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    #91
    ombugge,
    Sorry I was so long in getting back. Thanks for noticing my posts and yes I completely agree with you about the hysteria. Take a look at this website. It is from our local New Orleans newspaper. There are some really cool graphics, images, and a chance for everybody to get a REAL VIEW of the local opinion. Currently there are “scum” Lawyers trying to sue BP over their use of dispersants. A person I know who was a cleanup worker ON SHORE. Worked for 3 days then spent 5 days in the hospital complaining of breathing problems. He feels he is permanently disabled because of BP’s use of dispersants.
    Recently I read an article that says that the chemicals in the dispersants are no more harmful than what is discharged into the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi River. As a matter of fact the pollution in the river is more harmful than the dispersants. WOW huh???

    Here is the link for the local Newspaper: www.NOLA.com
    Bill H.

    Comment


      #92
      At least there are a few people that will be making a good living out of this for the foreseeable future; Lawyers!!!!

      What a circus this build up to become.

      I can see where there will be some opportunists trying their luck. Say an "unemployable" man in his 20s who has never done an honest days work in his life, but happen to live within 100 miles from the Gulf Coast. He gets approached by a greedy lawyer, who cook up some hardship story. He is persuaded to claim that he has lost his "livelihood" because of the "BP spill" and demand compensation for the rest of his natural life, with an assumed 6-digit annual income.

      With your jury system and the defendant being seen as a foreign company, I wouldn't be at all surprised to see such claims being honoured, to the tunes of millions of dollars (Refr. the McDonald coffee scam)

      Comment


        #93
        Ah, so you do understand how things work in the USA.

        Comment


          #94
          Anybody heard how BP are getting on with their 'fishing'? Have not heard anything new for a few days now. The last i heard was that they were happy with all tests concerning the static kill, and were now in the process of fishing for the drill pipe that is still inside the BOP. I am guessing they must have removed the capping stack in order to do this?

          If successful in removing the drill pipe from the BOP they were going to lift the faulty BOP to the surface and replace it with another one. They started fishing last Saturday, but i have not heard anymore since then.

          I guess quite a few questions will be answered, and a few arguments settled once the original BOP in on the surface.
          Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

          Comment


            #95
            Bill, sorry i have not commented on your posts before now. Having now had the time to read them properly, i just thought i had to say it's good to hear someone from the region affected keeping a level head over all of this. And i am sure your not the only one local that can see through all of the hysteria that's been going on for months now.

            Yes mistakes must have been made, but at the end of the day i totally agree with you, this was not done deliberately, nobody wanted this to happen, nobody believed it could happen, it was just a very tragic accident. And like with all accidents, lessons will be learned.

            I still think that it was fortunate that if such a tragedy did happen, that it happened to a company as big as BP. I am sure some of the smaller oil companies in the Gulf would not have been able to financially respond in the way BP have. I think a lot more people should be giving them a bit more credit than they have received.
            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

            Comment


              #96
              Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
              Ah, so you do understand how things work in the USA.
              Maybe somebody should explain to the jury members that BP is actually traded on the NYSE and about 40% owned by American investors, mainly institution like pension fund etc. so "socking it to them foreigners" my jeopardize their pensions.

              Nah, I don't think that will do much difference either.

              Comment


                #97
                Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
                Anybody heard how BP are getting on with their 'fishing'? Have not heard anything new for a few days now. The last i heard was that they were happy with all tests concerning the static kill, and were now in the process of fishing for the drill pipe that is still inside the BOP. I am guessing they must have removed the capping stack in order to do this?

                If successful in removing the drill pipe from the BOP they were going to lift the faulty BOP to the surface and replace it with another one. They started fishing last Saturday, but i have not heard anymore since then.

                I guess quite a few questions will be answered, and a few arguments settled once the original BOP in on the surface.
                I haven't seen anything new lately, but they should have been able to get the drillpipe removed by now, unless they have had some serious problems, or bad weather.

                You are right, the Capping Stack did not have facilities to allow passing tools through it and must be removed to get access to the BOP and wellbore to do "fishing".

