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ex-USS PCE833, ex-HMS Kilham, ex-Sognefjord, ex-Orion, ex-Orion II, ex-Corona, Orient Explorer /+ sisters

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    The Generators appeared to be of a bit newer date, however:


    But the Main Switch Boards appeared to be original:




    This is the second Generator, which is also probably a replacement:


    This is the front end of the Port Engine:


    The Control Panel on this one also appears to be with all original instrumentation:


    Main Compressor appears to be original:


    The Piping, valves and pumps are Colour Code painted, but not necessarily in International Code:


    I believe this is a Fuel Pump:

    If I was doing a Safety Audit that open Junction Box would have been a strong remark, but I was only a Visitor.

    And finally, Lathe Machine in the Work Shop:


    That was all for this time. I hope to see this vessel again when she is ready to go back to work, hopefully in the not too far future.

    Comment


      Orient Explorer at KK Anchorage, 20. April, 2010

      Just a farewell picture taken as we left the Orient Explorer to go back to Sutera Harbour Marina:

      The new Diving Platform at the stern can be seen here.

      And just for good measure, a few pics from the Sutera Harbour Marina as seen as we approached:






      And a couple of interior pics:




      With a Maritime touch to the design:

      Comment


        Lovely photos, great to see she is in such great hands.!
        I have reported about the new photos so they can get known. The site itselves is already known, hopefully also for the crew from the Norwegian years.. Fun to see the old signs in "nynorsk", guess the owners get a few questions about them..? Some trandslations are needed I guess, foreigners must wonder what the signs say..!
        For instance "Bytteskåp" (bucket locker), they actually wrote it that way in "nynorsk" at that time..! In "sognamaol" it will be "butteskaop"..
        The post office: a small room with "Postkontor" on a sign above the door. It is a window on the door, circle formed (rundt). The sign is like the one over the "sjukelugar" or "eletrikar".
        The flag on the bow is the 150 years old company-flag wich is a part of a old tradition, originally it was ure nation- wide. Every town with an official ship registration had its own letter, the capital of Oslo had an A. The X is Bergen, where she first was registred. I notice they have got the correct colours on it too, guess they had some old photos to help. Remember, that flag was painted over for many years, from she was sold by Fylkesbaatane and untill she got her new home with the current owners..
        The original ship bell was placed above the door under the bridge, and used everytime she was ready to leave for the next stop. The windows on the bridge is original, the circles on them shall secure the sight inbad weather.
        One of the spotlights are original, the other is a new one with the design of the original ones. life boats was replaced in Finland, the originall in wood don`t cover the new safety regulations.
        The boat deck was all in wodd originally, all of it. You notice the circle, they could pull it around in order to get cars easier in and out. The funnel is new with the same design as the original one, only the colour are different.
        Good to have the cargo hatch back, as they were before.
        Fun to see the bridge with that huge steering weel and the old equipments in their place. On the web-site: sensiborneo.com they mention the new navigation systems installed- including Scandinavian security standards..!
        Doors are original and restored, same is the kiosk- and the floors..!! They were put down by some English experts using a pattern made by an atchitect..
        Fun to see the norwegian words on the pannels, in "nynorsk"..! Dutch people settled in Norway learn the language quicly, so I don`t think the owners had any problems with them eighter..!
        Obviously nothing random here, the really know what they are doing.!! The choise of colour are lovely, and the way they have kept the good old style when they replace something. It has been a great piece of handicraft..!!

        Originally posted by ombugge View Post
        Thank you. The last time I received a STAR was at Sunday School, which is more years back then I care to think about.

        But it is time to continue the "inspection" of the Orient Explorer while I still have some time on my hand. Starting from the Bridge.

        She was ahead of her time, with direct Bridge Control of the Main Engines:


        But an Engine Telegraph was also required (Still is, even to this day):


        Steering Wheel and a Magnetic Steering Compass. Electric steering has probably been added:

        You will be amazed at the steering arrangement below deck, when we get that far.

        Bearings were taken relative since there are no Compass on the bridge wing:

        This would fit on the Bridge Wing railings on either side.

        Somewhat newer communication system. A late addition:

        (Even the language has change to "Bokmaal")

        Navigation Light Panel was still the original:
        Last edited by Eliham; May 9th, 2010, 13:28.

        Comment


          Originally posted by ombugge View Post
          Upper part of the Bridge is made from wood:

          Appeared to be original from conversion in 1949

          Spot Light on the Monkey Island is Brass, and polished:


          View along Stbd. side towards the Bridge Wing:


          Port Life Boat was ashore for refurbishment:


          But Stbd. Life Boat was in place in it's davits:

          Life Boats are not original.

          The Boat Deck was also very well maintained and varnished:


          Steps up to Boat Deck and doors down to the Accommodations:


          And here is proof positive of where she was converted:


          Which is confirmed by the wear lists on the steps:


          That will have to do for now. Much more to follow, incl. machinery.
          All of the car deck was in wood originally, all the way back. They could drive in both from the side and from the back, and there was a circle-formed "plattform" where they could turn the cars around in order to get them placed easier. It is fixed up and now it looks quite nice, Dutch people have a long tradition with this.
          Last edited by Eliham; January 23rd, 2011, 08:16.

