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Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    I try to "run" up to Orsætra three times a week, but now, as the days get darker, I have to do this just as I come home from work.
    Today I did the walk in 26 minutes, so something must have improved.

    Here I am in the soon to set sunlight at the steep 18,6% uphill walk, covered with dead pine needles


    Nice view this afternoon. In the very far distance, we see the snowcovered Trollheimen mountains


    Decorative growth on a birch tree




    Nice to sit on a bench at Orsætra, in the silent free nature.


    And finally the sun went down behind Meekknoken mountain at Averøy.


    If anyone wonder, all the above images were taken with my iPhone camera, and all this is only 30 minutes from my home.
    I'm so happy I don't live in a city center....;-)
    Last edited by Sterkoder; October 25th, 2011, 22:25.

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  • Seagull
    replied
    Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
    ....Originally there were three trunks, but maybe someone had tried to make a sculpture or something....
    Catapult !!!!!!!!!
    Glad it’s not aimed at the path towards your house…especially with that cannon-ball-like rock in that other image!
    See, you really got my imagination going this morning!

    And I love the “mirror images”, especially #136/2

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    Originally posted by pakarang View Post
    Are you really sure that is the main reason for "almost" braking the sweat....
    Oh yes, my frind...., the walk up those 18-19% steep paths was over 30-40 minutes ago when I took those pictures, so my breath and puls were both ok.
    On a walk like this I might stumble in something on the path, work to keep balance, constantly looking for motifs, and when the tripod is left at home, sweat is the result of all this and holding my breath for longer periodes of time before pressing the camera button.

    But of course you might be on the right track: It has to cost something to move a 190 cm high and 120 kg heavy body graciously through the forest

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  • pakarang
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
    ...Started to sweat, actually)
    Are you really sure that is the main reason for "almost" braking the sweat....

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    reflection
    Ahhh...., there's the word I was looking for. Hahaha..., 'mirror images'...

    had the opportunity to go out for a walk with the family's pig
    Always thought I was the family pig here, but hey...., great to be wrong

    Thanks guys, for nice comments!!! (Yes, I struggled with the light today. Started to sweat, actually)

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  • pakarang
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    There can never be too many reflection images! These are great, and as Tommi already mentioned, there are some tricky light-conditions you have mastered well.

    Nature is wonderful, and I'm so glad you had the opportunity to go out for a walk with the family's pig

    The three rocks image is a great catch: this is what I would call nature's own painting.

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  • Tommi
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    You've had quite tricky lighting conditions there. Dusk, back light, no shadows (=low contrasts), pretty grey nature, it's not easy to capture good pictures then. You managed it all pretty good. It's also very interesting to see the nature around you.

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    I remember being up here once, about 16 years ago. As I told my better half, it would be great to take a picture of our house now that I have a proper camera and zoom lense.
    Forgot one thing though...., trees grow during 16 years(dunno)

    Anyway, as you might remember I write about ships sailing in and out Freifjorden beneath my home, from time to time, and this is only to show how close to the fjord I live.
    (If you spot something yellow in there among the green treetops, that's where)


    On the other side of the fjord, you can see a collection of hundreds of white 'things'. That's caravans permanently standing at Kvisvik Camping.
    In this image, my white terrace door on my little yellow house is visible through the trees.


    Okj, thanks for walking with me yet again, and I hope you all enjoyed it as much as me. Have a great coming week all!!!!
    Last edited by Sterkoder; October 23rd, 2011, 21:55.

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    Tried to capture the small thin line of orange from the sunset. Not quite successful...




    Mirror images are facinating.




    Starting the decent towards home, I found these rocks in the ditch. The upper one is round like a football... (Well, close anyway)

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    It might be too much with all these mirrory pictures, but hey...., the nature is so impressive


    The pinkish ray up in the clouds there are the small sign of a sunset


    A trees system of roots, from the underside. This is rather old, so it is covered with moss and everything


    Originally there were three trunks, but maybe someone had tried to make a sculpture or something. All three of us passed just five meters from it, but only "the photographer" in the group noticed it


    Time to change objective on the way back, so now I'm shooting through the 50-200mm. Motifs everywhere....

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    I usually use ISO400 or 800, but if I have to I'll gladly go up to 1600. 3200 is more of a back-up plan and the 6400 is used when nothing else will work. If I can choose, I'll choose noisy pictures over blurred pictures...
    Totally agree.
    On a daily basis I use 400 more now than before. As the following pictures from todays walk shows, the light conditions were not the best, so also this time I used 1600 and in fact 3200 a couple of times.

    I have five minutes to walk before being in the forest, and here's a marker showing where you'll end up. And before you comment anything: Yes, there are two ways to Prestmyra.


