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  • Sterkoder
    started a topic This is Stavanger

    This is Stavanger

    I might be blind, but since I can't find such a thread, and I've just returned from two great days in Stavanger...., I'll start one myself.
    I stayed a couple of nights at Thon Hotel Maritime in Kongsgata, and right across the Breiavatne pond, was Radisson SAS. This picture was taken from the Thon entrance/exit to the street.


    As I walked around Breiavatne, I took different pictures, and here's Thon


    I find it easy to include some parts of a tree whenever it should be appropriate


    Don't know exactly what these old houses are called, but they are in connection with the beautiful Stavanger Domkirke


    I'm heading out to the square and open space in front of Vågen, but first I just have to take more pictures including Breiavatne



  • pakarang
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you Sterkoder... yes, I've heard about Renu's Thai food a while back and followed their FB page when I returned to FB myself.

    It'll be exciting to see where Palaeng is in one year, and if we are still in business.

  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    It's several years ago, decades, that the right-wing orientated parties proclaimed that it should be easier to start a business in Norway. They wanted to kill some of the paperwork.
    When I got laid off from Swire Oilfield Services in April 2016, the first thing I did was to register a "one-man-band" company/business in photography, with the business register in Brønnøysund. I called it FotoLudvigsen (it's still alive), but during the "simple" registry work, I soon found out that I HATE such paperwork, so starting a business was a no-go for me.
    I can understand what you've been through with Palaeng, as I worked together with a guy at Swire who has a wife from Thailand. They just started 'Thai Food by Renu' near the cinema and I heard some of what they had to go through. But now, it's up and running, and they are doing good :-)
    https://www.facebook.com/Thai-food-b...9594919449028/

  • nari
    commented on 's reply
    I am rather awed by the fact such an old ship is still around, and in good condition, it seems. Looks like there have been many layers of paint on her. Norwegians seem to take great pride in preservation which adds so much to the interest in wandering around bits of the country.

  • pakarang
    commented on 's reply
    hahahahaha.... good one, ombugge!

    The story of Palaeng is the story of a lot of tears and really hard work. If there is an interest, I might write more about this in another thread, but after trying to open a take-away restaurant in downtown Trondheim, I have learned a lot of not necessarily positive things about opening and trying to do something in Norway. They say, that opening a "restaurant" (including any food related place) is the absolutely hardest things you can do in Norway.

  • ombugge
    commented on 's reply
    That is what you pay for a Barista, not what the owner of the coffee shop earn, so you'll have to think big!!
    Maybe you could get a franchising agreement with Pakarang and combine it with good authentic Thai food?? (Just a thought)

  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    In any way, my point is; it does not help to open up a coffee bar and hope to higher power that there will be customers.
    One has to create a need, be creative as to what the content of the coffee bar will be, make something happen there which make future customers curious enough to want to walk over the threshold. THEN one can serve them coffee and cakes :-)
    In this day and age it's incredible how much people are willing to pay for an experience, but it has to be something more than to just sit in a chair drinking coffee and stare out the window with a empty look to their eyes.

    But then again, after checking into what a barista earn as an average in Norway, calculated for a normal 37,5 hours week, I think I'll pass...
    (Annual NOK 337.200,- Month NOK 28.100,- Hour NOK 175,-. Then comes tax and other things deducted from the gross salary).

  • pakarang
    replied
    Very interesting about the coffee-talk, even though I started that digression. I'm very passionate about coffee, and I plan to go for a Barista course back in Thailand some time in the near future.

    I agree that niche places certainly has a place for themselves: coffee bar and art-center. There are quite a few of them around Trondheim right now, and more coming.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    Well, thanks for believing in me :-)

    Second; I'm 55 and HAVE to have a sure income to cover ugly yellow bills dropping into my mailbox every second day. (Bad argument, I know).
    If there are enough coffee loving and photo interested people in Kristiansund?
    I guess so, as Kristiansund is the Photography Capital of Norway, hosting the biggest, best and most renown photography festival in northern Europe (stated by the visiting world famous photographers, not me).
    Once I made a photo book from my two visits at the abandoned psychiatric hospital at Hjelset near Molde. I gave one to the Master photographer Morten Krogvold, and his comment (among others) was: -"Why don't you bet more on photography? Why don't you go for it?".
    My answer? Well, the bad argument from line one here....
    (I guess he also ment that I should have a go at his Step 1 Workshop in Vågå, but with a job, house, car, spouse, dog and commitments around the daily life, I can't be gone for 7 full days at over NOK 14.000,- just like that).

