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    Re: Random maritime accidents.

    Not the outcome anyone wanted, but i suspected she would start to break up. Amazing what a few metres of swell can do to a ship in such a position. But i do not think she will come apart without putting up a fight, remember how long it took the experts to separate the Napoli at her fracture line? Mind you she only spent a couple of days flexing at sea before they purposely ran her aground on a flat seabed. Very different to being stuck on rocks with the vessel continuously flexing in the swell.

    Would i be correct in thinking that these container ships are quite a bit stronger along their length than say a bulker? With a bulker loads are fairly easy to determine and manage. But i know with container ships that a lot of the time they will not be loaded in the same even fashion like a bulker would. A compromise between loads being spread evenly, and the necessity to have containers loaded in a certain order for delivery purposes. I have heard about some companies pushing the limits between safety and having the ship loaded economically. I remember talking to one of the security guards at a local shipyard at the time of the Napoli incident, he used to work at Southampton and he said he was very surprised that more 'Napoli' style incidents had not happened with container ships because of the way they were often loaded with very bad weight distribution - profits come first i guess.

    Anyway, back on topic, thank you indeed for all these updates, nothing on the news here about it. I can imagine how people will be pouring over that ships manifest and loading plan, trying to workout what nasty stuff is in immediate danger of being lost overboard.
    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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      Re: Random maritime accidents.

      Latest from Shipwreck Log on the Rena debacle:
      Rena is settled on the reef, but is moving around a little with high tides. The next tide is at 9am. The salvage master and the head of the MNZ salvage unit are going out at first light to do an observation flight. They will make an assessment of the vessel and a plan will be developed to get the salvage crew back on board the vessel if it can be done safely. Human safety must be the priority and no action will be taken that will put lives at risk.

      The second officer will appear in Tauranga District Court this morning facing one charge laid by Maritime New Zealand (MNZ) under section 65 of the Maritime Transport Act (MTA) 1994, “for operating a vessel in a manner causing unnecessary danger or risk”.

      Yesterday, 17 kilometres of coastline was cleaned of oil. Clean-up teams have so far collected 50 tonnes of solid waste and 5 tonnes of liquid waste. Today the coastline from Whangamata to Whakatane will be assessed by the SCAT (Shoreline Clean-up Assessment Team) to determine the areas of highest priority for cleanup. The teams will then work methodically through the affected areas. There is a massive operation underway today with around 500 responders on the beach.
      Looking at the crack in the hull amidships it looks bad but not necessarily fatal. If the weather subside she is still salvageable.

      From the latest pictures and videos the "empty" containers on board is not that empty after all. A lot of stuff, not all of it looking harmless, appears to be floating in the water.
      Last edited by ombugge; October 13th, 2011, 16:44.

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        Re: Random maritime accidents.

        Now they have charge the Second officer as well, before ANYBODY can possibly know what actually happened.

        I investigated a tug accident in India where 4 people died. When the Indonesian survivors were brought ashore they were arrested "in case they deliberately caused the sinking". The Master and Officers of the Indian tanker that had been involved was free to go.

        Am I an old cynic??? Yes, a very experienced such.
        I would have thought that New Zealand was above such things. After all it is an island nation with a prouved maritime history.

        To be a seaman today is regarded on par with any "low life" ashore. No wonder there is a problem finding qualified people to man the the world fleet that we all depend on for cheap transportation.
        Last edited by ombugge; October 13th, 2011, 17:42.

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          Re: Random maritime accidents.

          Originally posted by ombugge View Post
          ...To be a seaman today is regarded on par with any "low life" ashore. No wonder there is a problem finding qualified people to man the the world fleet that we all depend on for cheap transportation.
          Now, that is a statement me and ombugge can totally agree upon.

          I have noticed quite a few times, when people asked where do I work, they get this strange look upon their face when I tell them I'm a seaman.

          In Trondheim right now, with great help from Adressa, it's also not so popular to be a Fjord1 employee.
          With best regards from Jan-Olav Storli

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            Re: Random maritime accidents.

            If the ship had run aground without spilling fuel and dropping containers overboard i wonder if the same arrests would have been made? I think this is probably a case of politics. The government obviously feels that it should put on a big show to keep the voters happy. Bit like the US government and the BP incident in the gulf. It really bugs me when the politicians start delving into things they have no right to.
            Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

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              Re: Random maritime accidents.

              Further to the last two posts:
              Eleven of the Rena crew have quit and have boarded flights back to the Philippines. This leaves only 6 crewmen behind including the Captain and Second Mate who both have been charged in court. A growing anger towards the crew has started an anti-Filipinos sentiment in the communities impacted by the oil spill.
              Irrational? Yes of course, but it happen all the time and in any country.

