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  • #16
    Not sunk but, at first glance, does it look like this ferry has capsized??:

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    • #17
      I can see her as listing, or close to laying flat, to/on her port side. But just for one split second.

      Don't know why they painted her like that, but if you think about that line between the blue and white..., and at the same time think about large modern plastic pleasure crafts..., such a line is possibly ment to set your (our) mint to 'speed'. I don't know....
      "IF GOD COULD MAKE ANGELS...., WHY IN HELL MAKE MAN?"

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      • #18
        Never thought she looked like a capzised ship from the side, but when you said it, I now see what you mean.
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
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        • #19
          Not directly why ships sink but why do they collide?? (Which may cause them to sink as a consequence)
          With all the modern means of communication and information about the traffic around you collisions between ships are still one of the biggest risks at sea.

          Here is one Master Mariner's opinion of why: http://maritime-executive.com/blog/w...we-drove-ships

          Any comment from active Masters, or others??

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          • #20
            Nobody could have missed the news that Capt. Schettino has finally been sentenced and sent to jail for 16 year, (out in less than 5 with good behaviour)
            Nor could you have missed that a VLOC just broke up and sunk in the South Atlantic, very much reminiscent to the Berge Istra, Berge Vanga and Derbyshire incidents in the 1970's.
            How can this happen in our day and age, with safety rules and routines up the ying yang, much better equipment and presumably better vessels?
            The reason may be that the people who man them and run them from shore hasn't improved quite with it. Rules, regulations and routines only work if the are applied and adhered to by all and sundry involved, which they are not always: http://splash247.com/unsafe-draft-part-one/

            Another fairly recent accident, involving an overaged vessels getting into the eye of a hurricane, capsizing and sinking with all hands, alo come to mind.

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