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    Thanks Bengt. That's a great one from you. I love the 'punch', the impact, of your panning shots - something to try on my next trip!

    Lofoten seems to have been moored at Alta all afternoon. Does anyone know why? Bad weather?

    Comment


    • Azimut
      Azimut commented
      Editing a comment
      Info from Hurtigruten:" Lofoten" will remain docked in Alta due to bad weather conditions.

    I just had to add some more:



    Ralf's "disco lights".


    A picture about nothing, or pretty much everything about Lofoten.

    Comment


    • nari
      nari commented
      Editing a comment
      wonderful photos, Tommi. The snow on the jet boat adds something special.

    • billplumtree
      billplumtree commented
      Editing a comment
      The snow does a lot for the "nothing and everything" one too, taking the green of the deck away. Tommi's caption is perfect. If I hadn't been on Lofoten, I might have thought the two shades of blue, contrasting with the warm interior, made it an interesting picture. But with it fresh in my memory, it says so much more about being out on deck at that time, in those invigorating conditions, with all that cosy warmth and a red mug of coffee just the other side of the door.

    We had northern lights! On our way back south, in the late evening before we arrived in Tromsø. I'm mildly embarrassed to admit to having mixed feelings about this at the time. How so? How could anyone not want to see the northern lights?! Well, you see, Hurtigruten had given a guarantee that the lights would appear, and if they failed to show up then we were promised another trip for free - so when the captain announced that they had been spotted shortly after dinner, I have to confess there was a bit of a feeling of disappointment mixed up with the excitement as I dashed to get my camera. But I did my best to put that sadness behind me, as we spent a good couple of hours on deck, marvelling at the display that began off to one side of the ship.


    My first attempt at long-exposure photography on a ship moving in waves taught me a few things... Mainly that it's a bad idea, and that you have to shorten the exposure to something closer to 1 second than 15, crank the ISO up and accept that noisy images are better than Spirograph-like star trails drawn by the ship's rolling and pitching.


    I was pleased to get this one (even at 6400 ISO!) since the band of purple colour didn't last very long at all. The lights then took on a fairly static form, stretching right over our heads from bow to stern



    This left me a bit short of interesting foreground - Lofoten to the rescue! :-)





    Comment


    • Sigve
      Sigve commented
      Editing a comment
      I like this.

    • Tommi
      Tommi commented
      Editing a comment
      Moodfull indeed!

    • nari
      nari commented
      Editing a comment
      I like this too. Even better was the green glow that permeated my cabin ALL night, and the next night. Magical.

    Hello,
    I haven't come to CVF for quite some time now and here I am for the new year ... What beautiful pictures and mood we have here in the Lofoten room. It feels cosy, it is full of lights (especially the blue light, which I am very fond of - I miss it ...). Thank you all for sharing.

    Comment


      As if northern lights weren't enough, earlier the same day we'd already had a visit to the bridge in the company of our new esteemed captain (since Tromsø northbound), Eivind Lande. Obviously, the best bit was the original telegraph:



      Technically, it's still in use; in practice, though, only to tell the engine room when to stop the engine when the ship's in port. Other antique equipment not in use as far as I know:



      Is this another speed control, given the astern / forward labelling and the (perhaps optimistic) scale? Maybe a more recent equivalent of the telegraph? I wish I'd asked at the time now.

      The actual control in use today is a disappointing little black lever, so disappointing that I didn't even take a photograph of it! That doesn't really seem to fit with the nature of the ship - the single rudder and prop, the lack of bow thrusters or anything fancy, the artful turning on the anchor in tight spaces.

      I did manage a picture of the more recent navigation kit though,



      (the steady hand of Captain Lande there)




      Captain Lande told us that they don't generally use the various navigational aids if they can help it, preferring to navigate simply by sight - landmarks by day, lighthouses by night.

      Comment


      • ombugge
        ombugge commented
        Editing a comment
        # 1025/2 is the Controllable Pitch Propeller (CPP) from A.M.Liaaen in Aalesund, which is still in use as far as I know.
        A combination of Pitch and Engine Revolutions (RPM) is used to set the speed during passage and to maneuver in ports.
        This is to avoid having to reverse the engine to go astern, among other functions.

