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  • Re: Random maritime accidents.

    I have just found this interesting video on YouTube of the MS Emsstrom about to depart from Germany 4 days ago.

    I am not sure what is going on in the video though. Two harbour tugs have her in tow and it looks like they are about to take her out beyond the breakwater in order for the main tug to take over - you can see the Christos waiting nearby. You will also notice that the Emsstrom seems to have quite a list to starboard. The tugs get out past th breakwater, then they stop and bring the Emsstrom back into the harbour, again, her list to starboard is evident. The Emsstrom is then tied up alongside the jetty. This is where the video ends.

    Now, i am not sure what is going on, either they brought her back in because they realised the ship had a problem - listing to starboard, or they decided they would transfer the tow whilst in the shelter of the harbour wall. Have a look. The video was uploaded on the `10th - 4 days ago.

    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

    Comment


    • Re: Random maritime accidents.

      Sadly, just 4 days later her final moments afloat and sinking are captured on a local webcam.




      And another news report that shows film of her laying nearly on her side shortly before she sank.
      Last edited by Steve.B; January 14th, 2013, 23:19.
      Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

      Comment


      • Re: Random maritime accidents.

        I can't find any actual information about the accident in the German press. But it is mentioned in the older articles, that she stuck firmly in the mud in the harbour of Leer. Maybe this caused a hidden damage?
        Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

        Comment


        • Re: Random maritime accidents.

          The tug as now reached Portland under tow. She will enter the harbour there for repairs later today. Divers had made temporary repairs to the 40cm hole in her hull.

          The news is reporting that the incident occurred at about 21.30 on Sunday evening when the tug slowed to check a problem with the tow, she was then struck on the port side amidships below the water line.

          Here is a clearer video from the BBc news that shows the final seconds of the Emsstrom, very hard to tell from the video, but the bulbous bow does seem to be a little flatter looking than normal - no doubt a result of striking the tug. I am no expert, but i doubt a small blow to the bulbous bow would be enough to cause her to sink so quickly, so i would not be surprised if we learn in the future that she was sinking before they collided, could well be the reason the tug was stopping in the first place.

          http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-21007236

          I can't find any actual information about the accident in the German press. But it is mentioned in the older articles, that she stuck firmly in the mud in the harbour of Leer. Maybe this caused a hidden damage?
          I am still trying to work out what was going on in that YouTube video i posted earlier. I am guessing that was filmed after they had freed her from the mud in her berth? Or, did she run aground whilst being towed out of the harbour by those two harbour tugs? Maybe that was why she seemed to suddenly list? Either way, something was not going to plan, those two harbour tugs certainly looked as if they were bringing her out to the larger tug, but something made them change their plans rapidly.

          I will keep my eyes open for news, and no doubt the MAIB will be conducting a full investigation into the incident.
          Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

          Comment


          • Re: Random maritime accidents.

            Have I mentioned that ships tend to get abandoned way too easily these days??
            Here is another example: http://www.vesselfinder.com/news/833...mber_209059952

            Another rescue that wasn't.

            Comment


            • Re: Random maritime accidents.

              Originally posted by ombugge View Post
              Have I mentioned that ships tend to get abandoned way too easily these days??
              Here is another example: http://www.vesselfinder.com/news/833...mber_209059952

              Another rescue that wasn't.
              Hai Dong 27?, makes you wonder what happened to the other 26 Hai Dong's?, perhaps their all floating around out there somewhere?

              But seriously, makes you wonder about the affairs of the company. Maybe in financial trouble, ship not insured - hence no tug or rescue vessel in attendance? The report states that the vessel was abandoned on the night of the 20th of January, but it does not say when the fishermen discovered it, maybe they came across it the next morning before any tug or rescue vessel arrived at the location?
              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

              Comment


              • Re: Random maritime accidents.

                MV Lyubov Orlova is drifting on the Atlantic Ocean:

                (source: Wikipedia)

                As of January 28, 2013 the Lyubov Orlova, has been drifting off the southeastern end of the Avalon Peninsula in Canada. The derelict vessel had been tied up in St. John's harbor for over two years and was being towed to the Dominican Republic to be scrapped. Just one day after leaving the dock, on Thursday, the tow rope broke. The crew of the tugboat that had the old cruise ship under tow will try to reconnect the line. Sea conditions have improved throughout the night, but the winds were recorded at about 35 kilometers an hour this morning; the waves were up to three meters high.

