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  • [S|S Norway] Questions about our lovely lady

    Like the famous one up for bids on Ebay: SS FRANCE CUTAWAY DRAWING
    sigpicI will never forget the lovely grand SS NORWAY.
    Past Cruises on her: August 22, 1992. June 4, 1994, April 7, 2002.
    Nearly had our fourth cruise, it was set for November 7, 2003...
    the boiler room disaster of May 4, 2003 took her out of service.
    We ended up on the NORWEGIAN WIND, not the same as the SS NORWAY

  • #2
    As far as I know, I have never seen a similar cut away drawing of the SS Norway.

    I do however have this one of the France myself.
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


    • #3
      I just found out there was one, it was in the office where the Purser's worked. A fellow passenger had seen it in '98. I wasn't on the NORWAY on that cruise, but this person said he had to go to the office door by the Windjammer Bar. Anyone on here who worked as a Purser on the ship know of the whereabouts of this cutaway?? And is it possible that NCL has it??
      sigpicI will never forget the lovely grand SS NORWAY.
      Past Cruises on her: August 22, 1992. June 4, 1994, April 7, 2002.
      Nearly had our fourth cruise, it was set for November 7, 2003...
      the boiler room disaster of May 4, 2003 took her out of service.
      We ended up on the NORWEGIAN WIND, not the same as the SS NORWAY

      Comment


      • #4
        SS France, Ice Classification?

        Did the SS France have Ice classification? Also how thick was the steal hull of the SS France/Norway?

        Thanks,
        Murdoch

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Murdoch View Post
          Did the SS France have Ice classification? Also how thick was the steal hull of the SS France/Norway?

          Thanks,
          Murdoch
          Please don't shoot me if I remember incorrectly, but I do remember reading somewhere that the keep of SS France was up to 5 inches thick in some parts, though the average thickness was probably about the half of that.

          I don't recall she having any kind of ice-class.
          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
          Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
          Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

          Comment


          • #6
            Muster Drills On Board the SS Norway

            This is a relatively simple question that anyone who has ever sailed on the Norway should be able to answer. How was the Norway's muster drills handled. Where they before or after she sailed? Were they inside or outside? any other info about these drills onboard would be appreciated.

            Thanks,
            Murdoch

            Comment


            • #7
              To answer your question, they were held before the ship departed. You were to go to your station, for instance my stateroom was O153 (Olympic Deck) and we met in the Club International. Some met at the regular stations with the lifeboats. It all depended on what stateroom you were in.
              sigpicI will never forget the lovely grand SS NORWAY.
              Past Cruises on her: August 22, 1992. June 4, 1994, April 7, 2002.
              Nearly had our fourth cruise, it was set for November 7, 2003...
              the boiler room disaster of May 4, 2003 took her out of service.
              We ended up on the NORWEGIAN WIND, not the same as the SS NORWAY

              Comment


              • #8
                I do have some papers on this... somewhere, but right now, I'm about to join my ship again for work a week, so I must put it on my list of things to do once I get on free turn again.

                But also, as mentioned above, boat stations assembled on the International deck port and starboard sides, in addition to some of the lounges such as Club I, Checkers Cabaret and Saga Theater.

                They were held before the ships departure on the normal run, but were also occasionally during special charters held on the first sea day at 10AM in the morning.
                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                Comment


                • #9
                  This makes me think of another question. I've sailed on five warm water cruises (RCL, NCl & HAL) and we always mustered on deck. I have been on one Alaska cruise (NCL) and we mustered in an interior lounge. Was this just a procedure of Pacific Princess, Princess Cruise Line, or that we were cruising in cold water?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When I sailed on the Queen Mary 2 earlier this month we mustered inside as well. We were in New York and the weather was great. I think that i once herd somewhere that mustering inside is a Cunard/Princess thing.

                    Murdoch

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Muster drills inside / outside are according to emergency plans and where it's most convenient to have a muster station.

                      On the Norway International Deck was an excellent location because all the windows along the deck could be opened, and one could board the lifeboats directly from the muster station.

