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  • Originally posted by Sterkoder View Post
    Question for experts:
    How much, if anything, is left of the original STOCKHOLM (now AZORES) which sank ANDREA DORIA in 1956 ?
    .
    I'm not at all an expert, and only got interested in Azores recently because she is to replace Discovery, which I've sailed on. By coincidence I also became interested in the smaller Funchal of Portuscale Cruises at the same time. Anyway I was trying to find out when Azores acquired that semi-duck-tailed stern which had looked a bit odd in my distant views, largely due to the contrast with the black hull.

    I only got as far as this link, which immediately introduced me to very many more ex-names than I realised - this ship has for sure far exceeded the proverbial cat's nine lives!
    http://www.doverferryphotosforums.co...t-and-present/

    EDIT: Oops Ralf, I had pressed reply before I realised you had already replied to Svein!
    Last edited by Seagull; August 26th, 2014, 17:26. Reason: ...crossed with previous post due to my slow typing!

    Comment


    • "At 20.12.1986 she was named Fridtjof Nansen and used in Oslo as accomodation for asylum seekers. In May 1989 she was sold to Star Lauro SpA and towed to Genoa"

      After completing the job as accommodation for Asylum Seekers in Oslo she was actually laid up in Sandefjord, Norway for a while. I attended to approve her for towage from there to Genoa on behalf of Underwriters in 1989. While in Oslo and during layup she had a skeleton crew of Norwegians on board, but as far as I can remember she was towed unmanned.
      At that time she was in fairly bad condition and I issued a number of recommendations to be complied with before signing a Certificate of Approval for Towage to allow them to depart.

      Here is a picture from her time in Oslo:


      Details of the Andrea Doria collission and her history: http://www.thegreatoceanliners.com/stockholm3.html

      Comment


      • Seagull
        Seagull commented
        Editing a comment
        Marvellous to have additional first-hand information from one of our own forum-family. Thanks Ombugge.

    • Thank you folks! Very informative :-)
      "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

      Comment


      • LOGOS II has reached the end of her career.... captainselim on Instagram shared these images a few days ago:



        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
        Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
        Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

        Comment


        • I don't think we have an own thread for the ANDREA DORIA disaster, but nevertheless, if you haven't seen this close to one hour long documentary about the disaster, I strongly recommend you do so.

          After watching this documentary - what do YOU think? Was there a fog, or not, that night? And who was at fault?

          http://video.pbs.org/video/1312687902/
          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
          Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
          Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

          Comment


          • One of the first Offshore Supply Vessels built in Europe in 1965. The Volans, ex Lady Anita: http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/...php?lid=184412

            Here she is arriving at Victoria Harbour, Labuan FT, East Malaysia:


            And at anchor:


            Comment


            • Guess what....., a long time "dream" of mine to see a classic ocean liner in Kristiansund suddenly came through tonight, when AZORES came to rest at Storkaia late Monday evening.
              I just barely discovered what happened before I was about to shut my pc down and go to bed. The clock showed 23:20 local time.
              The tiredness was blown away, I put on my clothes, grabbed my camera bag and drove the 20 kilometers into the city for a beautyful sight :-)
              It was rather windy, so even though I got my tripod out, there was a slight camera shake present. Hope I have minimized it with the sharpening of images and all.
              You have to take them as they are, so here's AZORES for you in Kristiansund (a crewmember told me their visit was due to very strong winds and heavy seas out in the ocean) :













              The story of AZORES and the notorious collition with ANDREA DORIA as STOCKHOLM back in July 1956 is described on page 8 of this thread, so as the clock now show 02:54 AM local, I'm going to bed...., only to get an alarmbell going at 06:00. Good night folks, may you have a nice Tuesday! :-)
              Last edited by Sterkoder; March 10th, 2015, 08:06.
              "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

              Comment


              • Absolutely wonderful treat to start my morning These are truly lovely pictures, Svein.
                It was also bad weather that delayed Azores arriving in England on a previous cruise, which had the knock-on effect of her cancelling Trondheim's first cruise call of the season. So Jan-Olav missed out, but now it feels almost as if she made it up to us here on CVF by unexpectedly coming your way!

