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    #76
    dont know where,so drop it here.
    not allang,but almost the same amount of ships.
    you can see them on google earth.
    http://www.good.is/post/picture-show...ery/?GT1=48001
    best regards Thijs

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      #77
      Dozens hurt after cruise ship lists

      Dozens hurt after cruise ship lists

      http://www.cnn.com/2010/TRAVEL/04/22...ex.html?hpt=T2
      Last edited by pakarang; April 23rd, 2010, 13:49. Reason: Added description and introduction of posted link.

      Comment


        #78
        Originally posted by Remarc View Post
        Dozens hurt after cruise ship lists

        http://www.cnn.com/2010/TRAVEL/04/22...ex.html?hpt=T2
        I guess this is becoming more and more "common" as the ships get bigger and bigger, and more top heavy... (as in N. Epic)....
        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

        Comment


          #79
          Originally posted by janihudi View Post
          dont know where,so drop it here.
          not allang,but almost the same amount of ships.
          you can see them on google earth.
          http://www.good.is/post/picture-show...ery/?GT1=48001
          The pics on the site are from Nouadhibou Mauritania and can be seen on Google Earth

          Comment


            #80
            Tanker in collision in Singapore Strait

            A Aframax Tanker and a Bulk Carrier has collided off Singapore, causing abt. 2-2,500 tonnes of Bintulu Light Crude Oil to escape from the tanker into the Singapore Strait, one of the most trafficked waterways in the world.

            Details of the circumstances around the collision is not yet known.

            Luckily the Crude Oil is very light and is likely to evaporate quickly in the tropical climate of the area.
            Here is an article from AsiaOne: http://news.asiaone.com/News/AsiaOne...25-218413.html

            Thanks heaven there isn't the same panic about an oil spill here as in Australia, where a Bulk Carrier run aground two months ago and spilled somewhere between 2 - 4 tonnes of Heavy Fuel Oil into waters of the Great Barrier Reef, which also evaporated before it could reach any populated or sensitive areas.

            From the press report at the time you should believe that the entire Great Barrier Reef was in mortal danger, all 2,600 km. of it, from a spill of that size.

            PS> I believe the tanker involved in the incident reported in post # 72 above belong to the same company, American Eagle Tankers, which is a subsidiary of MISC in Malaysia.

            Maybe it is time to inform people that Oil is a biological substance that is broken down in nature. Oils spills occur naturally in the worlds oceans and has always done.
            Last edited by ombugge; May 25th, 2010, 16:25.

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              #81
              Cheonan

              I'm sure everybody has seen the pictures of the Korean warship that was sunk and later salvaged in two parts. Likewise the pictures of the torpedo parts that is said to be proof that it was deliberately hit by a North Korean torpedo. An International group of experts has examined the wreckage and concluded that this is in fact so.

              Having seen these pictures so many times, I'm struck by the fact that the torpedo parts appears to be quite encrusted by barnacles, while there doesn't appear to be any on the wreckage of the ship. (Above the normal waterline that is, even in close-up shots)

              I would have expected the marine growth to be the same on both, if they had been in seawater the same period of time.

              Is it possible that the torpedo parts are from an exercise torpedo fired some time ago and not the one that caused the explosion that sunk the ship?

              China is still studying the evidence presented by the expert group and has not made their findings public yet.
              Last edited by ombugge; May 31st, 2010, 06:54.

              Comment


                #82
                Originally posted by ombugge View Post
                I'm sure everybody has seen the pictures of the Korean warship that was sunk and later salvaged in tow parts. Likewise the pictures of the torpedo parts that is said to be proof that it was deliberately hit by a North Korean torpedo.