      • billplumtree
        billplumtree commented
        Editing a comment
        OK, thank you. We were told by the Chief Engineer that the engine is run at a virtually constant 190 rpm, so the speed must be controlled almost entirely by varying the pitch of the blades.

      • ombugge
        ombugge commented
        Editing a comment
        That is probably the RPM of the propeller, while the engine is running on a higher speed. If a shaft generator is used the RPM has to be fixed.
        Correction. Having looked closer at this engine it probably is direct drive without gear and with a steady 190 RPM speed.
        PS> The scale on the A.M.Liaaen control is the degree of pitch, not hoped for speed.
        Last edited by ombugge; January 7th, 2015, 09:56.

      And, as if northern lights AND a bridge visit weren't enough, towards the end of the trip we also got a tour of the engine room! Which was just fantastic - poking your head in through the open half-door on the deck for a bit of warmth and to breath in the oily fumes is all very well, but ultimately leaves you wanting more.



      I loved the no-nonsense warning from the Chief Engineer before we plugged our ears and descended into the hot noisy bowels of the ship: "Whatever you do, don't touch the tappy-tappy bits on the top!" So I didn't.


      The business end of the telegraph.


      Er, some dials and a lever...


      Cover plate. AMV = Akers mekaniske verksted, Akers mechanical workshop (but feel free to correct me).

      This was becoming very much not a complete escape from work for me, since the small company I work for sells marine modelling software to Aker. In fact, the first few days in particular had been a succession of sightings of ships and offices owned by either customers or competitors, and it was quite a relief to get to some of the smaller ports further north where life revolved around fish...
      Last edited by billplumtree; January 6th, 2015, 17:15.

      Comment


      • nari
        nari commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks for the engine room pics - I was glad that there were so many interested when I suggested a tour to Asgeir. But I think the third group missed out altogether because of the foul weather we had heading to Bergen!

      • Seagull
        Seagull commented
        Editing a comment
        Thrilled to see the engine room photos Bill, and such excellent ones too. (Given such an opportunity my excitement-level and photo-taking-ability tend to become totally disengaged! )

      • billplumtree
        billplumtree commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks Seagull - yes, it was a bit overwhelming at the time! I've no idea how long we were in the main engine room (Nari?), but it wasn't long enough. It seemed to be over in a quick flurry of noise, smell, and attempts to grab a few photos. I would happily have spent a couple of hours down there

      Yes, it was quite brief -no more than 20-30 minutes. But we were under way so I guess the engineers get a bit concerned some pax might do something silly - I like the way they were smartly dressed in black overalls, clean sturdy shoes and not at all like the engineers I knew in dirty white overalls, often torn, and decrepit shoes. Over the years OH&S has had significant effect on ships?
      I liked the height of the area - on a small ship, it seemed enormous. Old ship with a big heart.

      Comment


        We didn't, fortunately, have guided tours of my cabin, but I thought I'd post a couple of pictures of it as a potentially useful resource. I know that when I was trying to make my choice when booking my trip, I found this forum, and *whisper* some other sites, had pictures and descriptions of various cabins which were tremendously useful in giving an idea of what to expect from the different grades and locations. So, here's a quick peep into cabin 220 on B deck, mostly taken on the first night before I'd unpacked and cluttered it up.


        Bed up. Bathroom door on the left, cabin door facing. The settee was ok, not especially comfortable, but then I hardly used it at all.


        Bed down, taken from the opposite angle - from the corridor, through the open door. The bed, unlike the settee, was very comfortable indeed. Much more substantial than your average sofa bed, but well-balanced so very easy to get out at night and fold up in the morning. No experience of the upper bunk - I wasn't tempted to try it.


        Bathroom (with shower rather than bath). Compact, clean, worked perfectly well for me, although the whole floor invariably got wet whenever I had a shower. Not a big thing, really.