                As for whether things will be clearer once the original Deepwater Horizon BOP Stack gets ashore for forensic studies, let's hope so. If arguments will be settled is still debatable. This will be a long and tedious process, with arguments galore. Remember the famous; depends what you mean by "and" (In the Clinton/Monica case??)

                Comment


                  #98
                  The DW Horizon drama is coming towards a close. The well has been killed and sealed with a Cement plug and there is no longer any danger of oil spill from this welbore.

                  Two days ago the DWH BOP Stack was recovered to surface by the Q4000 and is now being the subject of more attention than a Hollywood star. Let's hope they come up with some indisputable conclusion as to why the BOP stack failed to close at the crucial moment. This is important in order to avoid such accidents in the future and to divide the liability justly and fairly between the various parties involved, not just blame BP as the "Owner" and "Operator" of the concession, and therefore solely "responsible" for the way the well design , drilling operation and "Plug and Abandon" procedure and execution was done. It is easy to find something to blame BP for here, but they are not the only one to be blamed.

                  Although they are now able to enter the wellbore from the top and set more retainers and cement plugs, it is still planned to intercept the well at depth to "fill it up" with cement to ensure that there can be no leaks through the annulus at any time in the future.

                  It will be interesting to see what kind of conclusions will come from this whole debacle, and what kind of new rules and regulations will be brought to bear on future deep water drilling operations in the GOM and elsewhere.

                  The three worst accidents involving US Drilling Contractors or Oil Companies, (Ocean Ranger, Glomar Java Sea and Sea Quest sinking) did not bring any meaningful changes to the way things were done, although the loss of life (84, 84 and 92 respectively) has only been exceeded by the Piper Alpha and Alexander Kielland disasters in the North Sea, both of which brought about substantial changes.
                  Last edited by ombugge; September 6th, 2010, 09:00.

                  Comment


                    #99
                    I have just been reading the latest press release on the BP site, nothing new to what Ombugge mentions. But i did have a chuckle when i read one sentance from the press release......

                    The DWH BOP was taken into custody by the US Department of Justice as evidence in its ongoing investigation into the incident.
                    No doubt slapped in handcuffs and dragged off to be read it's rights! (I think it will need a good lawyer)
                    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                    Comment


                      The BP internal report is now available on bp.com.
                      I have just watched the Video presentation and read through the Executive Summary and is totally baffled by the findings and the inaction that appears to have been from those responsible for well integrity and well control.

                      Once they were gaining mud in the pits it should have been "like a red cloth in front of a bull" and the well should be shut in until an explanation was found and the well controlled. (This is known as a "kick" and is not at all uncommon during drilling, but should not happen during P&A)

                      Once the gas had reached the surface it should have been diverted to the lee side through the Diverter lines, away from the rig, not through the Mud Gas Separator (known as the Poor Boy), thus allowed to migrate throughout the unit and into non-intransigent areas.

                      Even more astonishing is the number of equipment failures that contributed to this tragic accident. BOP failed to function as it should, LMRP could not be disconnected, Fire and Gas detection and control system failed to shut down ventilation to the generator rooms. (There are two sparate Generator Rooms on a DP-3 rig)

                      DWH was a DP-3 classed rig, which mean that there are 100% redundancy for all vital systems involved with the DP system and propulsion thrusters. Even so they lost all Main power.

                      When they lost main power, the thrusters would have stopped and the rig would drift away from the location with the wind and current, eventually getting outside the 2% of Water Depth that is allowed.
                      When that happen they tried to disconnect the LMRP from the top of the BOP Stack, but it failed.

                      Even if the well had not been shut in by the normal operation from surface, this sequence of events should have activated the Shear Ram(s) and effectively shut any flow from the wellbore. But this did not happen, because a solenoid in one pod was faulty and the other did not have sufficient electric charge to trigger the function, apparently.

                      I have been on about Acoustic Remote Operation of the BOP Stack, but that probably wouldn't work either as long as both pods wasn't functioning. Even so, it should be compulsory, as the likelihood of the same series of events as here is unlikely to happen again, IA.
                      Last edited by ombugge; September 9th, 2010, 11:30.

                      Comment


                        I have only read the summary so far, but i was also very surprised with the way that the rig was being run. Bad judgement calls, wrong action taken, or action not being taken at the correct time. If this was indeed the case, then we really cannot be surprised that maintenance on the BOP was so poor.

