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    http://gcaptain.com/pickup-truck-hau...ring-incident/

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      I don't think the cargolaw.com website is updated any longer - it was great entertainment for many years:

      http://www.cargolaw.com/index-new.html
      With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

      Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
      Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com
      Old forum: http://captainsvoyage.7.forumer.com/
      Join us: Save the "Kong Olav" on facebook

      Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

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        A large Russian Factory Trawler has sunk in the Sea of Okhotsk off the Kamchatka Peninsula: http://rt.com/news/246061-russian-trawler-far-east-sinks/

        PS> She is already listed on Wrecksite.eu: http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?236086
        Last edited by ombugge; April 2nd, 2015, 07:28. Reason: Add PS

        Comment


        Looks like a bad "punch through" has happened off Mexico: http://gcaptain.com/accident-aboard-...content=261222

        This is what is most dreaded by all Rig Movers and Drilling Contractors.
        What is "punch through"?? It is when the foundation under a leg give way suddenly during pre-loading?
        What is pre-loading?? it is an operation that is done when placing a jack-up rig on a location. Basically it is to prove that the soil strength is sufficient to support the rig. Ballast water is added while the rig is maintained close to the water's surface to simulate the worst conditions that can be expected. (All all three legs are evenly loaded)

        In theory, if the soil give way the rig lists until enough of the hull is in the water to to compensate for the loss of support by buoyancy. The higher the air gap, the more list before equilibrium is obtained.
        In this case it looks like the list is so severe that damage to legs are inevitable. If the hull has cracked, water may enter into tanks around the leg, causing additional weight to be added, thus more penetration/list.
        I have experienced a few "punch troughs" in my time as Rig Mover, but none as bad as this.
        Injuries is most likely from insufficient securing of equipment, or from the evacuation process.

        If you google Jackup Rig Punch through there are some spectacular pictures from previous incidents.

        Comment


          A large modern ferry capsize in the Yang Tse: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...8/1886456.html

          Live update on China Daily here: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2...t_20882364.htm

          A water spout or tornado may be the cause of the accident according to some sources.

          Comment


            Here we go again; the Master and Chief Engineer survived and has been arrested, just in case they may have caused the accident somehow.
            How dear they be alive when passengers died? Is it the slightest possibility that they abandoned ship first?
            Could it be because they were awake and on the bridge due to the bad weather, while most of the crew and passengers were in their cabins and maybe asleep?
            There is no indication that this was anything similar to the Seawol or Costa Concordia.

            From what little is known this appears to be a freak accident, caused by freak weather. From reports so far the River cruiser was not overloaded, in bad condition or in breach of any safety rules.
            ​​It appears that the capsizing was near instant, with little or no time to do anything to evacuate the pax, or even to send a MayDay message.

            This was a River Cruise Ship similar to the type seen in Europe, only with more decks:

            (This one has less decks than most Yangtze Cruisers)

            It is classed and designed for River operation, with shallow draft and relatively low free board and down flooding angle. If hit by strong wind broad side on the relatively tall superstructure the windage factor could have heeled her over enough to flood the lower deck. Any deck opening or door to accommodation spaces being open could cause near instant loss of stability and capsizing.

            There will be an inquiry and the facts will come out. There is no need for remarks about "Chinese standard, if any" and "typical Asian Captain" etc. which is already appearing in the media.


            Comment


            • Seagull
              Seagull commented
              Editing a comment
              Always greatly appreciate reading your comments when something like this makes the news.

            Celestyal Crystal, the formal Sally Albatross, continues to have some bad luck in service, now in a collision with the oil tanker STI Pimlico:
            http://www.seanews.com.tr/news/15062...rdanelles.html

            Comment


              Ex Norwegian ferry "Vikingen", lately more known as "Harley Davidson I" has taken in some water in Estonia:
              http://epl.delfi.ee/news/eesti/parnu...es?id=71773833

              Comment


                The band new Kvitbjorn run on a rock off Ulsteivik: http://www.smp.no/nyheter/soere/article11253874.ece

                How could this happen with all the navigation aids available on board??? Simple, nobody look out the window, only at their multiple screens!!!
                The reality is out there in the real world.

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                  the salvaged bow section of the ''baltic ace in Rotterdam at the smit yard.

                  stil many cars inside



                  best regards Thijs

                  Comment




                    best regards Thijs

                    Comment






                      and how they do / did it.

                      http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=...A367AFE485C7CA
                      best regards Thijs

                      Comment


                        It is not clear in the video how the cutting operation is actually done. One vessel lowers a long arm from which what is presumably the cutting tool extrudes and passes beneath the sunken vessel. But what then?
                        Ivy

                        "To thine own self be true.......
                        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                        Comment


                        • ombugge
                          ombugge commented
                          Editing a comment
                          They probably used a "diamond wire" to cut the part that was in the mud. The operation you see is to create a path through which the wire can be passed. (Similar to drilling vertical section of an oil or gas well)
                          Since this wreck is in shallow water they may have used divers and oxy/arc cutting on the exposed part.

                        Thanks, Ombugge. So another vessel would capture the far end of the wire. Would it then be used as a saw, i.e. to and fro, or reeled steadily from the winch (or whatever) on one vessel to that on the other? And maybe back again.
                        Ivy

                        "To thine own self be true.......
                        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                        Comment


                        • ombugge
                          ombugge commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Since this salvage was done by Smit they probably used their patented underwater cutting tool: http://www.marinelink.com/news/artic...em/321516.aspx

                        • wherrygirl
                          wherrygirl commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Perfect. Many thanks, Ombugge for hunting that out. By mentioning the problem of what I now know is called "wear resistance" it also answered another question at the back of my mind - would the "cutting wire" be reusable?

                        • janihudi
                          janihudi commented
                          Editing a comment
                          i saw that too,that the cutting was ''smooth'' ,though i got the kursk book of the salvage i forgot that cutting rope.
                          i thought that it would be done with a chain with pointy iron welded on the chainlinks.
                          but here is the video of raising the kursk,with at 6,00 minutes the cuttingrope on a test.if intrested there are more video's about it.

                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTcogT-m2mk
                          Last edited by janihudi; July 4th, 2015, 07:44.

                        I started looking at the raising of the Kursk in that video, Thijs, but am going to bed now and will study it properly tomorrow. Many thanks.
                        Ivy

                        "To thine own self be true.......
                        Thou canst not then be false to any man."

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