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  • A Personal Apology to Andrew Shaw

    Hi Andrew,
    In 2006, you took the time to visit the SS Blue Lady at Alang. Around that time, a group of buyers, lead by John Voet and others, wanted to buy the ship. Prior to that, I gave up hope that the SS Norway could be saved. You mentioned that the ship was beyond saving. But some of us chose to ignore it because we could not face the reality that the ship was going to be scrapped. I had always dreamt that the ship would return to France and be rebuilt back to it SS France appearance. However, I now realize that was a financial impossibilty as that type of conversion would be better spent constructing a twin sister.

    Peter Knergo told me that it would have cost close to $1 Billion to rebuild the SS Norway back to the SS France. And the only legitimate party that wanted the ship backed out because of the high conversion cost, and the asbestos/PCB removal, which might have killed the project.

    The SS United States was very lucky to have most of its asbestos and PCBs removed in the Ukraine in the 1990's. Otherwise, that vessel would have been doomed as well.

    I meant no disrepect towards your efforts to save the artifacts onboard the ship. I certainly hope you continue to save some interesting stuff from other ships that are going to Alang in the future. Thank you!

  • #2
    A very wonderful gesture of you.

    Hindsight can be a very powerful tool once it is used the right way. Similarly to you, nobody wanted to see the ship gone, but at the same time, nobody really knew the condition of the ship.

    In hindsight, she would never have turned profit again.

    It is just so incredibly sad that an era ended with her, and that so many others followed her wake. But when we are faced with such tragedies as loosing someone, or something, that we love so dearly: we all have our own ways of reacting.

    There was a lot of things going on at the time, mostly rumors spread by the information-age: all clambering to a faint hope that she would be saved.
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
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    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pakarang View Post
      A very wonderful gesture of you.

      Hindsight can be a very powerful tool once it is used the right way. Similarly to you, nobody wanted to see the ship gone, but at the same time, nobody really knew the condition of the ship.

      In hindsight, she would never have turned profit again.

      It is just so incredibly sad that an era ended with her, and that so many others followed her wake. But when we are faced with such tragedies as loosing someone, or something, that we love so dearly: we all have our own ways of reacting.

      There was a lot of things going on at the time, mostly rumors spread by the information-age: all clambering to a faint hope that she would be saved.
      Hi Jan-Olav,
      Considering what we now know of the SS Rotterdam's renovation cost to remove the asbestos and other PCBs from the ship, I understand why it was financially impossible to perform that type of task for the SS Norway.

      To remove 1250 tons of asbestos and PCBs from the ship would bankrupt her potential owners. I must also assume that the SS United States had that much asbestos within her interior pannel walls that was marinite. To think that the Big U is the prototype for the SS France in many ways. Yet, despite being inactive for over 40 years, the Big U has outlived most of her contemporaries. While the ship is an empty shell on the inside, it also makes her viable business project because its potential renovation cost would not include removing 1250 tons of asbestos.

      I also read that the removal of the Big U's interiors nearly bankrupt her Turkish investors. Nevertheless, the ship is very lucky to still be with us while the SS Norway is not. Fate is never kind to the great oceanliners. We should be fortunate that a handful of interesting classic vessels have survived thus far, with the Queen Mary and the SS Rotterdam. Although, I want to see that list expanded to include the SS United States, QE2, MS Augustus, and the MS Kungsholm.

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      • #4
        Very classy, very noble to write this! My respect!

        And of course I second everything concerning the France/Norway. Everytime I watch my pics of her I try to forget how I felt when the ever-shocking horror pics from Alang came up :-(

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        • #5
          I think you did the right thing Redlinekid. I do hope Andrew Shaw did read this. Because I do think an apology is overdue for him. I've emailed him from time to time and haven't heard a thing, I do think he is thinking things over and probably has regrets. I would still like to buy some SS NORWAY items from him.
          sigpicI will never forget the lovely grand SS NORWAY.
          Past Cruises on her: August 22, 1992. June 4, 1994, April 7, 2002.
          Nearly had our fourth cruise, it was set for November 7, 2003...
          the boiler room disaster of May 4, 2003 took her out of service.
          We ended up on the NORWEGIAN WIND, not the same as the SS NORWAY

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