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ex HARALD JARL ::: ex ANDREA ::: SERENISSIMA :::

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  • Clipper
    replied
    To save me looking back at several dozen pages, have we ever had a report on Serenissima's stabilisers?

    At our first sniff of them, we speculated on how effective they might be, but I don't recall reading anything since.

    Seagull?

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  • pakarang
    replied
    What an amazing journey - I find it so wonderful that the ship seems to be doing so well. Imagine her past life as a coastal steamer in Norway, sailing north and south... then at her retirement, she is sailing to exotic lagoons, bays and ports all over the world. The ship could have met her end after the bankruptcy of Elegant Cruises, but thankfully someone saw that she had a lot more life to give. !

    So thrilled to be looking at these images and thinking about the history of the ship at the same time.

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  • Tommi
    commented on 's reply
    Du borde banta! :-)

  • Seagull
    replied
    Day 16 - 6th February 2017 - Panama City, Panama.

    There could hardly be a greater contrast to the early morning views of the previous days!



    From our anchorage, we transferred by our zodiacs to a pier at the Flamenco Marina. Some guests were taking a morning excursion to see the city, particularly the old French quarter from colonial times. For those wishing to stay ashore independently in the city during the afternoon, or simply visit the shops, cafes and restaurants at the marina, there was a zodiac shuttle service back to the ship.

    I had chosen to take a full day excursion, crossing the isthmus by coach to visit the Canal Expansion Observation Centre in Colon, as well as the visitor centre at Miraflores locks on the return to Panama City.
    The link to my account of the new canal: -
    http://www.captainsvoyage-forum.com/...954#post203954




    Here is the view from Serenissima when I returned later that afternoon.
    Last edited by Seagull; September 11th, 2017, 12:22.

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  • Seagull
    replied
    During lunch the ship departed for the 237 nm journey to our next destination.

    There was a lecture on "Neotropical birds" ...and then the guest lecturer spoke about "The Dramatic Construction of the Panama Canal".

    ...and although it isn't quite the last night yet, we have the Captains Farewell Dinner.

    Last edited by Seagull; September 6th, 2017, 21:43.

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  • Seagull
    replied
    Lunch aboard Serenissima






    The chef offered a special of the day...




    ...but first I enjoyed at least two helpings of this delicious and refreshing soup.

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  • Seagull
    replied

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  • Seagull
    replied


    We made an early start when Serenissima had anchored off Isla Coibra. It is the largest island in Central America, and the largest among a group of smaller islands and reefs that were separated from mainland Panama some 12 to 18 thousand years ago at a period of rising sea levels. This isolation resulted in a divergence of plant and animal species, in a similar way to the Galapogos, but it is estimated that a high proportion of species remain unknown to science. The island's undevelopment and continuing isolation was ensured by its role as a notorious penal colony, and, during the period of dictatorship, a political prison with a fearsome reputation for brutal conditions, torture and killings. After reverting to use as a criminal prison, it was finally closed down in 2004, the remaining buildings in the south of the island left to be reclaimed by jungle. Much of the forested interior is impenetrable and unexplored.

    The island and surrounding waters is now a national park and UNESCO designated Special Zone of Marine Protection. A number of tour operators on the mainland now offer 'ecotours' and scuba diving trips, and the visitor numbers and permits are strictly controlled by ANAM – the National Authority for the Environment. We had the necessary permissions to land our zodiacs at the ranger station in the north of the island.


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  • Seagull
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks Ralf - here's the next day's enjoyment for you!

  • Seagull
    replied
    Day 15 - 5th February 2017 - Isla Coiba, Panama.

    Sunrise in new country and the clock forward by an hour to Panama time!





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  • Ralf__
    replied
    To have a stop with a cruise ship at a place like Golfo Dulce looks like being in paradise. I will not repeat to point out the differences between big and small ships. These pictures speak for themselves. I am enjoying this report very much.

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  • Seagull
    replied


    Back at sea level, we are ready to return to the ship in time for an excellent lecture entitled "What fish is that?" - how to identify fish.



    But I'll end the last day in Costa Rica not with a fish photo but with my choice of that evening's dinner desserts!

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  • Seagull
    replied


    Good to see there had been time for a relaxing moment on the bridge wing for our hard-working crew.
    But it was back to work during the guests' lunchtime, when the ship relocated 10 nautical miles to near the town of Golfito, which is in a small gulf within the much larger gulf of Golfo Dulce.



    Here is the area we landed the zodiacs, and from where I joined a rather more strenuous (i.e. a very up-hill jungle trail) hiking group led by our Costa Rican guide.

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  • Seagull
    replied


    Leaving photos I took in the gardens for more appropriate threads, here is a view from the little beach where we were welcome to swim before returning to the ship for lunch - another nice view of Serenissima in a tropical setting.

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  • Seagull
    replied


    We have reached our destination, though it is almost impossible to believe that hidden here, on the top right of the photo where we will land the zodiacs, there is a botanical garden. This botanists' paradise was established on the site of a run-down cacao plantation in the 1970s by an ex-pat American couple and is known as Casa Orquideas - house of orchids. It can only be reached by boat. As well as orchids there are hundreds of species of tropical plants including ornamental trees, palms, flowers, fruit trees, spices and medicinal plants.



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