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    #46
    Originally posted by ombugge View Post

    For an Indonesian (or Malay, Filipino or Thai for that matter) it is VERY impolite to question authority, or to say NO to a Superior.
    I certainly understand what you are saying, we have had some brilliant Filipino crew in the past, really great guys that really would not stop work for a break unless you literally ordered them to do so. It took me a week to stop them calling me sir everytime i saw them! I have never known a crew as helpful as they were. I would to struggle to find fault with virtually any of the Filipino crews i have worked with in the past. And like you say, i never knew them to question anyone in authority. In a way that is a shame, because sometimes it can lead to a little bit of hesitancy before they speak up about a problem.

    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
    If you were there, and the situation developed like above, you would no doubt have released the brake without waiting for order?
    Well, on Datchet with my own skipper i am sure i would release the tow if the need arose. But, with a different skipper that i was not familiar with then maybe i would be more hesitant, probably because with my own skipper i just got to know what was normal and what was not. I have found in the past that different skippers tend to have slightly different ways of doing things.
    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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      #47
      These past several posts have been a very ineresting read.

      Comment


        #48
        Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
        I think this guy was lucky not to get cut into pieces. I wonder if in future he will use the kill-cord and maybe wear a life jacket?

        Mind you, having said that, im guilty of not using the kill-cord in the past myself, I think this video clearly shows why you really should use it!

        How stupid. He even does not try to swim away... This especially touches me, because there are houseboaters around. Nobody really acts right in this situation. Not him, not the guys on the houseboat and also not the man with the camera or his houseboatboat crew... Both boats have the equipment to get him out of the water. And they should try to go between the man and the boat to protect him.
        Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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          #49
          Okay, so who's at fault here? Who should have moved? Or more over how in all that water did they collide?

          Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

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            #50
            Originally posted by Ralf__ View Post
            How stupid. He even does not try to swim away... This especially touches me, because there are houseboaters around. Nobody really acts right in this situation. Not him, not the guys on the houseboat and also not the man with the camera or his houseboatboat crew... Both boats have the equipment to get him out of the water. And they should try to go between the man and the boat to protect him.
            Contrast this video with news footage of the Airbus that made a forced landing in the river next to New York City. The jet had hardly come to a stop before ferries and boats were allongside taking off the passengers. I really love watching the news footage and especially watching the boats and how professionally they were operated. Even though the current is strong I did not see a single boat crash or even bump into the floating aircraft. It just shows that professionalism and seamanship can save lives in protected waters.

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              #51
              Originally posted by SaintsFCFan View Post
              Okay, so who's at fault here? Who should have moved? Or more over how in all that water did they collide?
              I have often wondered about this one, seeing that neither boat seems to have taken any avoiding action whatsoever, one can only assume that the drink had been flowing far too freely on each of the boats. The person at the helm of both of the boats obviously had his/her mind and eyes elsewhere.

              It's frightening how people will happily take their friends, family and children etc out on a boat, and think nothing about drinking. It is every bit as bad as drink driving on the road - even worse if you consider that in a car you are normally strapped in your seat, and that your car will not sink if it hits something.

              How did they manage it in seemingly miles of open sea? Anyone that's done a watch on a boat will know this one - you will be sitting there enjoying a nice quiet watch, nothing showing on the radar set on a six mile range. But you can guarantee that when something does pop up on your screen and you work out its speed and course, you just know that in 3 1/2 miles time it will want to occupy the very same little bit of the ocean that you will want to!
              Last edited by Steve.B; September 27th, 2009, 01:04. Reason: correcting typo
              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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                #52
                This is from this afternoon that I took myself. The guy got stuck (we think) on the concrete sill of the lock gates, this was about an hour into it 5pm. The only thing that would release him would be the Trent tide turn (6:40pm). I don't know if gunning the engines was the right thing to do, considering what could be underneath holding him.

                Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

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                  #53
                  And here are a couple of photos to go with the video.

                  Here is getting stuck the 1st time. The Lock Keeper trying to flush him loose with water power!


                  This time stuck solid.
                  Infamy, Infamy.... They've got it in for me! Said The Laughing Assassin.

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                    #54
                    Originally posted by SaintsFCFan View Post
                    This is from this afternoon that I took myself. The guy got stuck (we think) on the concrete sill of the lock gates, this was about an hour into it 5pm. The only thing that would release him would be the Trent tide turn (6:40pm). I don't know if gunning the engines was the right thing to do, considering what could be underneath holding him.
                    Totally agree with you... it could be wise to wait for the tide, unless you have a desire to rip open the entire hull. Though, I'm sure the lock master also knows what it could be and what it could not be. Needless to say, not a good situation to end up in anyhow.
                    With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                    Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                    Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                    Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                    Comment


                      #55
                      In my opinion the lock master was quite optimistic to let him down at this tide. The first picture seems to be still inside the lock so it would have been better to lift him up again...

                      The boat does not seem to ly extraordinary deep in the water, although the skipper is not very slim.
                      Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

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                        #56
                        Not quite an accident, but he would not want to be much closer. Come to think about it, I doubt you or I would want it to be anywhere near that close!

                        Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Originally posted by Steve.B View Post
                          Not quite an accident, but he would not want to be much closer. Come to think about it, I doubt you or I would want it to be anywhere near that close!
                          Very close indeed...
                          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                          Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                          Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                          Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                          Comment


                            #58
                            That video sent chills up my spine remembering when I caught a bridge with the mast. Not a fun day.

                            Comment


                              #59
                              Originally posted by pilotdane View Post
                              That video sent chills up my spine remembering when I caught a bridge with the mast. Not a fun day.
                              How did you it go that day...? Did you end up with a lot of expensive damages, or was it mostly cosmetic damages only?
                              With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

                              Administrator and Owner of CaptainsVoyage.
                              Main page: http://www.captainsvoyage.com

                              Surround yourself with positive, ethical people who are committed to excellence.

                              Comment


                                #60
                                I think I posted about it long ago in the old forum.

                                It was a chartered 40 foot Beneteau Oceanis. The paperwork for the boat listed the original mast height. The documentation was not updated when a new tall rig was installed so... After a days sailing I was motoring into a new harbor and crossing under a road bridge. We should have easily cleared with several extra feet of safety margin but no... I hit the bridge about 1 foot from the top of the mast. On top of the mast was a flat plate for mounting instruments and antennas. Even at 2-3 knots the mass of the heavy keel carried the boat forward as the plate on top of the mast hooked the bottom of the bridge "I" beam. Since the mast was fixed at the top and the boat kept going forward the stern was forced under water. Solid water poured over the stern and I was instantly standing in waste deep water. The surge of water somehow shut down the engine and the tide was entering the harbor, continuing to push the boat further under the bridge. Since the engine ignition/starting controls were located on a panel behind my ankles (3-4 feet under water) and my arms were too short to reach the panel I held my breath, went under and was able to get the engine started. With the engine running I was able to back out from under the bridge. Once free from the bridge the stern rose with seat cushions floating around me in the cocpit. Solid water poured out the scuppers for a minute or two and as the stern lightened she came back to even trim.

                                The boat was hauled and inspected and luckily the only damage was a bent forestay and there was a small tear in the roller furling jib.

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