Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

ex-USS PCE833, ex-HMS Kilham, ex-Sognefjord, ex-Orion, ex-Orion II, ex-Corona, Orient Explorer /+ sisters

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #46
    Oh, my oh mine... Am I the only one falling in love with this cute vessel?

    She looks absolutely stunning in almost all her different stages of life, and she has a certain charm to her design which has long been lost from shipbuilding.
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


      #47
      someone please tell me that Jan-Olav did NOT just call a ship "cute".............

      Comment


        #48
        I love the design of "MS Stavanger"
        I am surprised that the keel is formed like a speed boat.
        Is that still today an advantage?
        Last edited by Ralf__; May 8th, 2009, 08:29.
        Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

        Comment


          #49
          more pics...

          removed personal photos
          Last edited by orionboy; July 30th, 2010, 23:37.

          Comment


            #50
            Thank you for sharing these pictures with us! This is one of the most interesting threads of the forum!
            Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

            Comment


              #51
              And THANKS for sharing the family photos--makes the thread even MORE wonderful!! SO, Orionboy--would that be YOU in red ???

              Comment


                #52
                orion

                Yes im the one in red...very wild then! And my sister is dancing with my grandpa
                ,other ones are my cousins.Almost the whole renovation was made with family forces...thats why the ship is specially important to me.

                Comment


                  #53
                  m/s sunnfjord in 1968


                  This pic i like very much,makes me laugh always.I think they were trying skijumping with sunnfjord,but they do it wrong way...surprisingly there was no damage for the ship or passengers.So you really can call this pce/am class vessels multitalented,you can do almost anything with these ships and they are unbreakable=)

                  Comment


                    #54
                    Sunnfjord on the Rock

                    Looks like a navigational error has occured.

                    Comment


                      #55
                      PCE 830 - Sunnhordland

                      I found a pic and drawing of the Sunnhordland in her original configuration.


                      Comment


                        #56
                        Kristina brahe 1976

                        removed personal photos
                        Last edited by orionboy; July 30th, 2010, 23:38.

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Fantastically amazing.... thanks so much for adding so much to her story. !
                          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                          Comment


                            #58
                            HMS Kilham - bless her cotton socks!

                            Hi, one and all from a damp UK.

                            A brief intro - I am the (slightly) elder brother of Barry (see posts 18/21/33 on this thread). Barry drew my attention to this site and this thread in particular. I would like to sincerely thank everyone for their contributions and for posting some wonderful photos of the Kilham to enable her history and progress to be monitored. As Barry has recounted, our interest was fuelled by our father's flowery tales of his WWII experiences, and I would wish to elaborate a little on some of Barry's recollections to both bring the Kilham's past a little bit more to life and to register part of our father's life for posterity! (Also it is a way of ensuring this thread retains its impact and rating, which I hope it continues to do.)

                            Even though, as Barry wrote, our father spent only a part of the war in the RN and on board HMS Kilham (in the early war years he was a plumber's apprentice, kept busy reconnecting gas supplies following air raids, and also using a bicycle to take messages twixt ARP units etc, IIRC), those years had a deep impact on him. He told us lots of tales and would sing VERY 'flowery' navy songs he had learnt on board the Kilham - just changing some of the words to avoid our mother's rebuke! I'm sure one was entitled "On the Kilham's ship side"!

                            As youngsters, both Barry and myself believed the ship to be the 'Killem' due to how our father pronounced it, and it seemed plausible as our young interpretation was that the ship had been built to fight the enemy and 'Kill 'em"! The problem with that was when we started to research her history we could find no record of a 'HMS Killem'!

                            The tale of the friend who drowned is a sad one. He was swimming just off a harbour jetty, built with rocks, and failed to show up back on board the ship. His body was found the next day where he had dislodged some rocks which pinned him down underwater.

                            Our father learnt to swim during the navy, and he was quite proficient. The crew would dive off the deck of the Kilham. He has recounted tales of shore leave in Freetown (not for repeating on here!) and he acquired a tattoo on his arm which we used to question him about as children. I'm sure that sleeping arrangements were via hammocks.

                            The tale of the day he was made captain as he was the youngest rating on board is one he cherishes. His most popular order that he issued that day was for the distribution of a ration of rum to all ratings! He was very careful about what commands he gave to the demoted captain as he was aware that the roles would be reversed again the following day!