                Is it possible that the torpedo parts are from an exercise torpedo fired some time ago and not the one that caused the explosion that sunk the ship?
                Someone else who suspects a hole in the "proof", like me. I haven't actually seen any pics. of the ship though there was one of the torpedo parts shown very briefly on TV. That you've seen the disparity re barnacles is interesting, Ombugge. I've been waiting to hear what the proof actually consists of. Exhibit 1: a broken ship, exhibit 2: torpedo parts. So what is the indisputable link? I've nothing to go on, but I'm not easy about the findings.
                Ivy

                "To thine own self be true.......
                Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                Comment


                  #83
                  Originally posted by wherrygirl View Post
                  Someone else who suspects a hole in the "proof", like me. I haven't actually seen any pics. of the ship though there was one of the torpedo parts shown very briefly on TV. That you've seen the disparity re barnacles is interesting, Ombugge. I've been waiting to hear what the proof actually consists of. Exhibit 1: a broken ship, exhibit 2: torpedo parts. So what is the indisputable link? I've nothing to go on, but I'm not easy about the findings.
                  I don't want to get into a conspiracy theory debate here, as it is quite evident that the explosion that sunk the Cheonan was indeed external and probably caused by shock waves rather than a direct hit, which is consistent with modern Torpedo technology (Creating so called "Bubble Jets" to do the deed) This break the hull open at the bottom, the weakening of the structure does the rest.
                  The damages caused is shown in this illustration taken from net:


                  All I pointed out was that the Torpedo parts shown MAY not have been from the Torpedo that sunk this ship, as the barnacles on the propeller is inconsistent with the time this part must have been on the bottom, said to have been abt. 1 1/2 month:


                  Corrosion on the electric motor and drive also looks quite extensive:


                  I wasn't able to copy the close-up pictures in the Report, but there were no evidence of Barnacles on the upper parts of the ship, which was on the bottom for approx. 1 month. Here is the nearest I could find:


                  The corrosion seen in this picture appears to be in areas where paint has been damaged from the salvage operation:


                  In close-up pictures taken at the impact point there is obviously also evidence of corrosion, but it is hard to tell how many days after the wreck was lifted the pictures were taken. (Corrosion of steel is quicker in air than in water)

                  The level of corrosion on the Torpedo Parts and the wreckage had been considered by the Investigators and found consistent, however.

                  So that only leave the Barnacles as unexplained, as well as how a Submarine Hunter could be unaware of an "enemy" submarine lurking in the vicinity, especially in such shallow water, and in disputed territory????

                  Comment


                    #84
                    Thanks for the pictures and further details, Ombugge.
                    Ivy

                    "To thine own self be true.......
                    Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                    Comment


                      #85
                      I think the situation with CHEONAN and the alleged torpedo attack is a bit mysterious as well...

                      Though, I do not have the correct details, apart from those printed in papers.

                      I think it is a dangerous game they are playing over there, on both sides, and I fear what the consequences of this sinking might have.
                      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                      Comment


                        #86
                        Two Norwegian accident reports recently published:

                        Rapport om undersøkelse av M/S Øyfart - JXVX, forlis ved Grytøya i Troms 6. januar 2009
                        >> http://www.aibn.no/sjoefart/rapporter/2010-05

                        Rapport om undersøkelse av sjøulykke, MS Nordic Sky - LK9524, grunnstøting ved Finnøy i Møre og Romsdal 20. november 2008
                        >> http://www.aibn.no/sjoefart/rapporter/2010-06

                        For your download and reading pleasure.
                        With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                        Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                        Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                        Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                        Comment


                          #87
                          Major fire on bulk carrier

                          A major fire broke out yesterday on the Yeoman Bontrup, a 100000 tonne bulk carrier at Glensanda quarry on the west coast of Scotland. The quarry is only accessible by boat so fire & response teams arrived on barges and by helicopter. The coastguard tug also arrived.

                          BBC News
                          Photo at the scene



                          Glensanda quarry- older photos.





                          Yeoman Bontrup discharching at Thamesport courtesy of UNKIEPAUL on Flickr under a CC license

                          Last edited by Gaelsail; July 3rd, 2010, 12:43.

                          Comment


                            #88
                            Photographs from the fire. I've been talking to people who were there and it was a ferocious fire with access limited because of the inaccessible nature of the site. I'm not sure whether the long structure that can be seen in flames is the conveyor belt where the fire originally started.