                As of February 1, 2013, Transport Canada announced this morning that the offshore supply vessel, Atlantic Hawk, with a 157 tonne continuous bollard pull rating. has successfully gained control of the driftng ship and it is no longer a risk to oil and gas operations in the region. To clarify however, the Atlantic Hawk is under contract by Husky Energy and was tasked to regain control of the drifting vessel. The Charlene Hunt, a tug owned by American tug operator Hunt Marine, was initially contracted to tow the ship south to the Dominican Republic.

                As of February 4, 2013, Fearing a possible collision with oil and gas installations off eastern Canada, the Lyubov Orlova was secured by the Atlantic Hawk anchor handler on the 31st of January however, after the ship drifted into international waters yesterday, Transport Canada has decided to cut her loose. “The Lyubov Orlova no longer poses a threat to the safety of offshore oil installations, their personnel or the marine environment. The vessel has drifted into international waters and given current patterns and predominant winds, it is very unlikely that the vessel will re-enter waters under Canadian jurisdiction,” the department said in a statement. Safety concerns were cited by Transport Canada in their reason to not pursue a salvage operation to retrieve the ship.

                The ship is is located at approximately 250 nautical miles east of St. John’s, NL (approximately 50 nautical miles outside Canada’s territorial waters) and drifting northeasterly. If left alone she could end up almost anywhere from the Norwegian arctic, to western Africa, or stuck in the middle of the North Atlantic Gyre. Transport Canada reiterates that the owner of the vessel remains responsible for its movements, and they note that measures have been taken to monitor the position of the drifting ship.

                Video:
                http://ntv.ca/abandoned-ship-lyubov-...y-leaves-port/
                Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

                Comment


                • Re: Random maritime accidents.

                  I would say that was rather irresponsible of the Canadian authorities to just cut her loose once she was out of their waters. In fact it annoys me that they should do such a thing. That ship could now end up beaching or becoming a hazard anywhere. I hope the winds change and she is blown back towards Canada! You would have thought the least the Canadian Authorities could have done was let their Navy use her for target practice and sink her in deep water, at least then she would not be turning up on another countries shore before too long.
                  Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                  Comment


                  • Re: Random maritime accidents.

                    More information today on Massmondmaritime:

                    "One of the owners of the MV Lyubov Orlova is now looking to tug companies in Ireland to possibly intercept the drifting cruise ship.

                    Reza Shoeybi, who bought the ship with his uncle, is now solely making the decisions on the ship’s fate, though his uncle is still a silent partner. And as the Orlova drifts closer and closer to Ireland and further and further from Newfoundland and Labrador, the next chapter of the misguided salvage job may be written from across the pond.
                    “I’m not having any luck here,” says Shoeybi with regards to finding a ship willing to chase the Orlova. He says he is still in communication with one tug company on this side of the ocean, but with the weather not likely to unclench its fists for some time yet, the Orlova could soon be making headlines in the Irish papers. Shoeybi is currently staying on the Charlene Hunt in St. John’s harbour, the tug Shoeybi brought up from Rhode Island to guide the Orlova down to a Dominican Republic scrap yard. The towline between the vessels broke a day after leaving St. John’s and the Charlene Hunt was ordered back to port by Transport Canada out of concern for the vessel and crew. Still, Shoeybi maintains the Hunt could have done the job under different circumstances. “I probably could have done it with this boat if it was in summertime,” he says, standing next to the tug. That’s a statement a number of people would likely disagree with.

