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Kristiansund Airport - Kvernberget

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    It's a nice design, allright...., but lately (over the last years) there has been some snags which has forced SAS to cancel flights, which again has led to Kristiansund being without airborne connection with the rest of the country for large periodes of the day.

    It's a quite noisy plane inside, especially during take-off and climb. Once at cruise it's ok.

    In the older days this design was the Fokker F-27, without the small winglets and with two Rolls-Royce Dart engines.
    Then there was four-bladed props and the loud howl from the engines in taxi could kill a guy!!

    At Kvernberget the F-27 was used by Braathens SAFE, Air Executrive, and the F-50 version by Busy Bee, Norwegian Air Shuttle and SAS.

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  • pilotdane
    replied
    Thank you for the photo. That is one plane I have never ridden and I do not think I have ever seen one. Looking online there were very few operators in North America.

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Tonight, Sunday 31st October at 20:45 local time, an era is over at Kvernberget.

    At 20:45 the last of SAS's Fokker 50 operation at this airport, and in Norway at all, took off as flight SK2327 to Bergen.

    Here's a picture I took in May 2005. -"Thank you, Fokker 50...., I will miss your design and sound!"

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Long time since I've visited Kristiansund airport now. Guess I'm loosing interest to aircraft. I don't know....
    Anyway. Drove up there during my lunchbreak today because someone described a plane I never did see before, but there were nothing more interesting than a tri-jet Dassault Falcon 900 and a tiny little Cessna 500 Citation Mustang.
    A helicopter (Sikorsky S-92) did arrive and at stand #3 was a Dash-8 from Widerøe.


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  • pakarang
    replied
    I will keep it in my mind... just in case I should be brave enough some day - and too bored of standing freezing on the cold spotter place.

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    I wonder if I could get a "behind-the-scenes tour" some day, that would have been so awesome.
    If you are not easily embarrassed by anything ( 'ikke beskjeden' as we say in norwegian ), you could always knock on the door to Avinor and their 'Lufthavnvakt' to explain your business.
    You can explain to them that you are a plainspotter (as I belive they know what that is at Værnes) and ask them if you can ride along in the car when they take one of their many inspection drives along the tarmac, taxiways and runway.
    (I know knocking on Avinor/Lufthavnvaktas door works on some airports, among them Kvernberget. One important thing when doing so: be serious, explain your passion for taking pictures of airplanes in a way they understand ).

    If that don't work, maybe you can contact Trondheim Flyklubb/Værnes Flyklubb to try to get on the airside of the fence (as their guest)....., but of course, it would've been a lot easier if you knew someone there.

    One last idea, and a longer way to go, is to get to know one of the other planespotters on those rocks. As you get to know them better and talking gets easier, you might want to ask who the one was who got a tour on the airside of the fence once...., as I remember one of them has.
    Maybe you can get in contact with him (who clearly knows somebody on the inside), or you can get contact info from him to maybe get a tour of yourself.

    I got no more ideas, as I don't know anyone inside the fence at Værnes anymore, but good luck no matter how long it takes to get your wish fulfilled
    Last edited by Sterkoder; February 23rd, 2010, 22:25.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    I wonder if I could get a "behind-the-scenes tour" some day, that would have been so awesome.

    I think the Boeing 737 image above is not possible anymore as the trees in between has grown some since it was taken (well, that is what I remember, but I could be wrong).

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Originally posted by pakarang View Post
    Actually, one of the biggest driving forces for me to go there, is knowing how much you enjoy images from that location.
    I'm honored!
    That's because I spent a year there when I was 19, so Værnes and Stjørdal has left good memories in my mind
    Hangar 5 was my place and I was a bit sad when the RNoAF Pilot School was moved to Bardufoss.
    From that spot at Værnes, I guess you can also see three control towers from different time periodes.
    In the picture of the 737 above here, two are placed just outside the right edge of the picture, and the oldest looking just like a steel mast. On top of that, there was a platform for a signal-man with two signal flags

    Værnes control towers history with images: http://www.avinor.no/lufthavn/trondh...vnens+historie
    Last edited by Sterkoder; February 23rd, 2010, 21:47.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
    I do so look forward to more images from Værnes.
    Actually, one of the biggest driving forces for me to go there, is knowing how much you enjoy images from that location.

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Mental note: must return to that place to get some winter images!
    I do so look forward to more images from Værnes.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    Beautiful image from a different angle than the way I was looking....

    Mental note: must return to that place to get some winter images!

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
    It's a cool picture. I never really noticed that landing gear doors do not close once the gear are extended. Now I'm wodering if there is a door to cover the wheels when retracted.
    All Boeing 737 models, from the oldest old to the newest new, have just a small "door" to cover the leg of the undercarriage.
    When retracted, the rubber wheel and a rimcover is perfectly lined with the hull/belly.

    On the image below, you can see the small "door".
    (Image stolen from member 'Newshunter' on Scanair forum, and the 737 is about to taxi out for take-off at Trondheim Airport. Sorry for the steeling of image!)
    Last edited by Sterkoder; February 22nd, 2010, 08:46.

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  • pilotdane
    replied
    It's a cool picture. I never really noticed that landing gear doors do not close once the gear are extended. Now I'm wodering if there is a door to cover the wheels when retracted.

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  • Sterkoder
    replied
    Originally posted by pakarang View Post
    Every time I see a Scandinavian 737 I find myself missing the Braathens Safe livery...
    Me too. But I miss the F-28 in BU livery the most
    SAS will end their F-50 operations during the spring of this year, and Widerøe's will take over with Dash-8-300 and Q400 in Kristiansund, Molde, Bergen and Stavanger (Vestlink).
    And I wonder how many more years we will see the SAS livery on the 737s, as SAS keeps delivering red numbers.
    I heared one time that Lufthansa might buy the company, but I don't know how serious that might be...

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  • pakarang
    replied
    Every time I see a Scandinavian 737 I find myself missing the Braathens Safe livery...

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