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Explorer sinking in Antarctic- Report

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    Explorer sinking in Antarctic- Report

    Continued from the old forums:

    The report of the sinking from the Bureau of Maritime Affairs, Monrovia, Liberia. March 2009

    #2
    Thanks... I'll go on reading that one!
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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      #3
      I have now read the entire report, and I must say, a lot of things happened within a relative short time.

      There are a few points I particularly noted:

      1) Chilean and Argentinian MRCC (maritime Rescue Coordination Centers) both stated THEY had the jurisdiction over the area.

      2) Top of page 18: "The two crw members in the cabin (admin note: 314), jammed pillows down into the space..."

      They must have been desperate thinking that a couple of pillows would eventually stop water flooding into their vessel from a hole under the waterline.

      3) It seems like in addition to the separator room, cabins 312 and 314 were closest to the damaged hull. Whilst the crew worked frantically to get to the holes, I have a feeling the leak in the separator room was only monitored and not properly addressed.

      4) From what I read, the down flooding ducts in the separator room must have failed in some way (not working as they were intended), causing additional flooding to the generator room which also had leaks through the water tight door once the water was 20 cm up the door.

      5) When abandoning the engine rooms, they forgot to close two water tight doors, between Generator Room and Main Engine Room, and the door between Main Engine Room and Shaft Alley.

      6) Another item I don't understand is, after all engine crew had abandoned the ship, the ship suddenly sailed full astern gaining about 8 knots. The emergency shut down of engines from the bridge did not work. What made the engines run full astern?

      The other thing I keep on thinking when reading the report, is the likeness to the Titanic disaster at many points:

      Titanic hit an iceberg at 23:40 hours - Explorer 23:50 hours (estimated)

      Both vessels hit the iceberg with starboard side.

      Order to abandon Explorer was made at approximately 02:35 hours, Titanic sank at 02:20 hours.

      On both ship's two lifeboats were almost lowered on top of eachother (Explorer's boats number 1 and 3)

      Rescue vessel (Nordnorge) picked up survivors at dawn, at 06:25.. not very unlike what Carpathia did at dawn.

      Very interesting report to read.... thinking how fast it can all go wrong, even with all modern equipment and training. I was on the whole, based on my own experiences from cruise ships, quite impressed with the crew of Explorer: they had time working against them, and lots of things happened at the same time, and within a very short time.
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
      Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
      Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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        #4
        Here is a link to an article which was mentioned in the report above:

        http://www.gard.no/gard/Publications...n190/art_2.htm

        M/V NORDNORGE - Antarctic rescue of M/V EXPLORER
        By Captain Arnvid Hansen, Master of the M/V NORDNORGE, Hurtigruten ASA
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
        Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
        Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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          #5
          I have just read the report into her sinking. I must say that it just goes to show how the unexpected can determine the fate of a vessel. By this i refer to the problem of the sewerage system 'back filling' and causing further flooding of additional compartments.

          Yes the watertight door between the separator room and the generator room was leaking, and when the crew abandoned the vessel they left watertight doors open in the main engine room, but even if these conditions had not occurred - the separator door did not leak, and the crew closed all watertight doors, it would seem that the design of the sewerage system would have sealed the vessels fate anyway. From reading the report it seems that the water level in the separator room had risen above the level of the sewage tank that was located in the separator room, sea water flooded the tank via the tanks vents and then forced it's way through the sewerage pipe work into various cabins on the deck above. It's obvious that all the toilets on the above deck were linked to this one tank, so not only was water pouring from the toilets on the deck above the separator room, it was also pouring out onto the spaces above the engine room and other spaces below. This water then simply poured down the 'down flooding ducts' into various compartments below.

          So even if the watertight doors had indeed been 'watertight', it would seem that a badly designed sewerage system had 'sealed' the vessels fate. Like i said, it's always the unexpected that catches you out.

          I cannot understand why the sewerage tank vented into the separator room, but this would appear to be the case, two bits of evidence point to this. The engineer made reference to this happening, plus earlier on in the report it was mentioned that if the hinges on the down flooding ducts situated above the separator rooms were not maintained correctly, then passengers in the cabins above would complain about the smell of sewerage coming up through the ducts.
          So it would seem that the sewerage tank did have vents into the separator room, if the sewerage tank vents vented above the open decks above - IE up in the funnel, then maybe the flooding through the sewerage system would have been prevented.

          I only make such a big point about this because even if all the watertight doors had done their jobs correctly, it would seem that the watertight integrity of the separator room was always going to be breached by the design of the sewerage system - thats something i doubt anyone envisaged when they designed the ship.
          Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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            #6
            Just stumbled on some images from the rescue of the passengers:
            http://www.agefotostock.com/2466waki...ge%20antarktis

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              #7
              Thank you, Tommi, for taking time to find and share those images. I had not seen them before.
              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
              Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
              Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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