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    #91
    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
    Maybe Elizabeth's fundamentalist friends????
    LMAO on that one!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I'm still gonna call it the Airport in Hell...........

    Comment


      #92
      Originally posted by ehp View Post
      I'm still gonna call it the Airport in Hell...........
      You could get me in trouble with AVINOR... the operators of the airport... they are trying hard to market themselves as a public-friendly airport.
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

      Comment


        #93
        Well, then, I will Call it by it's proper name...

        After all, there could be no place called "Hell" when you are so close by, right????

        (The Wench is just trying to stay in the Captain's good graces...)

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          #94
          For your information: There are also other places called HELL.

          One of them is almost in Paradice.

          Grand Cayman, near Coconut Bay, at the end of Seven Mile Beach there is a place called Hell.



          Unfortunately I have no pictures form that place, but here you can see some from other photographers

          Pictures form HELL
          Øistein

          If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving is not for you...

          Comment


            #95
            Hell at Grand Cayman have a nice gift shop, anyway

            "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

            Comment


              #96
              Just now, this afternoon:

              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

              Comment


                #97
                Trondheim Airport has now gotten their own updated webpage:

                http://www.trondheimlufthavn.net/index.php

                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                Comment


                  #98
                  Originally posted by pakarang View Post
                  Just now, this afternoon:

                  I noticed the text on the picture itself giving facts of this flight, which I assume has been copied from some tracking site?

                  What I don't understand is that the Callsign is given as UAE201 and the Registration as A6-ECR.

                  As far as I have understood this, UAE is the ICAO Identification for Emirates and 201 is the IATA flight number (EK 201), which together is what I believe Air Traffic Controls and other planes use when they call by voice, and probably what will show on their screen when tracking this flight by radar or other means?

                  Both ships and planes have a designated callsign. The prefix A6 is designated for callsigns given to ships and planes registered in United Arab Emirates, like LA-LL is designated for Norwegian ships and LN for aircrafts registered in Norway. (For Singapore the prefix is 9V, for Holland PH and so on)

                  In this case the Callsign is referred to as the Registration. Does that mean that the callsign for an aircraft is also it's registration?
                  No equivalent to a IMO no., which follows a ship regardless of change of ownership, or flag?? (Callsign will change with change of flag, even if the Ownership is the same, however)

                  I have noticed that planes frequently display a callsign from another country then the home country of the airline it is used by. I have always assumed that being because it is on lease and the actual ownership is elsewhere??

                  Comment


                    #99
                    I imagine this one calls in as -"Emirates two-zero-one" , as 'Emirates' are that airlines callsign. It could also be -"Tripple seven echo-charlie-romeo heavy" , but that's too long on a busy radio.
                    You know, SAS' callsign is 'Scandinavian' followed by flight number, Mesa Airlines' callsign is 'Air Shuttle' followed by flight number and so on.
                    The flights in the SAS system which fly in the old Braathens route system, use callsign 'Scanor'.
                    Commercial airlines seldom use the aircraft registration as callsign, and they never do in Norway anyway...
                    Last edited by Sterkoder; February 1st, 2010, 20:35.
                    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
                      I imagine this one calls in as -"Emirates two-zero-one" , as 'Emirates' are that airlines callsign. It could also be -"Triple seven echo-charlie-romeo heavy" , but that's too long on a busy radio.
                      You know, SAS' callsign is 'Scandinavian' followed by flight number, Mesa Airlines' callsign is 'Air Shuttle' followed by flight number and so on.
                      The flights in the SAS system which fly in the old Braathens route system, use callsign 'Scanor'.
                      Commercial airlines seldom use the aircraft registration as callsign, and they never do in Norway anyway...
                      OK, there is obviously a different understanding of what is Callsign in the air and on the sea.

                      Callsigns, in my understanding, is given to any vessel, aircraft or shore based radio stations by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) based on their country of registration, but has lost some importance since Telegraphy got replaced by Radio Telephony and Satellite Communication and the Morse Code is no longer in use for communication. (It is still used to identify radio beacons etc. though)

                      It appears that some (most?) countries has adapted this as their aircraft registration designation, while others have not. (Callsigns for USA starts with AAA-ALZ while their aircraft registration is N-followed by a row of numbers)

                      The use of varying forms of designating an aircraft in flight surprise me a bit. Using the term "Emirates 201" identifies the flight but not the aircraft type or identity. Using the term "Triple seven echo-charlie-romeo heavy" identifies the aircraft type but nothing else. (There could be several B-777 ER in the air at the same time) Couldn't this cause confusion?

                      By the way what does the "Charlie" stand for in the above???

                      Comment


                        Take for instance a quite normal flight here in Norway, a flight between Oslo and Kristiansund called SK2301.
                        The radiocall (callsign) would be -"Scandinavian two-three-zero-one". The guys in the air traffic control don't care much if that flight are being flown by a Fokker F-50, a Boeing 737, an MD-80, a Boeing 777 or whatever, just as much as the ATC don't care if the flight UAE201 were flown with a Boeing 777, Airbus A380 and so on.
                        The ATCs only interest is the flightnumber and separates aircraft based on that.
                        "My" litte Piper is registered LN-NPO, and I use -"Lima-November-November-Papa-Oscar" in my initial radiocall, and that is later shortened to -"Lima-Papa-Oscar".
                        If there are another small aircraft registered for instance LN-PPO, it too will use -"Lima-Papa-Oscar" on the radio, but then we separate with the ATC by using the aircraft type before the callsign; -"Piper Lima-Papa-Oscar" or -"Cessna Lima-Papa-Oscar" .

                        The "Charlie" stands for Charlie...., as the letter C in the ICAO alphabet.

                        Military callsigns are also special, as they in norway use "Savior" for our Sea Kings with the 330 sqn., "Husky" for our Hercules' with 335 sqn., "Saint" for our Orions with 333 sqn., "Lion" for our F-16 with 334 sqn. and so on.
                        Last edited by Sterkoder; February 2nd, 2010, 10:11.
                        "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
                          The "Charlie" stands for Charlie...., as the letter C in the ICAO alphabet.
                          I do know the phonetical alpabet, after all I have used it for more then 40 years.
                          But I didn't notice that the aircraft type (B-777 ER) and the Callsign/Registration (A6-ECR) was so similar. I got it confused with an aircraft type (B-777 ECR), which I had never heard of.

                          The Vessel Trafic Control here in Singapore, who handle hundreds of ship movements every day, insist on using the Callsign to identify vessels.
                          The Callsigns are therefor spelled phonetically and checked against reported arrivals, depatures and reported passage through the congested waters of the Singapore Strait to make sure that each vessel are identified correctly.

                          With vessels of all nationalities and varying level of English being available, not to mention similarities in names at times, it is important to avoid confusion and dangerous situations.

                          Comment


                            I do know the phonetical alpabet, after all I have used it for more then 40 years.
                            That was my understanding too..., so therefore I was a bit...., confused, about you asking what it ment.
                            "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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                              Had to go to Stjørdal today for some personal business, and on the way home, I dropped by the airport for a short moment to get some winter shots. The weather wasn't too great, shifting all the time between sunny and blizzard like conditions.

                              The images didn't turn out too great, they are a bit grainy, but I guess that is what you get when you take pictures when it snows.



                              Clearing the runways and taxiways:

                              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                              Comment


                                Wideroe arriving:



                                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                                Comment

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