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    #16
    With the latest satellite image in the posts about iceberg B17B in the Various News Stories thread dating from 2009 November 5, I thought I should attempt to see what this iceberg looks like at the moment.

    I’m not so familiar with handling the MODIS imagery from the Terra satellite, and without grid overlays or country boundaries conveniently to hand it was not so easy to pick up the iceberg where there was a lot of cloud cover.
    Even distinguishing icebergs from some cloud shapes was not as easy as it sounds!

    Eventually I started to grasp the various channel combinations available so as to “look” in the near infrared, and make the distinctions obvious in false colour.



    You can see my initial “spot the iceberg” problem in the “visual” image on the left, and my solution to the problem on the right!



    So now with this high resolution imagery I can show you the iceberg in this enlargement.


    Reproduction of MODIS imagery credits to:-
    NASA/GSFC, MODIS Rapid Response
    http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov

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      #17
      It is large!!!

      Imagine this white thing suddenly showing up on your beach some day!!
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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        #18
        That is WAAAYY wild, Seagull...THANKS!!

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          #19
          I have been watching the tropical cyclone Edzani in the Southern Indian Ocean over the last few days, here seen on 9 January 2010.
          Whilst not wanting to scare our dear E on her travels next month, I figured that she would appreciate that I was keeping a “weather eye” on that part of the world for her.


          NASA/GSFC, MODIS Rapid Response

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            #20
            It always amazes me how something that can cause so much destruction on the ground, always looks so beautiful from space. But even with all it's beauty you can clearly see the power that it contains.
            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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              #21
              A photo of Britain taken last week by NASA's Terra satellite. A rare sight these days for Britain to be more or less completely covered in a blanket of snow.

              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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                #22
                Great find Steve! What made the UK's snow blanket all that much more worse was the fact that our government doing sod all to help, made it damn dangerous to venture out.
                Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by SaintsFCFan View Post
                  Great find Steve! What made the UK's snow blanket all that much more worse was the fact that our government doing sod all to help, made it damn dangerous to venture out.
                  Ah, now that's because they have been lulled into a false sense of security when it comes to British winters. What with all the hype on global warming, plus about 20 years of mild winters, it's led the government and local councils to cut back big time on equipment and resources needed to deal with cold winters. They didn't even learn their lessons from last years cold snap, but there again, that was probably because all of the weather forecasters and others in 'the know' all said that last years cold snap was a once in 10 year event. Urmmm, WRONG!!! The end result being that our councils have either run out, or run short of salt to treat the roads.

                  A couple of days into this years cold snap i had to drive from here in Devon, up to Newbury in Berkshire, from there to Swindon in Wiltshire, and from there back here to Devon, this was a day where the temperature struggled to get above freezing in the day, and after dark it fell well below freezing. The forecasters were giving out warnings all day. And yet despite all of that, have a guess how many gritting lorries i saw or passed on the roads that day, and take into consideration i covered about 350 miles. Well, I saw absolutely none at all, not a single gritting lorry all day and night!
                  20 years ago you could not drive more than a few miles on such a day without getting your car splattered from a passing gritting lorry!

                  Are the councils these days run by a load of teenagers that are not old enough to remember that we in the UK do have cold winters from time to time? Or is it simply that the councils have sold off so much of their land that they simply do not have the space these days to store a decent supply of salt?

                  Anyway, enough ranting, apologies to all readers!

                  But for the record, I personally am glad to see some proper winter weather back, it kills of a lot of bugs and pests!
                  Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    A photo of Britain taken last week by NASA's Terra satellite. A rare sight these days for Britain to be more or less completely covered in a blanket of snow.
                    What surprices me most is the total coverage of snow over Britain, whilst Ireland is not that far west all green....
                    "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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                      #25
                      Everyone gets the wheather he deserves....
                      Now you know why they call it the green island.
                      Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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                        #26
                        For sure an exciting morning here.
                        D (aka Satsignal Software) has just processed this satellite image which shows the dust from the Icelandic volcano which, as I reported in a thread in the Aviation section, has closed UK air space this morning, 15 April 2010.

                        This is a false-colour image using data from the NOAA-17 satellite. It is derived from the two far-infra-red channels, with a colour palette applied to emphasis the volcanic dust.

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                          #27
                          I thought I’d have a look at a pass of another satellite, NOAA-19, at 13:05 UTC, and this gives coverage which includes more of Norway.

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                            #28
                            Those images make it hard to understand why the UK airspace is closed. It looks like the dust it missing most/all of England.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                              Those images make it hard to understand why the UK airspace is closed. It looks like the dust it missing most/all of England.
                              The volcanic ash is being carried along by upper tropospheric winds.
                              In this diagram from 12:00 today, the yellow arrows indicate the winds, and show a component moving towards Scotland and England.


                              Satreponline.org

                              There is an animation showing the movement and predicted path of the ash plume on the European Space Agency website:
                              http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMKDU9MT7G_index_0.html

                              You can decide if you think the Met Offices advice and the aviation authority’s decision are justified or over-cautious!
                              Last edited by Seagull; April 15th, 2010, 20:00. Reason: added link to animation

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                                #30
                                Just had a look at the animation of the predicted course of the ash. I do not know how accurate they can be with that forecast, but if actual events are anything like what is shown on the animation, then i can see no reason to stop westbound flights from Heathrow, and eastbound flights into Heathrow.

                                BUT, can we really judge the course accurately enough to put peoples lives at risk? Maybe in this case it is better to be safe than sorry. Yes, it's an inconvenience for hundreds of thousands of people, but imagine the outcry if flights were allowed and a large jet came down.

                                Most years this would not be a problem for the UK, we normally have South Westerly winds by this time of year, but this year we are still getting persistent Northerly winds. All we can do is hope that this Volcano starts to calm down very soon, otherwise the world could be plunged into chaos for a long time to come.
                                Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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