    Walking through an allé or tunnel of trees, with my better half, daughter and family dog.
    (I know it looks like we have a family pig, but the dog moved too fast for my camera settings)


    A small stream coming out of the more and more swampy pond Setervannet


    Coming up to the pond itself




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  • Tommi
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
    I read what you write with interest, Jan-Olav!
    My experience, with the Pentax, is that having shot a hole lot at ISO200 and struggling with 'this and that', I've lately used 400, struggling less.
    Now that I shot all from yesterday at 1600, they were all ok.
    The ISO itself should be the same thing, but we have remember that the number stands for the speed or sensitivity of the film or the camera, nothing else. Back in the film-days a higher speed/sensitivity meant almost certainly a more grainier image. This is also true for digital cameras, but here we are talking about noise. This noise is usually a lot less visible than on a film with the same ISO-speed. As camera sensors are developing we constantly see a decrease of noise in our digital images. Modern sensor technology have also made it possible to bump up ISO values to all time high, the most modern DSLR's are capable to use ISO's up to 6400, but honestly the most gives best pictures below 1600.
    I usually use ISO400 or 800, but if I have to I'll gladly go up to 1600. 3200 is more of a back-up plan and the 6400 is used when nothing else will work. If I can choose, I'll choose noisy pictures over blurred pictures...

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    I read what you write with interest, Jan-Olav!
    My experience, with the Pentax, is that having shot a hole lot at ISO200 and struggling with 'this and that', I've lately used 400, struggling less.
    Now that I shot all from yesterday at 1600, they were all ok.
    Is it so that ISO for old type films and digital cameras are two different things??
    I never use 'auto' for anything or at any level no more. I only use 'manual' be it ISO, white balance, way of taking the picture and what not.

    Cecilia:
    Heartfelt thankyou for taking time to comment my images so that I can be a better photographer in the future. Appreciated beyond!!!!
    This way, as I also have meanings of myself, I'm fortunate enough to pick the best of what you say to melt with my own opinion. That mix should give good results, I hope.
    Add a couple of others with their info, Pakarang and Tommi, and we almost have ourselves a photography course here

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  • pakarang
    replied
    Re: Walking Bjerkestrand (Kristiansund/Frei)

    When I a seldom time shoot with the ISO at automatic, the camera seems to like ISO1600 and ISO3200.... the images turn out to be allright at that ISO speed, but if I manually select 1600 or 3200, they get very grainy.... that I don't really understand. hmmmm.... Should be the same result, right?

    You seem to have been very successful at your images, even at this high ISO.

    I normally never shoot higher than ISO200 now. There is something still sticking in my mind from the age of the old films: 400 was back then very high film, and 1200 was a film rarely bought.

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  • Seagull
    replied
    What a start to your walk Sterkoder! You must have felt so pleased you’d decided to go out the moment you saw that leaf. Amazing colour. But yes, that “whatever it’s called” in the second photo is lovely too and I found the sort of diagonally crossing lines in the composition very satisfying.

    I couldn’t make my mind up about #118/4 of the “three seasons”…maybe I’d have focussed on the tree…but to be honest if I’d been there I’d most likely have not been able to decide. So in trying to do several with different things in focus I’d probably have missed the boat so to speak!!!

    The next image of the leaf and the bark of the tree is it as far as I’m concerned…your absolute image of autumn. …(and how appropriate that as a favourite it should be located near the stone seagull )

    The shore in #119/1 takes me back to being there –and always a special subject for you. I can hear those small waves, and the light reflected in that pool bottom left completes the picture.

    See, I knew that sailboat’s moment would come if I decided not to focus on it earlier. The panorama with Aspøya is simple and rather emotional.

    The tussocks reminded me of Dougal, the shaggy dog in the 1970’s TV animation series “The Magic Roundabout”. Goodness, I haven’t thought about that for ages!!!!!!

    In #120 I liked the first one because the chair has the same sort of general shape as the branches strewn on the grassy shore. Oh and I do like that tyre….it has formed it’s very own “rock pool”…or should I say “rubber pool”! Yes, tilted version of the beer can! (I won’t comment on the variety .
    Hello there…I thought there would be a guest appearance somewhere…sturdy looking look-out-pole I’ve got there!

    Haha…pakarang was quick in there with the beer can comment!

    The twisted branch in post #122 is almost slightly scary, like a creature or perhaps a giant stick insect, an excellent image in every respect.
    And I am absolutely intrigued by that concrete…it is indeed art.

    The little dinghy is charmingly captured in your photo. Actually it reminds me of my childhood too, but that was a large and similarly shaped basket my grandmother used for collecting and carrying washing from the clothes line …I used to spend hours curled up in it pretending it was a boat, tucked up under a blanket and waterproof, and having with me my most precious belongings.

    Photographically that thorny wild rose branch, #123/1, is an absolute winner. For the first time, I start to put it with other images as if at an exhibition, something I so often do with pakarangs. It goes alongside #118/5 of the leaf and the bark.

    Thank you for the walk… oh I can hear the squelch as I step though the rain-soaked moss of that last image!

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