                            One other tale concerns souvenirs he brought home. One which he acquired for himself and which he prizes to this day was a smallish polished wooden rum barrel with a lid which he has always used to keep odds and ends in and which he refers to as his 'tot'. The other didn't last as long! With rationing being in place, many children had never seen a banana in the UK, and adults not for a long time. When he knew they were soon to be UK bound at the close of the war, he obtained a hank of bananas to take back for his own mother. The Kilham did not have a refrigeration unit, however, and it still took some considerable time to get back. On his return he proudly presented his family with a gift of completely black and rotten fruit!

                            Our father was from a large family and his brothers were in both the army and airforce during WWII, but he, himself, was the only member in the RN. His cousin, unfortunately, had also joined the RN but was a member of the crew on board HMS Hood when she was shelled by the Bismarck and was not among the all too few survivors.

                            Our father prided himself in having NEVER suffered from seasickness during his years on the Kilham (an indicator of smoothly gliding through the foam?) despite their ventures into the unforgiving Atlantic. But he was embarrassed in 1979 when he accompanied us on a 'lad's' mini cruise from the UK to Hamburg as the outbound journey started to get more choppy and the return trip across the North Sea was in a Force 10 Gale. About 95% of the passengers were severely ill - it was unrelenting. Even now he blames having to listen to my wretching noises in our small cabin toilet as the reason for his having to hastily run to the toilet himself - and losing his 'record'!

                            Barry showed him some of the photos posted on this thread and he was in disbelief at "Wooden cladding! - We had nothing like that in my day!!!"

                            I would dearly love him to be able to see his dear ship in its current form - I'm sure it would bring a tear or three, but he has never flown and I don't think his current health would allow it, so that is what is so wonderful in his being able to see photos that have been presented. Thank you all once again so much.

                            Finally, I had done some research of my own last year on the Kilham and found a site that had some photos (I think all are elsewhere on this thread). This site logged the progress up to her reincarnation as the Orient Explorer and goes up to 2004 with "Fate currently unknown" - so Barry's chancing upon this site has filled the gaps for us. I am posting here both the textual content of this site and links as there are some specification and armament details of the Kilham that I don't think appear here as yet, so hopefully this will add something to the thread.

                            If there is any more information that can be added by anyone to keep this wonderful thread going and vibrant, please do so.




                            www.navsource.org/archives/12/01idx.htm

                            Patrol Craft Escort
                            and
                            Patrol Craft Escort (Rescue)

                            There were 68 Patrol Craft Escort vessels built and delivered to the US Navy and an additional 17 delivered under the Lend-Lease Program to Allies during World War II PCEs were an inexpensive substitute for larger and more valuable DD's and DE's. Though not much longer than the PC the 180 foot steel hulled PCE's tonnage is more than twice as great. Its speed is 15 knots, diesel propelled and armed with a dual-purpose 3"/50 gun, three 40mm guns, five 20mm guns, two depth charge tracks, and ten K-Guns. PCEs carried a considerable amount of detection and ranging gear for locating submarines. The PCE was designed for general escort work, whereas the PC normally stayed near harbors and worked only with coastal convoys. Some PCEs were converted to PCE(R), Rescue Escorts while others were converted to Amphibious Control Vessels, PCE(C).




                            http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/02833.htm

                            NavSource Online: Patrol Craft Escort
                            Photo Archive

                            HMS Kilham (BEC 7)
                            ex-PCE-833

                            PCE-833 was transferred to Great Britain.
                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            PCE-827 Class Patrol Craft Escort: Laid down 26 February 1943 as PCE-833 by the Pullman Standard Car Co., Chicago, IL; Launched 2 August 1943; Transferred to Great Britian 9 October 1943 and commissioned HMS Kilham (Z 07); Reclassified BEC-7; Returned to U.S. custody in December 1946; Struck from the Navy Register in 1947; Sold in 1949 to S/A Investment (Fylkesbaatane i Sogne og Fjordane, Mgrs.) of Bergen, Norway and converted to a passenger ship; Renamed M/S Sognefjord in 1950; Sold in 1958 to Fylkesbataane i Sogne og Fjordane of Bergen; Operated on the Norwegian west coast until 1982 then sold to Filmeffekt A/S of Oslo, Norway and renamed Orion; Sold in 1984 to K/S Orion Film A/S of Bergen and laid up; Sold in 1987 to Matkat OY of Helsingfors, Finland; Sold again in 1991 to Orion Risteilyt O/Y of Hamina, Finland and renamed Orion II; Sold in 1996 to Jaako Mathias Eriksson of Honduras; Sold again in 1997 to an unknown buyer in Thailand and renamed Orient Explorer. Fate unknown.

