Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Safety of Shipping, 1912 - 2012 Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Safety of Shipping, 1912 - 2012

    Here is some interesting reading for those with an interest in the development of shipping safety the last 100 years: http://www.agcs.allianz.com/assets/P...ing_report.pdf

    It also looks at future development of regulatory regimes in the industry, type and size of ships and the problem of training and qualification of seafarers world wide.

  • #2
    Re: Safety of Shipping, 1912 - 2012

    Downloaded for further bedtime read... thank you for sharing!
    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
    Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
    Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Safety of Shipping, 1912 - 2012

      Originally posted by pakarang View Post
      Downloaded for further bedtime read... thank you for sharing!
      Same here, it's sitting on my desktop just waiting to be read!
      Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Safety of Shipping, 1912 - 2012

        Some development on the Passenger ship front:
        On 31 December 2012, new regulations will enter into force on insurance in relation to liability to pay compensation in case of accidents during the carriage of passengers. The new regulations follow from EU Regulation no. 392/2009 of 23 April 2009 (the Athens regulation) and from act no. 249 of 21 March 2012 amending, inter alia, the merchant shipping act.
        The regulations are to ensure that shipping companies have the financial possibility of paying compensation in case a passenger is injured or dies in connection with a ship accident.

        The provisions enter into force at the turn of the year. Subsequently, a number of Danish passenger ships must not engage in trade without holding a certificate from the Danish Maritime Authority. The certificate is proof that the ship is insured.
        The Danish Maritime Authority urges shipping companies that have ships of the following categories to apply for a certificate as soon as possible:
        Danish passenger ships of classes A, B, C and D engaged in international trade and Danish ships of classes A and B engaged in domestic trade.
        The provisions stipulate that insurance must be taken out for Danish passenger ships of classes A, B, C and D engaged in international trade and for Danish ships of classes A and B engaged in domestic trade. The insurance is to cover the liability to pay compensation in case of passenger injuries following from the Athens regulation mentioned above. Insurance must also be taken out in relation to passenger injuries arising in connection with war and acts of terror.
        These passenger ships must not engage in trade without having a certificate on board proving that insurance has been taken out. Certificates are issued following application to the Danish Maritime Authority on the basis of so-called “Blue Cards”. Please use this form for the application.
        Please forward applications to athencertifikat@dma.dk from 14 December 2012. A fee will be requested of DKK 900.00 per certificate.
        Regulations will also be introduced on the insurance of others ships carrying passengers. You can read more about the provisions on the passenger insurance of large and rather small ships here.
        Reference & Image Credits
        dma

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Safety of Shipping, 1912 - 2012

          More ships > more traffic > more accidents.
          There is nothing anybody can do about it
          Last edited by DarkHour; February 5th, 2013, 10:47.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Safety of Shipping, 1912 - 2012

            I am somewhat surprised by reading that article about insurance. Not surprised that the regulation is coming into force, but very surprised that this is not already in force in the majority of the world?
            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

            Comment


            • #7
              Not safety of Shipping, but safety of Seafarers against unfair prosecution when an accident occur.

              For Masters this may even be from actions by others and totally out of his control. It is all too common to arrest the Master and officers even before an investigation has started, or for accidents caused by others.

              The classical is the MT Prestige, where the Master was prosecuted, although he tried to do the right thing, but was denied safe haven by Spanish, Portuguese and French authorities.

              Here is a video highlighting this problem: https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=492&v=ZhgHD_MEBo0

              Comment


              • #8
                Refr. the above post; Will the Master be arrested for having guns on board, although they were hidden in cars that was part of the cargo??:
                http://www.thelocal.no/20150923/weap...-ship-in-kenya
                Very likely, based on precedents from previouse cases in other places in the world involving weapons or drugs found in the cargo.

                Would the Pilot of a plane bringing passengers carrying contraband in their shipped luggage, or if found in the cargo be arrested?? Most unlikely, but seafarers are treated differently.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The Hoegh Transporter has been freed from detention in Mombasa: http://www.ihsmaritime360.com/articl..._source=Eloqua

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X