                Comment


                • Svein, what devotion! And what beautiful photos, too. You even made time to chat with a crew member to find the reason for the ship's unexpected arrival.
                  Ivy

                  "To thine own self be true.......
                  Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                  Comment


                  • Sterkoder
                    Sterkoder commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Thanks! Had positioned myself by the gate, and there was no security. The returning to ship crewmembers mistook me for a security officer, and they came rushing towards me with their ID cards. Had to smile, but told them my business and asked about their visit :-)

                  • wherrygirl
                    wherrygirl commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Oh, I like it!

                • Great captures.
                  Quite steep stairs down to the quay?

                  Comment


                  • nari
                    nari commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I had no idea the 'old' Stockholm had been renovated so well. Those stairs would be impossible for most pax, if it were true that the big ships tend to carry "oldies".

                • Don't know if this stair is for passengers or crew only. At the time I was around the ship, only crew members walked up and down. Other than that last night had a maximum high tide. That also had inpact on the stair angle.
                  "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                  Comment


                  • ombugge
                    ombugge commented
                    Editing a comment
                    There is obviously only one gangway, so anybody wanting to disembark and embark this ship would have to use it. (Sorry, no lift)

                • I suppose some might want a few images in daylight too, so here are the result from a rather quick visit at the quay across the harbour during a coffeebreak from work yesterday. Tuesday saw the most powerful rainshowers in months here in Kristiansund, so bare with me on the image weather influenced quality.





                  Yes, I can understand why...., NO!, I don't like ducktails on otherwise beautiful classik ships




                  Parts of this ship has been in foggy situations before, this time played by the rain :-) Bon Voyage! And welcome back.

                  "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                  Comment


                  • nari
                    nari commented
                    Editing a comment
                    What a peculiar stern - is there a particular reason for it? Rather spoils the appearance but I am sure it is there for a reason.

                • 'naripalmer', that stern is called a duck-tail and is mostly mounted on older ships with original classic rounded sterns to lengthen the hull at the waterline. This will make the hull more efficient, reduce needed power over the propellers and so save fuel. I can't tell you more and certainly not the mathematics, but this forum is loaded with mariners, so.... 😉
                  "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                  Comment


                  • ombugge
                    ombugge commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Yes the L/B factor has a major influence on the speed. The Duck-tail" also add stability due to the increased "water plan area".

                    But at the same time it increases drag due to larger under water body. This last is offset by the fact that when a ship is lengthen, but the breadth remains the same, the speed increases with the same engine power applied. The fuel consumption per mile traveled is reduced and thus the time for a trip between two point is also reduced.

                    Fuel consumption per hr. (or per day, which is the normal criteria for a cargo or passenger ship), remains the same, however.
                    It is therefore difficult for some to relate to this as "fuel saving".

                    PS> I'm constantly up against this when dealing with towage. The presumption is; Small tug = low fuel consumption per day = cheaper tow.
                    No, the time it takes from A to B is longer with a small tug than with one that is bigger. (Within reason. Doubling the tug power doesn't double the speed in good weather) Thus the total fuel consumption is about the same for a given towed unit and a given distance in same conditions, while the days on-hire differs with the speed obtained/time taken.
                    The daily charter rate vs. days on-hire is thus the criteria to look for, as well as potentially earlier revenue earning by the towed unit, whatever that is.

                • Thank you for that detailed explanation.
                  My guess was that they are saving something..., otherwise a perfectly normal human being would not "rape" an old classic ship like that ;-)
                  "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                  Comment


                  • Former Cousteau's vessel La Calypso adrift.
                    http://www.midilibre.fr/2015/03/13/a...au,1135425.php

                    Comment


                    • Ralf__
                      Ralf__ commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Oh, how i loved this reports in my childhood! In my dreams and plays i was steering this ship. But her condition seems hopeless.
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