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Kristiansund Airport - Kvernberget

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    A new load of Italian soldiers arrive at Kvernberget in a Boeing 737 from Air Italy.
    I don't know how many flights Air Italy made so far, I've seen two myself, but for the NATO exercise 'Trident Juncture' there will be 2.000 Italian soldiers arriving via Kvernberget.
    They will be in a camp at Vidflotten/Lesja shooting range, and tons upon tons of equipment and different vehicles has arrived by ship to Åndalsnes and driven up to the camp.
    The Trident Juncture exercise will be the largest NATO exercise in Norway for many decades and will see over 40.000 soldiers from 40 different countries. The core dates are between 25th October and 7th November, when armies, air forces and navies from different countries will "play their war game".

    ​​​​​​SSL27095 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    ​​​​​​SSL27099 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    ​​​​​​SSL27097 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

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  • pakarang
    replied
    That is a really great result - hadn't you said it was a Tilt-Shift, I would probably have thought it was a perfectly made DIARAMA (is that the correct word?).

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Playing with tilt-shift again in a picture I took a couple of years back. The long blue building to the left there is the hangar of the local aero club, Møre Flyklubb, where I've been a member since 1983 and still is
    ​​​​​​SSL25295-tiltshift by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

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  • Ralf__
    commented on 's reply
    Exactly. Now i know not only, how it works, even how to use it properly! If i ever come by airplane, i will remember!! Supercool.

  • Sterkoder
    commented on 's reply
    My pleasure, Ralf :-) (The glide slope for runway 25 at Kvernberget is 3 degrees, by the way ;-) )

  • Ralf__
    commented on 's reply
    Interesting explanation of the PAPI system. I didn't know that before. The same idea as in many lighthouses. Cool.

  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Yesterday I combined the need for a long walk and the urge to take some photos. I parked my car and walked to the east end of the runway at the airport.

    SSL27057 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    SSL27060 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    Detail of a center line strobe lead-light. The eight red blurred lights in the background is the PAPI-system.
    PAPI is short for Precision Approach Path Indicator and gives a pilot a visual reference as to what approach angle the plane has towards the landing.
    "All red, you're dead" meaning the aircraft is way too low. "All white, you'll fly all night" meaning if all are white, the aircraft is way too high.
    The perfect light signal would be two red and two white on each side. That gives an angle of about 2 to 3 degrees of glide slope.
    SSL27062 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    SSL27085 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    One of Widerøes Dash 8-103, LN-WIF, take off as flight WF555 towards Trondheim and Værnes airport. This plane was delivered to Widerøe 21st January 1994.
    SSL27067 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    SSL27069 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

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  • pakarang
    replied
    Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
    What they plan to build next to the airport is the new passenger facility combined for planes and helicopters. The building for arrivals and departures of today is far inside the safety zone sideways from the runway centerline. But first, Avinor want to use the abandoned building vis-a-vis the passenger facility of today, the former firestation and technical building, to build it together as a temporary solution to meet the demands from the overcrowded facilities of today.
    There has been one (1) rebuilding of the passenger facilities since the original building was built for the airport opening in June of 1970.
    With the increase in air-travel, and to stay competitive, this is something that HAS to be done sooner or later. Sooner is better.

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    What they plan to build next to the airport is the new passenger facility combined for planes and helicopters. The building for arrivals and departures of today is far inside the safety zone sideways from the runway centerline. But first, Avinor want to use the abandoned building vis-a-vis the passenger facility of today, the former firestation and technical building, to build it together as a temporary solution to meet the demands from the overcrowded facilities of today.
    There has been one (1) rebuilding of the passenger facilities since the original building was built for the airport opening in June of 1970.

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    Nice vistas of the airport in your city: do you have an idea what they are building next to the airport?

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Coming out of the forest after a 30 minutes walk to a ridge I've never been on before. A new perspective and something I didn't belive was possible after so many years of photographing the city.

    SSL26808 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    Kvernberget ATC
    SSL26817 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    View east, with the hangar and club house of Møre Flyklubb (the local aero club) and Avinors area for practising fire- and rescue
    SSL26821 2 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    Møre Flyklubb house behind our hangar. The hangar currently house one Piper PA-28-181 (LN-NPO) and a Cirrus SR20 (LN-LAW). (The registrations if someone wants to Google)
    Fire- and Rescue exercise area in the background
    SSL26823 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr




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  • nari
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you so much, it sounds a rather good system of management all round.

  • Sterkoder
    replied
    The orange squares are fabric markers with the text REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT on them.
    They are attached to small plastic seals that cover pitot tubes, the part of the air speed indicator system that provide dynamic air pressure into the system.
    The other device is the static ports (small holes in the fuselage) that provide static pressure to the system.
    The difference between the static and dynamic pressure is calculated and is given to the pilots as airspeed on the dash board.
    It's vital that the dynamic and static ports are kept open and that no dust or insects or nothing can interrupt the airflow and therefore, when on ground, they put covers on the tubes.
    To help the crew not forget to take them off before flight, they hang long orange or red fabric squares on them. That was the simple explanation.

    The other places you can spot such squares with the same text on them, are on the undercarriage struts, where they put lock pins in holes to prevent accidential retraction of the landing gear on ground when parked.

    On military aircraft we often see such squares on weapons as well, when they are attached to safety pins when the aircraft is on ground and everyone want to secure the weapon/bomb from accidential separation from the aircraft, and what that might come to.

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  • nari
    commented on 's reply
    Svein, what are the little orange squares on a string on the nose of the plane under the ****pit shields?

  • Sterkoder
    replied
    For the second day in a row we have a Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. G-VI (G650) visiting here in Kristiansund.
    Reg. is N47TR and the plane, owned by Bank of Utah Trustee in Salt Lake City, was built in 2014 and is powered by two Rolls-Royce BR700.
    The plane left Bodø two days ago, but we don't know who charter the plane. We, who has experienced such business jets here at this time of year before, think about a certain Russian oligark, but who knows :-)

    ​​​​​​SSL26776 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    ​​​​​​SSL26777 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    ​​​​​​SSL26782 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    ​​​​​​SSL26786 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    ​​​​​​SSL26787 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

    ​​​​​​SSL26789 by Svein Ludvigsen, on Flickr

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