                    Mac Mackay writes several blogs including “Shipfax” and “Tugfax.” He’s also a guest on CBC Radio’s “Information Morning” out of Halifax, N.S., every second week for a segment called “Harbour Watch.” In a previous interview with The Telegram, Mackay said he was astounded to see the Charlene Hunt in Halifax when it arrived last fall. On Tuesday, as the Orlova drifted further eastward across the Atlantic, its story finally headed inland, all the way to Parliament Hill. The federal Opposition weighed in saying it is irresponsible of Canada to abandon the derelict Russian cruise ship as it drifts in the North Atlantic. NDP transport critic Olivia Chow said Transport Canada never should have allowed the Lyubov Orlova to be towed out of port in St. John’s in the dead of winter.
                    Tug’s appearance questionable, Looking at the Charlene Hunt tied up on the southside of St. John’s harbour, the boat certainly doesn’t scream dependability. With garbage bags strewn about the deck and plywood up to one of the wheelhouse windows, the boat barely seems able to fight the wind cutting at her as it blows through the narrows, let alone what is waiting out to sea through the rocky harbour gates.
                    As Shoeybi speaks, several people watch from the wheelhouse. Last weekend the Transportation Safety Board sent down a crew to do an investigation as to why the tow line snapped between the Hunt and the Orlova in the first place.
                    Transport Canada also did an inspection of the tug after it ordered it back to port. The supply vessel the Atlantic Hawk eventually got a line on the Orlova when it drifted within 11 kilometres of the Hibernia platform. The tow was transferred to another ship. but that line also failed and the Orlova was free once again, this time in international waters. Transport Canada now says inspectors identified deficiencies with the Charlene Hunt and the tug can’t leave until those issues are corrected, it is reinspected and Transport Canada releases it from detention.
                    Shoeybi says it has been recommended he not try and finish the job of getting the Orlova to the Dominican with the Charlene Hunt. However, he says since the Orlova is in international waters, he has the right to do as we wishes once he leaves port. “Once we get out of here it’s pretty much our call,” he says.
                    Shoeybi adds he wouldn’t pursue the Orlova with the Hunt because of what he’s heard about the conditions on the water and the position of the Orlova. There are questions as to why the Charlene Hunt was allowed to leave port with the Orlova undertow in the first place when it seems, in retrospect, that the mission was doomed. For his part, Shoeybi put faith in a positive outlook. “We were positive throughout the whole thing because everything seemed to work out even though there was a lot of things against us,” he says. That may be something of an understatement.
                    Mackay told The Telegram the tug was in such a state of distress when it made its way into Halifax from Rhode Island before striking out for St. John’s that pumps were air-dropped to the boat to keep it afloat, and the entire crew except for the captain and engineer were evacuated by the coast guard.
                    Shoeybi says they made the attempt to tow the Orlova with the Hunt on Jan. 23 because they were feeling pressure from parties he doesn’t want to name to get the Orlova out of here.

                    The derelict cruise ship sat in St. John’s harbour for two years. Following the sale of the ship to Shoeybi and his uncle, the port authority told The Telegram they were out more than $100,000 for fees the ship incurred during its stay, but would never collect. No doubt, a lot of groups and individuals wanted the derelict cruise ship, that was found to be rat infested, out of the harbour.
                    Shoeybi says he figured if they took enough precautionary measures, things would work out. He and his uncle bought the ship for $275,000. He says the Orlova is insured, but only for a total loss under tow. The ship may be decrepit, but at this point it’s not considered a total loss and, of course, isn’t under tow.
                    The Lyubov Orlova was insured for US$850,000, says Shoeybi.
                    Shoeybi says unless another group comes forward with an interest in the Orlova, the ship is still destined for the scrap yard. They expected to make between $700,000 and $800,000 when they scapped the Orlova depending on metals markets. In the meantime, he has to get the Charlene Hunt back to its owner Hunt Tugs & Barges, Inc. in Rhode Island, the company it was charted from. When questioned about whether he’ll bounce back financially from his ordeal with the Orlova, he pauses. “It’s going to be tough,” he says, but adds that he has partners and projects to help him gain his buoyancy. As for the Orlova?
                    Monday, the vessel was approximately 330 nautical miles northeast of St. John’s and still at the mercy of the ocean currents. “It’s in God’s hands right now so I can’t say nothing,” Shoeybi says. Regardless of one’s faith, both environmental groups and concerned citizens are starting to wonder who’s hand should be guiding the Lyubov Orlova as it continues to drift through international waters. Source : The Telegram


                    The"LYUBOV ORLOVA seen last year April in St. Johns - New Foundland. Photo : Capt Harm Jongman ©
                    Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

                    Comment


                    • Re: Random maritime accidents.

                      Reading all of that strengthens my annoyance with the Canadian authorities. Not only did they abandon her once she was in international waters, but it seems that they should never have let her leave port in the first place! Sounds like the tug was not fit for the job at the best of times, let alone in the middle of winter. I can understand the harbour master wanting rid of her after 2 years, but he should have never let that come before safety, neither should the maritime authorities. They seem to have had a very lax attitude to the whole affair.

                      In my old job we used to take on the odd tow job that maybe by rights we should not have - pushing poor old Datchet to her limits. In such cases we ourselves would use common sense, such jobs would only be undertaken during the summer months, and then only if we had a more than positive weather forecast on our side to cover our time on passage, or at least to our next available safe port of call. And of course we also had to satisfy the local port authorities and the maritime and coast guard agency before they would even think about giving us the paperwork needed to make the passage. If we had turned up on scene in the middle of winter to undertake some of those jobs there is no way on earth we would have been given permission to even think about leaving port with our tow.

