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ex HARALD JARL ::: ex ANDREA ::: SERENISSIMA :::

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    Cecilia, I'm having difficulty orienting myself in the three photos #830/2/3/4. Could you annotate a section of deck plan for me please, showing the direction of view in each case.

    I have an affinity with this area as it's where my bicycle was tied up for the duration of my passage back in 1985.
    ---------------------------
    Harald Jarl, Honningsvag to Svolvaer, Summer 1985.
    Deck plan geek.

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      Firstly, Clipper, I do hope the me-in-mirror location agrees with yours! Ask for further discussion if it doesn't!

      The pale lines in the cross passage on the plan would appear to show additions to the ship. These include door symbols at both port and starboard sides, which, as I was not aware of any doors, must have been always in the fully open position if they exist. This isn’t really clear on any photos I have. What is clear is the existence of the two 'walls' which I have underlined in yellow.

      As you see I am standing outside the entrance to what used to be the reception.

      The view looking starboard, #830/2, should now be fairly obvious. It shows things hanging on the new wall where my yellow mark is on the plan. The authorised-personnel-only door on the right of the photo is on the plan, and behind the things next to it you see the top of a white wall also shown as an addition on the plan.

      The view looking towards the port side shows, on the left, the bins standing in front of the cream coloured structure marked XX on the plan, and the lifebelt and other installations on the white wall beyond (bold line on the plan).
      Across the gap to the right side there is the new wall I've marked in yellow, but this is perhaps where confusion arises when looking at the photo. The angle of the lighting and resulting shadows on this wall, plus the equipment attached to it, tend to produce an optical illusion which may cause you think that the wall or part of it is at right angles to what it actually is! It is all in the plane of the piece of wood actually!

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        Cecila, thank you so much. The diagram explains everything.

        I had indeed worked out the mirror photo correctly. I wonder if the people in 410 realised the real porpose of their bathroom :-)

        In #830/2 & #830/3, I had somehow convinced myself that the wooden strakes on the deckhead ran fore-aft and that we were looking in-and-across the ship in both cases rather than out-and-across from the same point. Unsurprisingly, nothing else made sense.

        I can't remember exactly where I tethered my bicycle in 1985. Maybe on the aft wall of the cross passage, starboard side. I know I checked at every port, to make sure it hadn't been unloaded.

        And I'm pretty certain that lift wasn't there in 1985,
        ---------------------------
        Harald Jarl, Honningsvag to Svolvaer, Summer 1985.
        Deck plan geek.

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          Day 10 - Sousse, and an excursion to El Djem, Tunisia

          The first port of call in Tunisia was Sousse, which is located 140 km south of the capital Tunis. We arrived later in the morning, and I had slept later and had a more leisurely breakfast than usual.



          Now out on the bridge wing, I took a couple of photos before getting out of the way of the crew as Serenissima approached the harbour.



          Here you see the Kasbah. The tower, known as Khalef al Fata, still functions as a lighthouse.

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            There was plenty of activity in the harbour, such as around the container ship Roseline A.




            It hadn't been obvious exactly where Serenissima would dock until the ship turned, and I got this nice view. We'll be in the corner, tucked in expertly in front of Umay's bow!

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              It took two joined-up photos to show you all of Umay, which, as you can clearly see, was formerly Lord Hinton.

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                You’ll have realised I was heading to the deckhouse viewing platform to watch the foredeck activity.






                A great shadow view!

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                  View from deck 6




                  We had an early lunch, and then while waiting for the arrival formalities to be concluded (we would require disembarkation cards), there was plenty to keep me entertained! The geared bulk carrier Senata had arrived, assisted by tug IBN Nafaa.

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                    Taken from the excursion bus, driving across flat country with olive plantations.
                    The excursion took us to a town called El Djem (sometimes spelt El Jem), which is famous for its Roman remains. The Romans called this place Thysdrus.

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                      Thysdrus had impressive villas judging by the quality of the mosaics that have been found, some of which are now displayed in the museum.



                      I liked this fishing scene...



                      ...and the animals in this detail of a procession showing Dionysus and a maenad. But, although perhaps not exactly a seagull, that little bird is rather special!

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                        The highlight of a visit to El Djem is undoubtedly the Roman amphitheatre from the 3rd century AD, reminiscent of the Colosseum in Rome and one of the world’s largest.
                        It had remained intact until the 17th century since when much stone has been removed for building, but at one side at least it is remarkably complete. It is now protected as a World Heritage Site.

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                          Film buffs may like to know that some scenes from Gladiator and the Monty Python film Life of Brian were shot here.

                          It was great to have free time after the explanatory tour, enabling exploration of the infrastructure above and below ground. The underground passages are practically intact, and the rooms where the lions for the fights would have been caged.

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                              The highest levels of the amphitheatre also afforded good views of the town and surroundings.

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                                So we returned to Sousse and to the ship, where I took my usual evening view before Serenissima set off for Tunis.

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