impressed how you have grown with us here at CVF, Sterkoder... from ten years ago (or so), you have become really good at your game. I admire your evolution over time, and you do have a great sense of photography. Thank you so very much for staying with us and for letting me and all of us, take a part in your journey.


    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you, Tommi :-)

    As for the elderly in Sweden, we have the same "thing" going here in Norway.
    The advantage with a camper van is the freedom, freedom to go other places than within a city parking space, stacked almost on top of each other.
    This is done only from time to time when the female members of such a tour would want to do some shopping in a different city than home.

    As for the pictures, they are all taken with my full-frame K-1 II, but with a APS-C lense. My full-frame lense is in for repair.

  • Tommi
    replied
    Such a nice potpuorri of images from your vacation.
    You seem to have found some nice spots to park the camper at. I never have understood the elderly people in Sweden, who very often park in some city near place, with just some asphalt around 20 other campers...

    Leave a comment:


  • Tommi
    commented on 's reply
    Spectacular!

  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    Oh..., I love such info. It fit into my kind of "motto": try to learn one new thing each day :-)
    Anyway, when you say Hyacinth, I think about something totally different from flowers. I think about candlelit dinners and a poor husband (haha).
    And as we are talking about Google and their translate service..., that has become a well known kind of joke in Norway.
    When someone write bad English, or talk, for that matter...., we use to say: - Been using Google Translate again? (Just a fun fact).
    Perhaps you know, but in Norway, the Harebells are totally protected and they are not allowed to pick up.

  • Seagull
    replied
    Yes, I know you always appreciate English language feedback, Svein. But in this instance it is actually far more complicated!
    Names of flowers, fruit, vegetables, fish and suchlike are always very difficult in languages because there are probably alternative local names used in different parts of the country whose language one is trying to grasp. This is understandable in very big countries like Norway, (and I am alway fascinated by such differences in Norwegian and Swedish), but it is also very true of the much smaller British Isles! It is no surprise that Google Translate is not always up to the job and that for foodstuffs and menu translation various apps abound, though with varying degrees of success (or hilarity!)

    Fortunately Carl Linnaeus can help
    The flower you photographed is:- Campanula rotundifolia

    The English name Harebell came about because it is also grows in habitats where hares are common. But there are LOTS of other traditional names - my grandmother called them Fairy Bells.

    However, although it's best to always call them Harebells in English, I have some fascinating 'bonus information' for you! They are also known as the Scottish Bluebell, so here in Scotland you/Google would actually have been correct!

    The flower that comes to mind when one says 'bluebell' in English is the botanically different flower most associated with woodlands and is:- Hyacinthoides non-scripta

    So are you now perhaps wondering what this flower is called in Scotland?
    Well, although many people would just say bluebell and that would be fine in context, the flower is frequently known here as the Wild Hyacinth!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    Appreciate you comment, thank you :-)

  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you, Cecilia..., your comment makes me humble and I feel kind of touched (as we say here, I guess the translation is 'rørt').

    I appreciate every correction to my english language. I learn that way.
    I used Google Translate to find a name for the Harebell, and they fooled me into using 'bluebell' ;-)

  • Seagull
    replied
    All four images in #321 are wonderful, and for me up there with your best ever, Svein. The beauty of that landscape and the architecture of Snøhetta have once again inspired a CVF master-photographer.

    (Oh and that delicate blue flower is known as a Harebell in English - bluebells are something different )

    Leave a comment:


  • nari
    replied
    Such dramatic colours and a sense of responsibility to look after these structures. Good work, Svein.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Some pictures from our short stop in Fagernes.
    Fagernes was a large railway stop at Valdresbanen, but since the termination of that railway in 1988, there are now only a few things left for memory, and to show visitors that the place once was contected to the rest of the country by rails.

    Here are the last train, locomotive, out of Fagernes station 31st December 1988, now back on display here
    IMGP3606 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    The locomotive and old station building
    IMGP3608 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    IMGP3602 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    Detail on the building (I personally enjoy to see the NSB logo displayed, don't like the new name Vy at all!)
    IMGP3604 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    Leave a comment:

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