                      Other ships don't have this advantage. On the Norwegian Majesty, three of the muster stations are located inside, relatively far away from the life boat boarding, while two muster stations are on boat deck.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        SS Norway information

                        As you may know i am working on a model of the SS Norway for the game Virtual Sailor. Part of the process is entering the ships stats into the game so that the movement of the ship can be represented realistically. I was wondering if it would be possible for you to help me with this process by supplying me with any of the following information that you may know.

                        Top speed BEFORE 1990s refit?
                        Top Speed AFTER 1990s refit?
                        Maximum Horsepower?
                        How far could she sail without having to refuel?
                        Area of the ship underwater in Square feet?
                        Area of the Rudder in Square feet?

                        If there is any other stats that you could supply me with it would be most helpful. I would really appreciate any help you could give me in preserving the memory of one of the greatest ships in history.


                        Thanks very much,
                        Miguel Murdoch

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Wikipedia states an "unexpected top speed" of more than 35 knots on sea trials. I have recently talked to a friend of mine, who made two transatlantic crossings aboard her. He told me that on one westbound trip she was brought up to 34 knots for more than 24 hours due to a delayed departure. Her normal cruising speed was around 30 knots.

                          In the literature the power of the ship before the refit is commonly stated with 160.000 horsepowers. By the way, i have a question too: It is not clearly shown, if the refit in 1990 consisted of completely new turbines or if they just modified two of the existing engines. The power after the refit is stated with 40.000 HP, the top speed with 18 knots. But i remember that jan-olaf wrote in an earlier thread that they brought her easily up to 23 knots or so on her carribean cruises. I don't believe that a ship of this size could reach that speed with only 40.000 HP.
                          Last edited by reini; July 25th, 2009, 10:30.
                          warm greetings from the Lippe County

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by reini View Post
                            Wikipedia states an "unexpected top speed" of more than 35 knots on sea trials. I have recently talked to a friend of mine, who made two transatlantic crossings aboard her. He told me that on one westbound trip she was brought up to 34 knots for more than 24 hours due to a delayed departure. Her normal cruising speed was around 30 knots.

                            In the literature the power of the ship before the refit is commonly stated with 160.000 horsepowers. By the way, i have a question too: It is not clearly shown, if the refit in 1990 consisted of completely new turbines or if they just modified two of the existing engines. The power after the refit is stated with 40.000 HP, the top speed with 18 knots. But i remember that jan-olaf wrote in an earlier thread that they brought her easily up to 23 knots or so on her carribean cruises. I don't believe that a ship of this size could reach that speed with only 40.000 HP.
                            The top speed of 36 knots was for the SS France with 8 boilers, 4 turbines and 4 propellers. In the 1979/80 conversion to the SS Norway these numbers were decreased to half.

                            I remember from my time on the Norway we expected a top speed of 25 knots with four boilers lit. However, I personally never experienced that happen. With three boilers lit, we did (average) about 22 knots on the St. Thomas - Bahamas leg. I do not know if the 1990 refit had any considerably effect on the speed.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by reini View Post
                              But i remember that jan-olaf wrote in an earlier thread that they brought her easily up to 23 knots or so on her carribean cruises. I don't believe that a ship of this size could reach that speed with only 40.000 HP.
                              Do I sense someone is doubting the Captains word?

                              Yes, as ostafjells mentioned, she did in fact achieve just below 25 knots with all 4 boilers lit... we relatively "often" did 22 knots on the leg back to Private Island if delayed.... until new company policies forbid it due to the excessive fuel cost involved.

                              In the Gulf of South Florida we even achieved a speed of close to 26,5 knots... the gulf current pushing us hard northwards, and the propellers running at the maximum guaranteed output of 135 revolutions/minute... that was on the way to dry dock in Newport News in 1993.

                              Cruising speed was a much more comfortable 18 knots...

                              I do understand you doubting that the available hp could push her that fast, but remember, she was built for speed and has a completely different underwater hull streamlined and optimized for just that: speed.
                              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                              Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                              Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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