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ex HARALD JARL ::: ex ANDREA ::: SERENISSIMA :::

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  • ombugge
    commented on 's reply
    I have stayed mostly "East of Suez" and has been far out in the Pacific as Rarotonga, but never actually crossed the Pacific, (except by plane) or been in any ports on the west coast of the Americas by ship.
    Last edited by ombugge; September 15th, 2017, 14:13.

  • Seagull
    replied


    The gates open, and Serenissima moves forward into the next chamber.

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  • Seagull
    replied
    Look what's coming!




    We get a superb view of Rotterdam towering above us in the other lane.





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  • Seagull
    replied


    A wider view featuring the lighthouse - the Gatun North Bound Rear Light from 1914.




    Time for some action on the foredeck…

    ...and a good view of the mule.


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  • Seagull
    replied
    Gatun Locks

    Right on cue, the sun came out as Serenissima approached Gatun Locks.






    Now don't be confused ...in these locks at Gatun Rotterdam will be in the lane at our starboard side.







    The view looking back over Gatun Lake.


    We seemed to be waiting a while, and two of our crew came out for the view.


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  • Seagull
    commented on 's reply
    You'd have been in your element, Ralf , and you too ombugge - surprised you never have! And thanks for that link!

  • Seagull
    commented on 's reply
    That’s correct ombugge. There are many such navigational aids along the route.

  • ombugge
    commented on 's reply
    A Panama Canal passage that didn't go so well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALVF3BlZV8I

  • ombugge
    commented on 's reply
    I would think they are transit markers; i.e. when in transit (seen one directly above the other) you are in the correct lane in the canal.

    BTW; I have never actually been through the Panama Canal.

  • Clipper
    commented on 's reply
    Looking at 1306#5 and #6, I'm wondering what the white rectangular things on the banks might be. Could they be reflectors for distance telemetry and early detection of slides?

  • Clipper
    commented on 's reply
    A crazy thought just winged out of left-field. How about fitting Sea-Troll out with a dictaphone, then go round doing "Sea-Troll interviews"?

  • Ralf__
    replied
    Yippiieee! A Panama Canal passage reported at CV. And with a former coastal steamer! I love it! And you know my interest for locks. So wonderful, Cecilia! Thank you so much.
    I know that the passage fee is huge! Nearly unbelievable, that Serenissima did it!

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  • Seagull
    replied


    Soon after leaving the lock Serenissima passes beneath the Centennial Bridge. It was built to ease traffic on the Bridge of the Americas, and now carries the Pan-American Highway across the canal.



    We are now in the Culebra Cut (also known as the Galliard Cut), which was excavated across the continental divide and was a challenging achievement for its time, made more difficult by the unstable layers of shale and mud subject to slides. Even today the channel must be maintained by dredging.

    The ship reaches Gatun Lake, which was formed by damming the Chagres River. Former hilltops have become islands. The lake, normally 26m above sea level, serves to maintain sufficient water in the Culebra Cut, as well as in the locks in dryer weather.
    I had seen something of the lake on the previous day's excursion, including the dam, and don't have more photos from the ship - the weather became cloudy for a time with rather poor visibility for decent photos of passing ships and the more distant shoreline. That was the point I realised I hadn't yet had lunch! I’ll be back later!

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  • Seagull
    replied


    I imagine that we also got a greater appreciation of the height of lock gates and the differences in water levels than one would from the upper decks of the Rotterdam. This is apparent in the following sequence at Pedro Miguel - and these are not the highest. (The lower chamber gates at Miraflores are the highest because of the extreme variation in the Pacific tides.)






    The gates are doubled for safety reasons.


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  • Seagull
    replied
    Pedro Miguel Lock and the Culebra Cut

    When I took that last photo from Deck 4, I was actually making my way to the lounge where drinks are available and had a mid morning coffee. Forty five minutes later Serenissima had reached the next single-step lock at Pedro Miguel. If you look at that webcam view Azimut captured and which I linked to in the last post, you can see in the distance where this is relative to Miraflores.



    The entrance lock gates were open and it was just a matter of attaching the lines to the mules, so I am once more on the observation platform to watch the linesmen at work.






    The job of the linesmen involves intense activity interspersed by periods of inactivity. They had set up an area for themselves at the port side of the observation platform deckhouse.



    Here they are during their rest period. It is an amazing job that they do, and on a small ship one feels closer in touch with their work than would be possible on a larger ship. It really feels a privilege. And although we are small we still get an official Panama Canal Guide like the big cruise ships do. The commentary on interesting facts and places we pass during the transit is transmitted on the decks and lounges.

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