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  • FRANCE as a new ship in an old book I found

    I found a book in used bookstore. "LIFE- Science library-SHIPS" 1965. I immediately recognized the bow of this lovely ship on the cover. I was amazed with the images and the chapter in the book referred to the France competing in a world between the luxurious world of liners and newer faster airplanes. I hope you can read the text in the images.They are really interesting

    More to follow, Bill
    Bill H.

  • #2
    2nd postof images

    I scanned all of the pages and pasted some together so that you can see it as a book. This book has a foldout showing a cutaway of the ship.(I'm sure most of us have seen this image), it also shows how impressive this ship truely was. I will post it later. The cool thing about the book is that you open a picture of the bridge, and it's 4 pages long.
    Bill H.

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    • #3
      3rd Impressive operation

      I wonder if any of you recognize any of this or was it even on the NORWAY. Safety was a great concern and at the time France had a bridge staff of 93, engineering of 163, pax service of 838, medical of 8 and 10 of radio. a total crew of 1,112 for 2,044 passengers on a ship that could lodge more than the Waldorf-Astoria!!


      BILL
      Bill H.

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      • #4
        The last page of the France chapter

        The story in the book gave a very insightful look at what FRANCE was in 1965, what came before her, and what the view of ocean travel looked like for the future. Then, 1/3 of her passengers were not tourists, but still 80% of transoceanic travel was by air. What that time must have been like? Like us trading our airplanes for spaceships in a 20 year period or less. I disliked a lot of her interiors to be honest. But to see them when they were new, they were sleek, and modern, and beautiful. And the main public rooms remained beautiful. In her lifetime she saw most of the major liners come and go and almost got lost herself. Thankfully we did have her for as long as we did. What an important ship she was. I hope this atricle means as much to you as it did me. and Thanks to "LIFE-Science Library" I am greatful to share it with you.
        BILL

        Bill H.

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        • #5
          Hello there and welcome bigboatbill. Big thank you for preparing and sharing this impressive article – Right now I’m last day before going away for a week or so, but you can be sure this is top of my reading pile the moment I ‘m back.

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          • #6
            A massive thank you goes out to you Sir! What a fantastic and extremely interesting read. Some of the figures quoted are amazing - 93 bridge staff! I wonder how that figure compares to her 'Norway' days?

            Reading through the pages you really get a true sense of how amazing she really was, fitted out with the latest technology possible. And all of that technology merged seamlessly with such style and good looks. She really was built with pride.

            I can only imagine how it must have felt to watch her enter New York for the very first time. And i wonder how the bridge crew would have felt? It must have been such a great feeling. I doubt very much the master of a modern cruise ship could ever feel the same in that situation, take the Norwegian Epic for example, no way could you feel the same when your bringing the worlds ugliest ship into a port for the first time. Such a great shame that style does not seem to count for anything anymore when it comes to building ships.

            Thank you again for taking the trouble to share this with us, i thoroughly enjoyed reading it.
            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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            • #7
              The s/s FRANCE was more as a Ship .

              " LE FRANCE " was the proud of my country ...

              * I have the same book , but in French

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              • #8
                Dear Sir,

                Do you have an image of the books cover...? I would love to add this one to my small collection, as much as I'd love to read more about "our" ship.
                With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Book cover

                  The book cover is the on the first post of this thread. looking down from the top of her prow (I hope that's the term) The part that was cut off, mounted and auctioned off like a deer head. The books title is in the upper left-hand corner. The book is about all kinds of ships of 1965, but focuses on SS FRANCE, and also has a beautiful fold out (it looks like the one on the old forum). It also has more pages about this ship than the others. I have posted almost all of the book, but didn't know what copywright law I might be violating, so I made sure to give LIFE-Science Library all the credit in my posts. I will scan the rest, and I am glad you are interested. I was amazed by the information about the ship as well.......But the thing that touched me most was the last post of the ship enerting New York at sunset, that at only 3 years old they were already worried about her (and all transatlantic liners') future in the airplane age. It reminded me of what we are facing now with the beauty and grandeur of a "true liner" with that of these floating casinos. What is our future?

                  Captain: I would like to send you this book as a thank you gift from all of us on your crew, for your wonderful sites. I have enjoyed many hours on them, and appreciate ALL of your HARD WORK and EXPENSE. Please send me your information, and I will make sure you get it.
                  Bill H.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks... thank you for the clarification.

                    I will try to find myself a copy of this book as well: this is a nice collectors item.
                    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
                    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
                    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

                    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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