                            http://kilchoan.blogspot.com/2010/07...up-ablaze.html

                            Coastguard press releases: Saturday 03 July.
                            Work has begun to salvage the Yeoman Bontrup, the Bahamas registered cargo vessel that caught fire whilst moored at Glensanda Quarry, Lochaber yesterday afternoon.

                            The incident is now under the control of the Secretaries of States representative (SOSREP) who is on scene with the salvage company, SMIT Salvage. The vessel is still has small pockets of fire which SMIT salvage are attending to. Highland & Islands Fire & Rescue are now leaving the scene.

                            In addition to the equipment being flown in from Holland by the salvage company, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) are currently transporting pumps and breathing apparatus to the scene from storage across the UK.

                            Secretaries of States Representative Hugh Shaw said:
                            The seriousness of the fire and remoteness of the location have made this a difficult incident to resolve. The salvage company is now on scene and are working hard to stabilise the vessel and eliminate the pollution threat from the heavy fuel oil on board.
                            Friday 02 July.
                            Clyde Coastguard have been working with Highlands & Islands Fire & Rescue Service to tackle a fire that has taken hold of the Yeoman Bontrup at 3.30pm this afternoon.

                            The Bahamas registered cargo vessel was moored at Glensanda Quarry when the vessel caught fire. The fire quickly took hold and Clyde Coastguard received a request for assistance from the Highlands & Islands Fire & Rescue Service.

                            All crew members are safe and the specialist Highlands & Islands maritime firefighting team (MIRG) has been on scene since 20:15hrs. They were transported to the scene, by a RAF Rescue helicopter from Lossiemouth, with the assistance of Coastguard Rescue Officers from the Portmahomack team.

                            The Secretary of States Representative is working with the vessels owners to organise salvage of the vessel and protect the harbour against pollution. The Coastguard Rescue Tug Anglian Sovereign is on its way to help with the recovery of the vessel.

                            Richard Morgans, Clyde Coastguards Watch Manager said:
                            This is a serious fire. We are working with the Glensanda Harbour Master, Northern Constabulary and the Highlands & Islands Fire Service to extinguish the blaze and minimize the threat of pollution.

                            The MAIB have been informed.
                            Last edited by Gaelsail; July 4th, 2010, 11:05.

                            Comment


                              #89
                              Thanks for these updates Gaelsail, i have not heard anything of this incident in the normal news.

                              I am surprised that this fire managed to spread like it did. From what i can gather her cargo was stone - possibly granite?, so not much scope for a fire hazard there i would of thought, i doubt granite dust is flammable.

                              I agree that the fire shown along the length of the ship is the conveyor belt in question, i am guessing that the burning belt must have dripped molten rubber and flames down into the hold along the length of the vessel.

                              I found this on the internet, a couple of photos of the conveyor belt in question, sadly this incident is not a great advertisement for this company. Sounds like this conveyor was only recently installed on the ship.

                              http://www.bb-conveyors.co.uk/recent...projects2.html (Second from bottom of page - 'Biggest is best')

                              I can only imagine that the crew had some issue with the fire pumps, i cannot understand how a fire like this managed to spread like it did. The belt seems to be contained in an open framework along it's length, so dousing it should have been fairly straight forward. I am wondering if the initial problem with the conveyor caused a power out situation on the vessel, and thus preventing the crew from getting the fire pumps going. But even then i would be a bit surprised, even on our 24m workboat, the MCA always insisted we had a secondary means of supplying water to the hoses in the event of main power failing.

                              But like most incidents, this is probably not as straight forward as it seems, it could be that an overload or fault on the conveyor caused somesort of electrical fire in the main engine room. In that case engine room would have been un-accessible until that was dealt with, and by then the conveyor fire could have been out of control.

                              Who knows, could have been a number of things, but i will keep my eyes open for the MAIB report when it's published.
                              Last edited by Steve.B; July 4th, 2010, 16:05. Reason: typo
                              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                              Comment


                                #90
                                Another news report regarding this incident.

                                http://forargyll.com/2010/07/serious...-at-glensanda/

                                After reading this is am unsure which conveyor started the fire on the ship, from this report it sounds like the fire may have been on a land based conveyor, which then somehow transferred it to the ship.
                                Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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