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  • RMS Titanic of the White Star Line

    RMS Titanic of the White Star Line.

    What is a respectable forum covering passenger ships without an own thread for the Titanic? As far as I can see, we have no opened this thread yet here on our new location, so it is with no further delays I present the Titanic-thread.

    You may wish to take a look at these threads on our old board as well:

    Titanic and her coming Gigantic sisters

    Titanic & White Star Auction

    95th Anniversary of the Sinking of the Titanic

    Titanic Las Vegas?

    One Of The Last Survivors of the Titanic Dies

    When did the Titanic actually "break up"?

    88 foot Titanic in your backyard

    The incredible works of Ken Marschall

    In loving memory of Lillian Gertrud Asplund (Titanic)
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.


  • #2
    It is Titanic’s close association with her older sister Olympic that brought about the title of this book. Maritime historians will immediately recognize “The Ship Magnificent” as the advertising phrase used for Olympic in White Star Line brochures later in her career. Such catch phrases were created for some of the other great liners as well. Because Titanic’s career was cut short on the morning of April 15, 1912, after striking an iceberg in the North Atlantic on her maiden voyage, she never had the opportunity to carry such a phrase of distinction. Given the fact that these two ships were near-identical twins, Olympic’s catch phrase has been used as the title for this book.

    Two volumes, just waiting for Christmas again:

    http://titanic-theshipmagnificent.com/
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


    • #3
      I purchased a book call Titanic Triumph And Tragedy, a very expensive 352 page book. Listing all passengers names and where they were from, lots of photo's from the time and a few new ones from the wreck on the Atlantic floor. The more you read into the book, the more questions than answers it leaves you. The Titanic is very addictive reading.
      Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SaintsFCFan View Post
        I purchased a book call Titanic Triumph And Tragedy, a very expensive 352 page book. Listing all passengers names and where they were from, lots of photo's from the time and a few new ones from the wreck on the Atlantic floor. The more you read into the book, the more questions than answers it leaves you. The Titanic is very addictive reading.
        I think I have this book as well... I bought it in the mid-90's and is one of the best compilations on her history and story.
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
        Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
        Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow! Nice one Pakarang. Just guessing but do you have the book "Titanic Voices". Some wonderful photo's of Titanic & Olympic. Eerie feeling to read accounts of survivors. I must admit to having chills up my spine while reading it, then after it gave a feeling of emptiness. So very sad.
          Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

          Comment


          • #6
            These are the links to the covers of the two books I have
            Triumph And Tragedy
            Voices
            Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

            Comment


            • #7
              The cover of my book, Tirumph and Tragdey, is slightly different.

              The other book looks really interesting.
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
              Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
              Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have "Titanic: An Illustrated History" which is pretty cool because it starts off the dinner party when the idea for her first came up.......lots of pretty pictures (duh- look at the title, E)......a good "coffee table" book.......

                Comment


                • #9
                  Last Titanic survivor selling mementos to pay bills

                  http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/europe...ion/index.html
                  Last edited by pakarang; April 17th, 2009, 19:21. Reason: Added title of article.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well, I don't think she'll ever have to think about bills anymore.
                    Millvina Dean died this sunday afternoon 31st May 2009. R.I.P.
                    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just saw it on the news right now as well.... she has passed away:

                      The last survivor of the sinking of the Titanic has died aged 97.

                      Millvina Dean was nine weeks old when the liner sank after hitting an iceberg in the early hours of 15 April 1912, on its maiden voyage from Southampton.

                      The disaster resulted in the deaths of 1,517 people in the north Atlantic, largely due to a lack of lifeboats.
                      http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...re/8070095.stm
                      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                      Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                      Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Last Titanic survivor dies at 97

                        Further to the previous 2 posts, taken from BBC News web site, 31.5.2009:


                        Last Titanic survivor dies at 97


                        The last survivor of the sinking of the Titanic has died aged 97.
                        Millvina Dean was nine weeks old when the liner sank after hitting an iceberg in the early hours of 15 April 1912, on its maiden voyage from Southampton.
                        The disaster resulted in the deaths of 1,517 people in the north Atlantic, largely due to a lack of lifeboats.
                        Miss Dean, who remembered nothing of the fateful journey, died on Sunday at the care home in Hampshire where she lived, two of her friends told the BBC.
                        Her family had been travelling in third class to America, where they hoped to start a new life and open a tobacconist's shop in Kansas.
                        Miss Dean's mother, Georgetta, and two-year-old brother, Bert, also survived, but her father, Bertram, was among those who perished when the vessel sank.

                        The family returned to Southampton, where Miss Dean went on to spend most of her life.
                        Despite having no memories of the disaster, she always said it had shaped her life, because she should have grown up in the US instead of returning to the UK.
                        She was fond of saying: "If it hadn't been for the ship going down, I'd be an American."
                        In 1985 the site of the wreck was discovered and, in her 70s, she found herself unexpectedly in demand on both sides of the Atlantic.
                        "I think sometimes they look on me as if I am the Titanic!" she said after a visit to a Titanic convention in America. "Honestly, some of them are quite weird about it."

