Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

SS United States : United States Lines

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    Here is a link of the various videos on the Big U:

    http://www.ssunitedstates.org/?page_id=168

    Comment


    • #62
      Days turn into months, months turn into years, and years turn into decades.

      But still, the United States still languishes alongside a pier almost forgotten.

      I often wonder what is in store for this ship and how long can she stay like this?

      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
      Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
      Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

      Comment


      • #63
        To be honest, this makes me want to weep! On a pratical side I will say this, Governments bang on about what made nations great, about what makes them who they are, about the pride in what they have achieved.... the lies that governments tell is in plain sight in this video. The SS United States was and still is the pinnacle of what is achievable, the technical know how and pride of a nation rests in what is now abandoned at a Philidelphia pier. The future of a nation rests soley in it's ability to never forget it's past, this they have done and this will come back to bite them in more ways than they know.
        It makes me angry & hateful that goverments can do this, I refuse to recognize my own corrupt government beacuse of acts committed just like this.
        Jan-Olav, thank you for putting this to see!
        Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

        Comment


        • #64
          Dear members,

          I have been so honored and permitted to share this fantastic image of the United States with all of you. I have kept it in the large original format, so that we all can study it's fine details. I know, I'm not alone, there are many of us that enjoys images with such a great detail.

          The image belongs to colinpattersonphotography.com


          Copyright by www.colinpattersonphotography.com
          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
          Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
          Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

          Comment


          • #65
            Urgent!

            I just culled this off the maritimematters.com website:
            http://www.maritimematters.com/shipnews.html
            This is not particularly good, nor unexpected, news.

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by releck97 View Post
              This is not particularly good, nor unexpected, news.
              We all knew it was just a matter of time before this would happen. In the current climate i am quite surprised that it's taken this long for the owners to finally come to this decision, i hate to think how much it costs to keep her moored where she is. Despite everything, i feel credit should be given to the owners that they have given others the opportunity to buy the ship, but how long can they be expected to wait for someone to come up with the money? I guess we need to be realistic here, the company that owns her is not a charity - how much longer can they be expected to pay for her mooring fees and maintenance, security etc?

              So this is the deciding moment for the ship, her long wait seems to be coming to an end. Does this news mean she is soon to be scrapped?, or could this shock news be her savior? Will this news finally stir the American people into saving their 'ship of state?'. I guess the next few weeks will tell.

              But lets not forget one thing, the S.S United States is now pretty much a 'clean' ship, and because of this, i see no problem with finding a scrap buyer for her, no legal arguments with this historic ship. She will not be turned away from the breakers of Alang or Bangladesh.

              Having said all of that, I feel very sad that this once proud and great ocean liner may soon be gone. Patiently she's waited 50 years, for 50 years people have paid her dues, and kept her safe. Very sad to think that her long wait may have been in vain.
              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

              Comment


              • #67
                here is a link the might stir up some interests.

                http://www.travelweekly.com/article3_ektid210908.aspx

                Comment


                • #68
                  Saving The SS United States & QE2

                  To Redlinekid2: I have to admit that your having posted the link which covered the SS United States, SS Rotterdam V, Queen Mary and finally the QE2 was one of the finest things you have done, thank you.

                  Now as to the SS United States. I would very much like to see her become something similar to the Queen Mary, but in New York at the Seaport there close to the USS Intrepid. But when I read how much it cost to refurbish the Rotterdam V, $327 million, for a ship fairly well intact. I then thought who is going to come up with $100 million more than that, at a minimum, to totally refurbish the SS United States?

                  As to the QE2. She is a ship that is virtually fully intact. In this case England gets a second bite at the apple. They should never have let her go to Dubai. They now have the opportunity to purchase her from Dubai and bring her back home to say Southhampton. I could not agree more with those people in the link and what they had to say about the QE2. Long live the QE2.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by G. of S. Florida View Post
                    As to the QE2. She is a ship that is virtually fully intact. In this case England gets a second bite at the apple. They should never have let her go to Dubai. They now have the opportunity to purchase her from Dubai and bring her back home to say Southhampton. I could not agree more with those people in the link and what they had to say about the QE2. Long live the QE2.
                    I wholeheartedly agree with you on this. The QE2 should of course never have gone to Dubai. She belongs either here in the UK, or failing that, New York, after all, she was built to cross the North Atlantic. In my eyes Cunard took the easy way out by selling her to Dubai, they knew that Dubai wanted to totally gut her - insuring she would never be fit to go to sea again. £50 Million in the bank, and no headaches for themselves regarding her future.

                    Going back to the link that Redlinekid2 posted, it's interesting to read that Cunard are still keeping very quiet about the terms and conditions of the sale. I have a feeling that this is because there would be a storm of protests from the QE2 fans if the truth was to come out. I strongly believe that the terms of sale would have had some very strong clauses regarding her reuse and resale. And to be honest, it would not surprise me if it turned out that Cunard put in a clause stating that she could only be sold on to breakers.

                    Anyway, this is all speculation, and i have gone slightly off topic, the important news at the moment is what will happen with the S.S United States. Will this final confirmation that she is up for tender to the scrap merchants finally stir the powers to be somewhere to stand up and make their voice heard?
                    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Scrap history? Save our ship!