          Comment


            Originally posted by ombugge View Post
            She is still at her "normal" anchorage outside Sutera Harbour Marina and Resort, just a few minutes drive from the Airport in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, East Malaysia.

            A small teaser.

            First view of her from the Marina:


            A little detail that will please the locals in Sogn og Fjordane:

            I know some are visiting this site. Hope they will come in and contribute to this thread. We still have very little from her 32 years as a ferry in Norway.

            Detail from the interior. Even the signs are still in "Sognamaaul":

            More to come once I have the time, but I still have some hefty reports to write. To be completed before this week end.
            Nowing she is so well taken care of is great, it must have been a huge amount of work put down here.! And the way it is done, they must have done a nice piece of preparations to get it this way..!! The owners have obviously a great sence of details and use of colours, they have both the heart and knowledge of how to take care of a jewel like this, and they have probably seen elder photos of the ship and talked to people who know her from her earlier days.
            When she is registrated in The Netherlands, there may be rules for how to restore elder ships..? It is so in Norway actually, here you must apply before doing any changes..
            Last edited by Eliham; January 23rd, 2011, 08:33.

            Comment


              Originally posted by Eliham View Post
              Lovely photos, great to see she is in such great hands.!
              I have reported about the new photos so they can get known. The site itselves is already known, hopefully also for the crew from the Norwegian years.. Fun to see the old signs in "nynorsk", guess the owners get a few questions about them..? Some trandslations are needed I guess, foreigners must wonder what the signs say..!
              For instance "Bytteskåp" (bucket locker), they actually wrote it that way in "nynorsk" at that time..! In "sognamaol" it will be "butteskaop"..
              The post office: a small room with "Postkontor" on a sign above the door. It is a window on the door, circle formed (rundt). The sign is like the one over the "sjukelugar" or "eletrikar".
              The flag on the bow is the 150 years old company-flag wich is a part of a old tradition, originally it was ure nation- wide. Every town with an official ship registration had its own letter, the capital of Oslo had an A. The X is Bergen, where she first was registred. I notice they have got the correct colours on it too, guess they had some old photos to help. Remember, that flag was painted over for many years, from she was sold by Fylkesbaatane and untill she got her new home with the current owners..
              The original ship bell was placed above the door under the bridge, and used everytime she was ready to leave for the next stop. The windows on the bridge is original, the circles on them shall secure the sight inbad weather.
              One of the spotlights are original, the other is a new one with the design of the original ones. life boats was replaced in Finland, the originall in wood don`t cover the new safety regulations.
              The boat deck was all in wodd originally, all of it. You notice the circle, they could pull it around in order to get cars easier in and out. The funnel is new with the same design as the original one, only the colour are different.
              Good to have the cargo hatch back, as they were before.
              Fun to see the bridge with that huge steering weel and the old equipments in their place. On the web-site: sensiborneo.com they mention the new navigation systems installed- including Scandinavian security standards..!
              Doors are original and restored, same is the kiosk- and the floors..!! They were put down by some English experts using a pattern made by an atchitect..
              Fun to see the norwegian words on the pannels, in "nynorsk"..! Dutch people settled in Norway learn the language quicly, so I don`t think the owners had any problems with them eighter..!
              Obviously nothing random here, the really know what they are doing.!! The choise of colour are lovely, and the way they have kept the good old style when they replace something. It has been a great piece of handicraft..!!
              The pictures here show the Norwegian names of different things, the crew on the ship easily gets to learn what different parts of a wessel is called in our language..! Maskinsjef, maskinrom, billettkontor, akterdekk, bytteskåp, etc.. and it is all in nynorsk..!

              Comment


                Thank you for the great pictures.

                The manual lever on the front end of each main engine. I assume that moved the cams to run in reverse? Do they have to stop the engine to reverse?

                Comment


                  Originally posted by ombugge View Post


                  A bit of Technical details. Here is the Steering Gear:

                  From this point on it is all Wire Pull and Rods connecting the two Rudders.
                  (Difficult to get any good and descriptive pictures in this confined space)

                  One of the Rudder Pintles:

                  The Steering Gear and Hydraulic system is still the original. (I'm not sure if the Electric steering control was original (see earlier pics from the bridge) but, from pictures posted by Orionboy, it appears to have been there when the ship was in Finland. Maybe Orionboy could confirm???
                  Edit: There is detailed drawing of the original steering arrangement from the HMS Kilham, which appears to be the same.

                  From my father's story:

                  "Collision

                  On one particular night while about 15-20 miles out to sea off Freetown and heading back to the depot ship, Smokey was on Starboard watch. A junior officer was on call. Smokey reported seeing green lights to starboard heading their way and continually reported them. The officer apparently dithered in making a decision on what course to take. Steer port? starboard? what to do? Suddenly a huge tanker came straight at them out of the darkness. Smokey said it dwarfed their own ship and collided with their stern, putting a 20' hole in the hull, near their after steering mechanism. The order was given to abandon ship, and due to the uncertainty of her fate most of the crew spent 2-3 days on board the Philoctetes, sleeping in hammocks, which Smokey reckons allowed a fantastic night's sleep! When it became apparent she wasn't sinking, the decision was taken to get her repaired.