                        Unimpressed
                        But she never tired of telling her story.
                        "Oh not at all. I like it, because everyone makes such a fuss of me! And I have travelled to so many places because of it, meeting all the people. Oh I wouldn't get tired of it. I'm not the type."

                        But she was unimpressed when divers started to explore the wreck, located 3,000m below the surface of the Atlantic, saying: "I don't believe in people going to see it. I think it's morbid. I think it's horrible."
                        According to BBC South transport correspondent Paul Clifton, she refused to watch James Cameron's epic film of the disaster, starring Kate Winslet and Leonardo diCaprio, fearing it would be too upsetting.
                        But in the last years of her life, she began struggling with monthly bills of £3,000 at her care home and had been in danger of losing her room.
                        She began selling some of her Titanic-related mementoes to raise funds, and in April a canvas bag from her rescue was sold at auction for £1,500. It was bought by a man from London who immediately returned it to her.
                        Actors Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio, who appeared in the 1998 movie Titanic, also contributed towards her care costs, along with the film's director James Cameron, by donating to the Millvina Fund which was set up by her friends.

                        John White, managing director of exhibition company White Star Memories, and organiser of the Millvina Fund campaign said Miss Dean was always "very supportive".
                        She travelled to exhibitions around the country and took the time to sign autographs and write personal messages for adults and children.
                        "She was a lovely supportive lady and very kind-hearted," Mr White told BBC News website.
                        International Titanic Society President Charles Haas, from Randolph, New Jersey, met Miss Dean on numerous occasions and described her as an "effervescent person with a wonderful sense of humour".
                        "It is truly the end of an era," he said.
                        "She was a truly remarkable woman. She had a marvellous approach to life. It is almost as if God gave her the gift and she really took advantage of it."
                        David Lawrence, from the Nomadic Preservation Society, was a friend of Miss Dean and said he was "very sad" to hear the news.
                        "She was very sharp-minded and very spritely. One of those people who could make a whole room laugh with a story," he said.

                        Youngest passenger
                        Built in Belfast, the White Star Line vessel became infamous for not having enough lifeboats onboard, leading to the deaths of many passengers.
                        Elizabeth Gladys Dean, better known as Millvina, was the Titanic's youngest passenger, born on 2 February 1912.
                        Another baby on board, Barbara Joyce West, was nearly 11 months old when the liner sank. She also survived.
                        Barbara Joyce Dainton, as she became when she married, died in October 2007, leaving Miss Dean the last Titanic survivor.


                        http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/h...re/8070095.stm

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paul Cobb View Post
                          Further to the previous 2 posts, taken from BBC News web site, 31.5.2009:

                          "I don't believe in people going to see it. I think it's morbid. I think it's horrible."
                          I would like to hear what others think of her statement here.... I'm honestly speaking, not of the same opinion. I don't think it's morbid of horrible that people are fascinated by the story of this ship, and that some people actually wants to see it. Is there something wrong with me, but I don't really see the horrible part about it....
                          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                          Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                          Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Rummaging around wrecks

                            Originally posted by pakarang View Post
                            I would like to hear what others think of her statement here.... I'm honestly speaking, not of the same opinion. I don't think it's morbid of horrible that people are fascinated by the story of this ship, and that some people actually wants to see it. Is there something wrong with me, but I don't really see the horrible part about it....

                            Obviously the wreck is the watery grave of many, and contentious because it is relatively in recent history, has always been well reported and there is much documented evidence of the ship meaning that it is often the first name to be uttered if you are asked the question "Name a famous ship". Likewise there are so many wrecks from WWI and II that are war graves and disturbing them would upset people. However, strangely if a new wreck from, say Tudor times (a la Mary Rose) were to be discovered, complete with human remains, it would not receive the same criticism, but would be treated as a find of historical importance and artefacts recovered would be aclaimed.

                            So, is this all down to what is considered a 'reasonable timescale'? ie how many more years are required before it is deemed universally acceptable to visit the wreck of the Titanic?

                            Similarly, if an ancient tomb is excavated, how old does it have to be to be acceptable for any artefacts discovered within to be separated from the owner and put on display in a museum? eg Tutankhamun v Cardinal Newman (19th C).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Don't know, but I can understand her...., loosing her father on that ship.

                              Come to think of it, I don't think I will call it morbid that people are facinated by the ship and her story.
                              As long as they leave the remains of "Titanic" and don't touch the debrisfields, I don't see no harm in taking people down to see her and maybe bow their neck in honour when down there.
                              That might be a sensible link between our forfathers, the history and us and the future.

                              So Jan-Olav, no....., there are nothing wrong with you in this matter. The "Titanic" and the great movie was what reopened my eyes towards ships and the life at sea and made me rediscover my youth field of interest.
                              "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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