                      But we always used common sense, if we knew we would be pushing the boat to near her limits, there is no way we would even consider undertaking the job in the middle of winter. It seems that common sense just went straight out of the window with everyone concerned in Canada on this job.
                      Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                      Comment


                      • Re: Random maritime accidents.

                        Some information about the vessel, published by maritimematters.com:

                        "The LYUBOV ORLOVA was built by the Brodogradiliste Titovo shipyard (Yard number 413) at Kraljevica, Yugoslavia. The ship was named after one of Russia’s most famous actresses of both theater and cinema. Fedor Shalyapin, who would later have a ship named after him as well, predicted her future as a famous actress when she was only seven years old. The ship was one of eight sisters built between 1974 and 1977 for various Soviet companies in the former Yugoslavia. The others in the class were the MARIYA YERMOLOVA, ALLA TARASOVA, KLAVDIYA YELANSKAYA, OLGA ANDROVSKAYA, OLGA SADOVSKAYA, ANTONIA NEZHDANOVA, and MARIYA SAVINA. Besides the LYUBOV ORLOVA, the MARIYA YERMOLOVA, and the ALLA TARASOVA went on to careers serving western passengers as expedition ships primarily in the Arctic and Antarctic regions. The latter became fairly well known as the CLIPPER ADVENTURER and still sails under the name SEA ADVENTURER. Since 1996 the LYUBOV ORLOVA had been owned by the Lyubov Orlova Shipping Company Ltd, of Novorossiysk and operated by a variety of charter operators. When her owner’s defaulted, the ship was sailing under charter to Cruise North Expeditions on cruise service in the Canadian Arctic. Cruise North are reportedly owed $251,000 of the $750,000 in debt claims that have piled up against the vessel. The company is owned by the Inuit, First Nations People of Canada. For the summer season 2013 they plan to operate cruises with the former sistership SEA ADVENTURER. Both vessels have also been used by Quark Expeditions in Antarctica.

                        The LYUBOV ORLOVA is 328 feet in length with a 53 foot beam and a draft of 15 feet. Normal passenger capacity as an expedition ship was 110 passengers. She is now drifting around the North Atlantic as a ghost ship on a final cruise, with no one aboard. Destination unknown."

                        ...in the old forum i had the idea to refurbish some of these ships as winter ships for Hurtigruten, i have the theory, they are much cheaper to run than the big new ones. But there is also the freight contract.. But this goes far OT.

                        We will see and watch what will happen with her. If she will sink, it is a reckless method of getting rid of a ship. Shame on you Canada!
                        Lofoten '07 ...... Nordnorge '11

                        Comment


                        • Re: Random maritime accidents.

                          On first reading Ralf's report at #487 my initial reaction was to wonder what the legal position was vis-a-vis Transport Canada. Yes, it is the owner's final responsibility as to what eventually happens, whether it causes an accident at sea or whether it beaches somewhere. However, given that TC once had it in tow, then deliberately loosed it as soon as it was in international waters, surely places part responsibilty for the outcome in their court, apart from the moral aspect.
                          Last edited by wherrygirl; February 8th, 2013, 20:40.
                          Ivy

                          "To thine own self be true.......
                          Thou canst not then be false to any man."

                          Comment


                          • Re: Random maritime accidents.

                            Carnival cruises in the news again. Maybe something wrong with their engines???

                            http://www.cnn.com/2013/02/11/travel...html?hpt=hp_t4

                            Comment


                            • Re: Random maritime accidents.

                              The fire still left the ship with 3,143 passengers and 1,086 crew members adrift without propulsion, the cruise line said.
                              The ship is expected to arrive in Mexico late Wednesday, and passengers will be flown back to the U.S. on a chartered aircraft.
                              They have obviousness chartered the largest aircraft in the world. A380 has nothing on this one.

                              Comment


                              • Re: Random maritime accidents.

                                There must not be much going on in the world these days. All the News agencies are reporting everything and anything they can about Carnival Triumph, in fact they are even speculating what might be happening. Oh my God...you would swear the ship was sinking. She had a fire that disabled her, she has limited power, washrooms not working, lack of food, not being able to get into cabins, no A/C, "I want to go home" and on and on. What do people expect when you are out on an ocean (or Gulf) and a malfunction occurs. You can't magically pop the ship back to port and you absolutely can't call the local repairman. It seems the cruise line has done and is doing pretty well all they can at this point of time and I'm sure if things got much worse or became dangerous the coast guard or navy would step in and take control.

                                Sorry, just had to rant.

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