        Desk, tucked nicely into the corner. With handy sockets for charging kit, and drawers for books, laptop, camera gear, and general stuff, so it doesn't all roll around on the desk and then fall onto the floor and roll around there noisily until you get up, in the middle of the night, and put it all away. DAMHIKT (don't ask me how I know this). Note the small pile of Werthers Originals in the corner on the desk, given to me because "You're going on a cruise, so you have to take Werthers Originals, it's the law".

        Looking at the desk photo makes me smile now. I spent quite a bit of time sitting there in that cosy corner in the evenings, happily going through the photographs of the day, when I wanted to be on my own. I seemed to establish a pattern of, broadly speaking, public lounges in the afternoons, hiding away here in the evenings. I was pleased, in a way, with the short duration of the daylight / prolonged twilight - it meant a concentrated burst of taking photographs to make the most of it, then going through them afterwards to see what worked and what didn't, what could be improved, editing the decent ones in Lightroom, and so on. I really didn't know how the trip would work out in terms of what I would *do*: I took four different reading books, and ended up reading about a quarter of one of them (and finishing it on the plane on the way home).



        Porthole, firmly bolted shut for the winter season - and with tamper-proof bolts at that! Thank you, CVF, for warning me that this would be the case. I chose the outside cabin for the extra space and the bathroom anyway, but if I'd been expecting an opening porthole too I would have been very disappointed!

        Comment


          Coincidence! 220 was my cabin in 1997, but hey, the upgraded style after the fish episode looks positively posh.
          A desk! Would have loved such a big desk last trip - A400 had a small one with fire extinguisher to sit on. OK, not quite but it was tiny. And as for water sloshing everywhere during and after a shower...that seems to be a Lofoten tradition.

          Comment


            A few more random ones, if I may, of - well, just things I loved about this trip. The first few aren't Lofoten-specific, for which I apologise, but they were taken from Lofoten and I will always associate them with her. Can I get away with that in this thread?


            That blue light. Repeating myself, I know, but this does at least have Lofoten in it!


            Moonlight, and lighthouses, at Harstad.


            On the quayside in Brønnøysund.


            I loved the tyre fenders, daft as it sounds. So tough and reassuring and functional. The tread patterns emphasised by the angled light reflecting off their wet surface, or by frost or snow.


            The bridges were sensational. What else can you say about them?


            View from the quay of the well-known church at Sortland. Oh, and some refrigeration containers

            Comment


              As usual, great photos. The tyres were fascinating, especially waiting for the inevitable high-pitched sound of severe stress as the Lofoten squeezed against them.
              Do you remember where the bridge photo above was? Looks like the Lofoten Wall.......

              Comment


              • billplumtree
                billplumtree commented
                Editing a comment
                Full marks, Nari! Not far out of Stokmarknes, looking SE. I suppose that makes it the back of the Lofoten Wall?

              The lighthouses deserve a post of their own. Not so much the famous ones, but the tiny little unmanned ones that seemed to be on almost every headland, their bright white walls and red roofs making them stand out reassuringly even in the daylight.





              Comment


                Not sure about the direction re the Wall, but it makes sense to say SE aspect.

                The lighthouse in the first photo on lighthouses reminds me of the Finnmark coast where there would be one house packed against a high mountain and nothing else for miles around.
                Hmm. As my friend on the Bergen -Oslo train said: Norwegians like their solitude. If there is a large field, the man will build his house in the middle of it, rather than close to neighbours.

                Comment


                  Just wonderful! I'm enjoying everything I see.
                  It's perfectly ok to start new threads to document trips. For my last Norway trip I started a thread for the trip itself and then posted the ship specific pictures in their own threads (Lofoten / Finnmarken).

                  A flashback in #1028/3: I have exactly the same model of "shower handle holder rod" in my own bathroom.
                  #1028/5: is that port hole also openable? Well despite from the facts that it's sealed close.

                  Comment


                    I am smiling about the desk lamp in #1028. Was this a provisiorium or was it the original installation? Both would be possible on Lofoten. She has a very pragmatic style, which i love so much.
                    But i can't remeber the desk lamp we had in A-200 on our trip.
                    Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

                    Comment


                    • billplumtree
                      billplumtree commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Ralf, that's how it was when I arrived. Pragmatic indeed - functional rather than pretty, and very likeable for that reason.
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