                  The normal steering had been destroyed, so it meant crew going down through a hatch at the stern and standing in 3' of water adjacent to the gaping hole through which seaspray was blowing, and hand manoevering the rudder by turning the wheel of the after steering. It took them 6 days steering in this fashion travelling up to Dakar Dry Dock for repair, which laid the ship up for about 2 weeks."


                  Would any of the steering photos relate to this 'after steering'?

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by ombugge View Post

                    But an Engine Telegraph was also required (Still is, even to this day):


                    Steering Wheel and a Magnetic Steering Compass. Electric steering has probably been added:

                    You will be amazed at the steering arrangement below deck, when we get that far.

                    [/IMG]


                    From my father's story:

                    "Duties

                    These were many and varied for Smokey, from the menial to the dangerous. Regular work consisted of continual painting and cleaning of toilets and wash basins for the crew. Officers had their own toilets which were dealt with by stewards. The ship's cook prepared meals, but menial jobs like peeling spuds was another of Smokey's tasks. When on lookout duty, the usual procedure was to spend 2 hours at the wheel and then 2 hours on lookout."


                    Is this likely to be the original wheel?


                    It's great to see that there are so many original features surviving. Despite my father saying that things went wrong due to speedy construction, much has stood the test of time.

                    Thank you, once again, Ombugge, for giving us a 'virtual' tour of the ship. Truly fascinating.

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                      Thank you for the great pictures.

                      The manual lever on the front end of each main engine. I assume that moved the cams to run in reverse? Do they have to stop the engine to reverse?
                      The Main Engines can be controlled from the Bridge, which was a bit of a surprise. There is also a gear, so most likely reversing the propeller shafts would be in the gear box. (Ahead - neutral - astern)
                      The manual handle on the engines would thus be for emergency operation and possibly for starting and stopping the engines.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by Paul Cobb View Post
                        Is this likely to be the original wheel?
                        I think it is, yes. There is a diagram of the original Steering arrangement in an early post by Orionboy in this thread.

                        The normal steering had been destroyed, so it meant crew going down through a hatch at the stern and standing in 3' of water adjacent to the gaping hole through which seaspray was blowing, and hand manoevering the rudder by turning the wheel of the after steering. It took them 6 days steering in this fashion travelling up to Dakar Dry Dock for repair, which laid the ship up for about 2 weeks."
                        Would any of the steering photos relate to this 'after steering'?
                        The Steering Gear compartment was damp, dark and dirty so I did not go in. Only took a pics of the pintle through the hatch.
                        Emergency Steering would have been done from that compartment and probably manually operated.

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Eliham View Post
                          It`s not only the flag that will pleace us here, I guess all of it will actually.! Nowing she is so well taken care of, it must have been a huge amount of work put down here.!
                          Thank you Eliham for spreading the word about this ship and this site among the people that used to serve or travel on her in the years she was with Fylkesbaatane.
                          I have done a bit of spreading the word as well and in that process I learnt that the removal of the flag from their present fleet has stirred up a lot of emotions in S&F. The fact that the Orient Explorer still has the original flag on her bow was mentioned on NRK S&F website, with a link to this site as well.

                          Hope we can get some firsthand stories about her years as the Sognefjord on this site, even if it is in Norwegian. I have volunteered the Norwegian CVF members to translate. (If that fails we can always rely on Clipper to do so)

                          Comment


                            I notice that this thread has had over 10,000 views, so it is obviously a great interest in this subject from around the world. (Or is it mostly from Sogn?)

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by ombugge View Post
                              Is this likely to be the original wheel?

                              I think it is, yes. There is a diagram of the original Steering arrangement in an early post by Orionboy in this thread.


                              "The normal steering had been destroyed, so it meant crew going down through a hatch at the stern and standing in 3' of water adjacent to the gaping hole through which seaspray was blowing, and hand manoevering the rudder by turning the wheel of the after steering. It took them 6 days steering in this fashion travelling up to Dakar Dry Dock for repair, which laid the ship up for about 2 weeks."

                              Would any of the steering photos relate to this 'after steering'?


                              The Steering Gear compartment was damp, dark and dirty so I did not go in. Only took a pics of the pintle through the hatch.
                              Emergency Steering would have been done from that compartment and probably manually operated.

                              Thanks, Ombugge.

                              It is enlightening to see the bits that bring my father's stories to life.

                              I'll have to print some more bits off and get them to him - it should start the reminiscences again. I'm sure he said that while he had to take a share in this most unpleasant task of manual steering in cramped and wet conditions, he was able to watch dolphins swimming alongside the ship through the gaping tear in the ship's side.

                              Comment


                                It certainly is good to see so much interest in this thread. Many of the browsings may well be due to the ship's times in ferry service as there will be few, if any, survivers of the WWII era. My father was the youngest crew member on board, so at 85 in 2 days time he may well be the only one left? - but it would be great to hear of any others.

                                Comment

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