                      At the very heart of the Canyon of Heroes, on Broadway between Wall and Pine streets, a black granite strip embedded in the sidewalk commemorates a once-famous New York tickertape parade.

                      The marker describes what was then, and remains today, a monumental maritime achievement: the shattering of the Queen Mary's standing transatlantic speed record by America's great national flagship, the SS United States.
                      http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion...3xkx8jhKjBIVBL
                      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                      Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                      Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        I had a feeling that the mention of the breakers might stir some interest.
                        Good to see she is getting some press time.

                        Come on America, you were so proud to steal the Blue Riband from our RMS Queen Mary with your super fast marvel of stylish engineering called the S.S United States, and yet it's the Queen Mary that's having the last laugh!

                        Go and tell Obama that your country is about to loose one of it's greatest national symbols of the 20th Century!
                        Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Hello,

                          Without a serious study of the hull in dry-dock, with thickness measures, corrosion evaluation, any preservation idea is a dream. The hull and structure could be under the rusty paint in good condition, but it could also be in very bad condition. Nothing has been done since decade to have a look. It's just the preliminary point for a conservancy. It need to be financed by government, states or philanthropists. Without a such study, plans are just dreams.

                          After we can talk about preservation. It's of course an important part of US maritime history. But the cost of refurbishment would be MUCH more important than the Rotterdam, even if asbestos has been partially removed (you can't remove all the asbestos without compromising the vessel). But asbestos has been mostly removed.

                          So who will pay for :
                          1) the dry-dock study ?
                          2) the vessel himself if she is in good shape ?
                          3) the refurbishment ?

                          If we were in France, I should say a mixture between public and private interest. But in US, public money is not very well appreciated when it serves private interests. So it could only be private, with maybe a little help of government or states. If a dry dock study is financially realistic with philanthropist action and money, the sale and mostly the refurbishment are out of measure of a single philanthropist. Even for a group, I'm not optimistic. Too much time has been lost for many reasons and I believe it's sadly now to late. I hope to be wrong ...

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            If the ship is in good condition, is the hull shape of the SS United States usefull in the modern world? When I look at any modern cruise ship the hull form is quite different than the great liners so I have to assume that her days cutting through the waves have past.

                            Could she be converted to a hotel ship? I'm trying to think of a situation where that has worked. The closest example, the Queen Mary, has never been financially strong. History and nostalgia are great but they don't pay the bills. The logistics just do not work. Where are deep water berths located? Are they in the tourist or business centers where people want to stay? Can a 50 year ocean liner provide the conveniences that the modern traveler expects?

                            As much as I would love to see SS United States saved I just do not see it happening. I've traveled to the Los Angeles area many times and have never choosen the Queen Mary hotel. It's a bad location and expensive. I visited once but that is the extent of the money I've spent there.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                              If the ship is in good condition, is the hull shape of the SS United States usefull in the modern world? When I look at any modern cruise ship the hull form is quite different than the great liners so I have to assume that her days cutting through the waves have past.

                              Could she be converted to a hotel ship? I'm trying to think of a situation where that has worked. The closest example, the Queen Mary, has never been financially strong. History and nostalgia are great but they don't pay the bills. The logistics just do not work. Where are deep water berths located? Are they in the tourist or business centers where people want to stay? Can a 50 year ocean liner provide the conveniences that the modern traveler expects?

                              As much as I would love to see SS United States saved I just do not see it happening. I've traveled to the Los Angeles area many times and have never choosen the Queen Mary hotel. It's a bad location and expensive. I visited once but that is the extent of the money I've spent there.
                              I think that we should compare the Big U to the SS Rotterdam. The renovation of the Queen Mary was not successful because they followed a buisiness model that failed. That's the unfortunate bottom line with the Queen Mary. The SS Rotterdam is the only other example that is left to compare with. At least the Rotterdam's powertain was not removed to make way for a Museum Under the Sea Exibit that never got off the ground successfully. That is where the problem lies with the Queen Mary because Long Beach ran out of money before the transformation was completed. In contrast, the renovation of the SS Rotterdam is almost finished on the lower decks and engine spaces. As for the ship's hotel services, the early problems will be resolved soon enough with the Gand Dame. The SS United States, I'll admit, will be a very difficult task. The Big U might be successful in New York City rather than Phily. And there is Alang, which might just as well be the only one stop destination.
                              Last edited by redlinekid2; March 6th, 2010, 04:09.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Hello,

                                I agree with you that SS Rotterdam is the best practical example of preservation done until today. But it's only theory, we have to wait the result in term of money.

                                Big U is another case. She has been neglected since the removal of the dehumidification system. Dreaming of a touristic attraction, museum, hotel etc... is not the right tempo. Before any preservation act could be undertaken, you have absolutely to study the safety of the hull. NCL should have some elements, they told a study (August 2004) was done when they bought the two US vessels. Things could change quickly with corrosion and hull integrity, but it's a basis (see the case of the Doulos what happens in less than 5 years).

                                Big U is obviously an important part of maritime transportation and has the level to be preserved as an important point of maritime history (the end of the steam liners area). But is that realistic (in term of structure), is that financially realistic (money). I'm not sure for any of them.

                                Rotterdam was overhauled and transformed JUST after the end of her active life (a few years). The last run of the Big U is 1969 and tugged in 1996 for the last time. 14 years ago ...

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X