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S|S France and S|S Norway : 1.000 (or more) fun facts.

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  • pakarang
    started a topic S|S France and S|S Norway : 1.000 (or more) fun facts.

    S|S France and S|S Norway : 1.000 (or more) fun facts.

    S|S France and S|S Norway : 1.000 (or more) fun facts.

    This thread was started at our old board and will be revived here. I hope we can continue posting facts in a fact-based manner only in this thread.

    I will also create a thread for comments to these facts: http://www.captainsvoyage-forum.com/...=1357#post1357

    In the attached comments thread, you may also submit your facts for this thread.

  • pakarang
    replied
    34: The call signs of little Norway 1 was C6CM8, while little Norway 2 had C6CM9.

    Leave a comment:


  • pakarang
    replied
    33: The signal or call letters used for identification, especially in radio transmissions, for the France/Norway changed over the years.

    From 1962-1979 they were FNRR
    From 1979-1987 they were LITA
    From 1987 they were NCLE-X
    And from 1987 up until its last days as the Norway C6CM7

    The official number also changed from 3077 as the France in the years 1962 to 1979 to 710763 what it should be now.

    Source: SS France 1962 SS Norway 1979 by Miller and Correia

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  • pakarang
    replied
    32: The original two-level gift shop "Upstairs at The Downstairs' was originally 'Le Club Atlantique', the only bar-lounge that was open to both First-Class and Tourist Class passengers.

    (The cinema, later the Saga Theater was open to First Class in the balcony and Tourist Class on the deck below.)

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  • pakarang
    replied
    31: Another room that was intact from France is the Kid's Corner on International Deck fwd.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    30: The indoor pool on Dolphin deck remained completely intact and unchanged from the French Line days until the conversion of 1990 when it was replaced with the Roman Spa.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    29: When the France was finally laid up in 1974 she had completed 377 crossing and 93 cruises (including 2 world cruises), carried a total of 588,024 passengers on trans-Atlantic crossings, and 113,862 passengers on cruises, and had sailed a total of 1,860,000 nautical miles.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    28: As of December 7, 1974, the ship was moored at a distant quay in Le Havre, known colloquially as the quai de l'oubli - the pier of the forgotten.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    27: In 1972 with the destruction of the Seawise University (former RMS Queen Elizabeth) by fire in Hong Kong, the France became the largest passenger ship in the world.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    26: From July 13 to July 26, 1967, the France docked at the Île Notre-Dame in Montreal, acting as a secondary French pavilion at the 1967 World's Fair, Expo 67.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    25: The SS France was Christened on May 11, 1960 at 4:15PM by Yvonne de Gaulle, wife of Charles de Gaulle President of France.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    24: When the SS France was built one of the reasons she was built so large was that she was designed to replace 2 aging French liners (SS Ile de France and SS Liberté).

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  • pakarang
    replied
    23: When th SS France was mothballed in 1974 the French Government had so much love for the ship a crew of a few dozen men was left aboard the ship full time to make sure she was properly cared for.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    22: At the conclusion of what was to be the Final trans-Atlantic crossing of the SS France crew members held the ship hostage in Le Havre for 28 days.

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  • pakarang
    replied
    21: In November 1968 the Odometer on the SS France surpassed the million miles sailed mark.

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