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  • HSC in Bodø week number 19.

    HSC in Bodø week number 19.

    During week number 19, I will be attending a HSC course in Bodø and hopefully, by the end of that week, I'll be licensed and permitted to drive HSC's.

    Received the course material today by mail, so I guess I better dive into the book right away in preparation.
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.


  • #2
    Let's see- it's been an hour--have you finished the book yet, ADHD Boy??? I'm sure you already know everything....

    Comment


    • #3
      Captain,
      I do wish you the very best with this new adventure. If anyone can be a shining star, it will be you.

      Comment


      • #4
        I've said it in a couple of threads already, but it can't be said too often; I'm so happy for you!!!

        And you know, a funny thought came to mind:

        Right now I see your life as a ladder. Yepp...., a ladder.....

        The fist step was moving back home. The second is the courses and licensing, with the new job as step three.
        Then there are several steps I guess are filled with years of interesting work, and at the top step of the ladder, I see a ship in the Hurtigruten fleet...

        Am I far off...?
        Last edited by Sterkoder; April 29th, 2009, 20:31.
        "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

        Comment


        • #5
          Who knows, I guess only time will tell. With a little luck and hopefully some goodwill, things may finally return to a little more normal.

          On the subject of the HSC course, I would like to ask those of you that have a lot of information on one particular subject to step forward and share some knowledge with me.

          As we know, HSC's are ships with minimal underwater hull and buoyancy. Though, I understand the following problem quite well, I would still like to ask for more knowledge and input on the subject of BROACHING.

          Broaching happens when a HSC sails with the swell, and the wave crest travels at a speed equal to or close to the ship's speed, resulting in loss of rudder efficiency (because no water passes effectively past the rudder): throwing the HSC off course (often as much as up to 90 degrees off intended track) and throwing the HSC sideways into the next wave, making capsizing and worse case scenarios a possibility.

          Recovering from a broaching situation is difficult, since rudder is rendered ineffective: so what is the perfect recipe?
          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
          Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
          Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by pakarang View Post
            so what is the perfect recipe?
            Take two eggs and add a pinch of.........

            Sorry, I just couldn't resist....

            Comment


            • #7
              Interesting subject.

              As you might understand, I don't have the answer, but I must say I've never thought that a swell crest could travel at speeds around 30 knots...

              Look forward to any answer, but hopefully the correct one.
              "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

              Comment


              • #8
                Don't know if it applies to multi-hull vessels, but when I was Coxen on MTBs in the Navy, we used to zig-zag to make sure you NEVER got the waves directly at the bow or stern, always at an angle. Hard work for Coxen, since steering was manual.
                Following waves were worst, as it was like surf-riding with the flat bottom boats. If you didn't do it right they could burrow the bow into the next wave, or if you over-did it, they could broach as you describe.

                Otherwise, the logical solution is to adjust your course and/or speed to ensure that you don't get in that situation.
                Better be late Mr. Jones then to be the late Mr. Jones, as the saying goes.

                Comment


                • #9
                  2 days of training with lots of very real simulator feeling has been completed, that is 50% of the training, and within two more days, it'll all turn real.

                  I haven't run into anyone yet, haven't run aground yet and haven't failed - yet!

                  I must say, driving HSC's with either water jet or conventional propellers in speeds up to 30-40 knots is incredibly challenging to begin with.

                  Within a time-frame of just one single second, a HSC will have advanced somewhere around 16 meters at 32 knots. With a one second reaction time, another second to make a decision on action to take, and then actually perform the action: some 3-5 seconds may have passed, equaling close to 100 meters, if not more. To stop the water jet propelled Steigtind (see HSC thread for new video clip uploaded), she needs some 300 meters from full speed also....

                  In waters where you have just a few meters available on each side, with wind and swell, you better navigate with a steady hand and the tongue straight in your mouth.

                  My advice to you all, when you see a HSC coming at you, give them a wide berth because even if you have all the time in the world, they have a lot less. 16 meters per second at sea is so much more faster than on land, where you also are NOT affected by any wind or drift by the currents. A HSC can be an incredibly easy craft to be blown off course due to even the slightest wind.

                  I have a new respect for these fast monsters of the sea!
                  With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                  Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                  Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                  Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                  Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                  Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice to hear that you enjoy....!
                    I belive you'll end up as a good and able HSC-driver and one day a captain of a vessel not known at this moment..., so keep up the good work and consentrate when in the *ockpit...!
                    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Impressing description. I wish you all the best for the few more days and cross my fingers, that everything will be O.K.. I think it is a good way to be very respectful, because a also learned that a boat has a much longer reaction time than f.e. a car. So it is better, always to know what the boat will do BEFORE it does...
                      Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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                      • #12
                        Another day of more simulation and tomorrow last day of training at simulator before I on Friday go "live" to a real HSC....

                        Here are some images I took at the simulator today:



                        Heavy snow, visibility less than 1 nautical miles and moderate swell:

                        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                        Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                        Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Looks so cool--

                          Will we be able to track you on Friday? See the nice straight path you will take?

                          Is it still fun??

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Very cool! I was hoping you would post pictures.

                            Do you know on which vessel you will be training?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have been training on the vessels Steigtind, Ofoten and Salten this past week, but I have now completed the simulation part with an exam and 3 large disaster scenarios on the simulator today. They all went well, and tomorrow, I'll take Skogoy out for my first run...

                              Here are some images from the disaster training at the simulator today:













                              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                              Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                              Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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