                            Specifications: Displacement 640 t; Length 180' 6"; Beam 33'; Draft 9' 8"; Speed 15k; Complement 100; Armament one 3"/50 dual purpose mount, three 40mm mounts, five 20mm mounts, two dct, four dcp, two dcp (hh); Propulsion two 1,800bhp General Motors 12-567A diesel engines, Falk single reduction gear, two shafts.

                            (Includes 7 photographs, similar to those on 'Orion' site - the more recent ones are of good resolution)





                            Also, I saved the following info but can't remember the link. The specifications vary from those above slightly, but it is interesting from the fact that it lists the Kilham's armaments.

                            Patrol Craft, Escort (PCE)
                            Displacement: 860 tons (full load) ; Length: 184' ; Beam: 33'1" ;
                            Draft: 9' 5" ; Speed: 15.5 knots ; Complement: 99
                            Armament: 1 3"/50 ; 2 20mm (bridge); 2x2 40mm (midship);
                            * * 1 hedgehog, 4 K-guns; 2 depth charge racks (20 depth charges each)
                            Diesel engines, twin screws, 900 shaft hp
                            PC-827 to PCE-841 in 1943 to Royal Navy as "KIL" class patrol sloops.
                            U.S. No. RN Name Notes
                            PCE-827 HMS Kilbernie (BEC 1)
                            PCE-828 HMS Kilbride (BEC 2)
                            PCE-829 HMS Kilchatten (BEC 3)
                            PCE-830 HMS Kilchrenan (BEC 4) Today is cruise ship M/S Kristina Brahe, Finland
                            PCE-831 HMS Kildary (BEC 5)
                            PCE-832 HMS Kildwick (BEC 6)
                            PCE-833 HMS Kilham (BEC 7)
                            PCE-834 HMS Kilkenzie (BEC 8)
                            PCE-835 HMS Kilhampton (BEC 9)
                            PCE-836 HMS Kilmacolm (BEC 10)
                            PCE-837 HMS Kilmarnok (BEC 11)
                            PCE-838 HMS Kilmartin (BEC 12)
                            PCE-839 HMS Kilmelford (BEC 13)
                            PCE-840 HMS Kilmington (BEC 14)
                            PCE-841 * HMS Kilmore (BEC 15)






                            That's it. Hope some of this is of interest.
                            Last edited by Paul Cobb; May 20th, 2009, 14:18.

                            Comment


                              #59
                              Oh Paul- I may be the first, but most assuredly not the last to wish you the warmest of welcomes here at CV and to thank you most profoundly for the WONDERFUL post!

                              As one of the few around here who have never worked aboard ships, I can't contribute to all the physical aspects of seafaring, but I am learning!! I love history so much, however, and your post absolutely touched me!

                              Your father, like my stepfather, is a member of the 'Greatest Generation" who fought bravely to keep us free. Your post is an honor to him!

                              THANKS SO MUCH FOR SHARING your personal side of the "Kill 'em"!!!!!!

                              Comment


                                #60
                                Originally posted by ehp View Post
                                Oh Paul- I may be the first, but most assuredly not the last to wish you the warmest of welcomes here at CV and to thank you most profoundly for the WONDERFUL post!

                                As one of the few around here who have never worked aboard ships, I can't contribute to all the physical aspects of seafaring, but I am learning!! I love history so much, however, and your post absolutely touched me!

                                Your father, like my stepfather, is a member of the 'Greatest Generation" who fought bravely to keep us free. Your post is an honor to him!

                                THANKS SO MUCH FOR SHARING your personal side of the "Kill 'em"!!!!!!

                                EHP (Elizabeth?):

                                I, too, am not a seafaring person - Isle of Wight and North Sea Ferries my lot! However, the Force 10 on the North Sea was an experience and a half! Was wearing a decidedly green complexion on docking! My father would not consider himself as any kind of saviour or hero, and my brother's and my own existance owes much to the fact that his experience of action was fortunately limited. However, he holds a degree of pride in the fact that he served in the RN and wears his blazer with RN badge. I'm sure either Barry or myself will ask him for some more reminiscences and, if appropriate, we'll add on here.

                                He recognises the sailor posted earlier in this thread, but lost contact with any shipmate friends many years ago. Who knows, if we can loan one or two of his navy photos, we might add them on here one day!

                                It would be great if any other relatives of Kilham crew peeked in on here and contributed!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X