                        I would not say that any corners were deliberately cut, but i can only assume that complacency played a big part in the whole tragic affair.

                        Sadly the decision not to divert the flow overboard must have sealed the fate of the 11 that died. Whether this was a result of someone panicking and making a wrong call, or whether someone had not got the full picture of what was really happening, we do not know.

                        In my view the biggest thing that should be learnt from this tragedy is that there is no room at all for ANY complacency aboard such installations.
                        Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                        Comment


                          The well has been intersected by the relief well and can now be completely sealed from the bottom up. End of the sage, expect for the court cases and enquiries, which will last for years.

                          Comment


                            UK Radio 4 Today programme announced recently that the state of Louisiana is suing Transocean for damages from the oil spill. I don't seem to have heard any thunderings from the White House supporting the action!
                            Ivy

                            "To thine own self be true.......
                            Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                            Comment


                              For those of you who has spent hours watching ROVs at work in the GOM, here is one "dry":


                              And the Manipulator Arms that you have seen working with such great precision:


                              Actually, precision is very much up to the skill of the Operator and his 3D perceptions of a 2D picture on a flickering screen.

                              Young people, who have grown up playing Computer Games, appears to have the best perception, but not necessarily the technical understanding that is also required to be a good ROV "Pilot".

                              Comment


                                The Presidential Commission has come with their draft report on this "Incident" (I wonder if anybody prepared an "Accident, Incident and Near-miss Report per ISM requirement???)

                                It comes as no surprise to me that the blame isn't only BP's, as I have insinuated in earlier posts.

                                The conclusion was that all parties involved had failed in following the routines and applying good judgement. It doesn't appear that Transocean's "Management of Change" policy was followed either. Changes to, or rather bypass of, the prepared procedures appears to have made in the good old way, not according to ISM requirements.

                                I haven't read the draft report, only seen what has been reported in the media, which is probably abstracts to suite an agenda in any case. I noticed that the commission did not find any indication that somebody had ordered rules to be bent to save money, nor that there had been a deliberate decision made on board to that affect. Yet, what came on BBC World News was that saving money was one of the reasons for the incident.

                                I don't think anybody in their right mind would deliberately take unacceptable risk, especially on board the rig, to save money for BP, nor that any responsible person within BP, or Transocean, would order such action against better knowledge.

                                What is the reason that such actions were allowed then??? Lack of understanding of the risks involved, which may be because of lack of formal training and experience on part of the person(s) who held the ultimate responsibility for the way all operations are conducted.

                                Legally, that is the OIM, but in too many cases he gets "over ruled" by the Companyman, or by shore based personnel within his own organization. If he shuts down the rig, or hold up the operation, thus avoiding a possible major accident, this may be seen as "unreasonable" demands. (No accident occurred, what was all the fuss about?) The Operator (BP in this case) may request him replaced according to standard IADC Drilling Contract. NOTE: I DO NOT IMPLY THAT THIS WAS THE CASE HERE.

                                Never mind that there is a "Stop Work" policy, saying that anybody has the right to shut down the operation, if they feel that it is conducted in an unsafe manner.
                                This appears to apply only to small things/small jobs, minor infringements of safety, or a "slip, trip and fall" risk etc., not to the actual drilling operation.

                                How to avoid such accidents in the future??
                                - Clear lines of command, authority and responsibility on board all drilling rigs, and between Drilling Contractors and Operators, incl. their Service Companies.
                                - Better formal education, training and certification of senior personnel on drilling rigs.
                                - Better regulations and control from the authorities side. (Not just more of the same)
                                - Better safety equipment and protective equipment to avoid that such incidents become catastrophes.

                                There have been a lot of talk about the oil spill, but the eleven men that lost their life has hardly been mentioned, except for the first few days. The oil can be removed, or nature will take care of it over time, but those who lost their life will not come back.

                                I'm waiting to see the draft report. The Final Report will only be issued after it has been picked over by parties with special interests, (like the US Gov.) and will not be as important to understanding this event as the present one.

                                Maybe I'm and old cynic, but I been working in the Oil Industry for 36 years, both on the rigs and in shore based management.

                                Comment

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