    Then again, there are many people just like you, telling me they kind of think I'm at the wrong shelf in life. So thanks for all your support, anyway :-)

  • ombugge
    commented on 's reply
    Hmmm..., why do I work with chain slings and rusty old containers in all kind of weather, why don't I educate myself into a barista and have a go?
    That is a good question. Why don't you??? A Coffee Bar with it's own artistic photographer as the Owner and Barista may catch on. (Provided there are enough photo interested and coffee loving people for two such places in Ballsund City)

  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you.
    I was kind of curious on how I would manage a hole week-end without my Pentax. My conclusion is that if one does not need to be artistic in anyway (play with depth of field, shutter speed, zoom and such) a mobile phone camera might be more than enough to carry :-)

  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Thank you guys! :-) As I said; they are all iPhone-pictures :-)

    About the coffee-talk; I think Jan-Olav is quite correct. But, the introduction of very good coffee in self service machines does not mean that the coffee bars HAS to shut down.
    I'm not a frequent user of such places, but I belive they have to offer more than just coffee in may versions. I mean, over (way over) mediocre service, start to cooperate with artists (painters, photographers, book writers etc.), to build a cozy environment in the bar, a place one can experience something too, (watch art, watch or gaze at photos, listen to an author read from his/her book, interviews with interesting people etc., etc.) and not only sit down and drink coffee, or latte, or whatever.

    The life is passing way fast enough to get coffee from a machine and drink it on the move too.

    Dromedar ended its service in Kristiansund, but that was for family reasons, not rent price, few customers or anything else.
    The new coffee shop, called Bar-e Kaffe Lunch og Kaffebar, cooperate with a photographer, who get to use the walls as some kind of an exhibition area, and they let him/her (I don't know who) sell pictures from the bar. (It might have changed, I have never been there).
    But this show something of what I mean; the employees MUST see the customer, each and every one, they MUST look like they are genuine interested in selling coffee, lunch or what ever to you, the service must be perfect, the locality MUST be clean, there MUST be enough electrical power points for lap-tops, mobile phones, iPads and so on and it MUST be like you really want to go back there.

    (Hmmm..., why do I work with chain slings and rusty old containers in all kind of weather, why don't I educate myself into a barista and have a go? Mohahahahahahaha )

    Leave a comment:


  • Tommi
    replied
    A nice "bouquet" of pictures from Stavanger, really enjoyed these!

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    What an awesome collection of photographs - particularly those of the old steamer Rogaland. I find it truly fascinating that we in 2018 are still able to walk the quay side and look at a ship out of another era.

    I have to agree, coffee has come a long way around the world, and in Norway. Starbucks WAS probably the best place many years ago, but they have lost their charm. Starbucks at Solsiden in Trondheim recently closed down as well, stating that they could not agree upon a rental price of the location.

    But, automatic coffee machines at for example 7-11 and Narvesen has now become so good, that they are talking a serious bite out of all coffee bars, Starbucks, Kaffebrenneriet, Dromedar and all others. I strongly believe that within the next 5-10 years, many of these places will disappear as self service machines are readily available almost everywhere, taste as good as any other place (I don't taste the difference) and a much cheaper option.

    I'm a regular at not only my own café but also a very good customer of 7-11 self service coffee machines.

    PS: The best thing seeing this update in Stavanger thread was that I also saw PoloUK's images from way back.... don't remember seeing them before! Stavanger is a great city!

    Leave a comment:


  • nari
    replied
    Starbucks started up in Canberra at quite few places - all barely lasted a couple of years. When I tried it once,I figured bilgewater would have tasted better.....

    Leave a comment:

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