              Comment


                Re: Random maritime accidents.

                Latest on Shipwreck Log:
                The Rena has moved further on to the Astrolabe reef which has stabilized the vessel and may allow salvage teams time to pump off the remaining oil and diesel fuel on board. The Rena now is listing at 22 degrees to starboard with its starboard railing at or below the waterline. Oil recovery may begin the next day as salvage crews begin to setup equipment. Reports state the team will attempt to empty the largest oil tank of 700 tons then move on to the smaller 350 to 400 ton tank. Some 55 out of the 88 containers have been located or ashore. Authorities state that the containers will be collected on Motiti Island.
                Sounds like thing are improving, but everything is about the oil spill and removing the oil from the ship. If she could move further onto the reef, it MAY have been possible to pull her off the reef with the oil on board, given enough towing power and the ships own engine on full astern. Now you can forget that option.

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                  Re: Random maritime accidents.

                  I don't blame the crew, If I were the crew I would get out of the country as quick as possible to avoid arrest. If there are charges to be brought I would rather be on my own soil with my government helping especially if there is a witch hunt.

                  Comment


                    Re: Random maritime accidents.

                    Originally posted by ombugge View Post
                    Latest on Shipwreck Log:


                    Sounds like thing are improving, but everything is about the oil spill and removing the oil from the ship. If she could move further onto the reef, it MAY have been possible to pull her off the reef with the oil on board, given enough towing power and the ships own engine on full astern. Now you can forget that option.
                    These days the fuel and oil removal will always be given priority over attempting to save a ship. I am not saying that is wrong, but i do feel a few recent casualties could have been saved if action was taken sooner. I am certain that the 'Riverdance' could have been pulled from the beach at Blackpool a few years back if the salvers had been allowed to attempt to do so. Authorities insisted that they removed the fuel before attempting to remove her. Too late by the time that was done, she settled on her side in the soft sand. And the Napoli, instead of risking taking her into a port, they chose the safe option of grounding her. Turned out she was a lot stronger than originally thought. But, when i consider the damage that could be done to local wildlife and beaches etc, if things did go wrong whilst attempting to save the vessel, i can understand why they always take the safer option when it come to pollution risk.
                    Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                    Comment


                      Re: Random maritime accidents.

                      The classical example is the Prestige, where a ship seeking shelter was refused entry and eventually towed away from the coast, only to break up and sink, causing one of the worst oil spill in Europe for many years.
                      Then they arrested and charged the Master for causing it.

                      Comment


                        Re: Random maritime accidents.

                        Latest from Shipwreck Log re: Rena:
                        The container ship Rena continues to be firmly stuck on the astrolabe reef off Tauranga, New Zealand. The bow section has not moved, but the stern section has begun to shift to further to port. The vessel is now twisted with the large cracks along both sides of the hull. This leaves the vessel structurally unsound and unable to be pulled off the reef. If the heavy oil can be removed, tugs may attempt to tow the stern section away from the reef to deeper water where it would be allowed to sink.

                        The salvage crew were unable to pump oil off the Rena due to the heavy swells. There had been concerns that the vessel would break up in the rough weather, but conditions improved allowing the three man crew to return to the vessel. Their focus is now to continue pumping out the port tank which holds around 700 tons of heavy oil.
                        Looking at this picture you can see how the vessel is bent "like a banana":


                        I'm afraid that seal the faith of this vessel. She will either break up totally and the aft ship sink near the reef, or the aft ship may remain afloat and be towed away some distance, before being deliberately scuttled in deep water.

                        If the aft ship should float reasonably steady on it's own, there will be a fight to allow it to be tow into port to salvage the containers and what is left of the ship. (The expensive part, incl. the Engine Room, propeller and rudder and the Superstructure)

                        Most of the remaining fuel is likely in undamaged tanks in the aft ship and doesn't post any environmental damage while the vessel remain afloat. If they pump out the fuel the aft ship may be come unstable and capsize. The remaining fuel will then have to be removed from the wreck at some depth, or left in place to be a constant source of discussion and a threat for the next 20+ years.

                        Watch this space.
                        Last edited by ombugge; October 19th, 2011, 08:10.

                        Comment


                          Re: Random maritime accidents.

                          What a nightmare situation. I think only a very long spell of perfect weather is going to help the salvers now. This job was hard enough at Branscombe with the ship (Napoli) sitting firmly on a flat sea bed, so that alone tells me just how difficult this situation is.

                          Even if they do manage to separate the stern of the vessel, i wonder what the local maritime authorities will agree with regard to where it should be towed to? I would think the sinking in deep water idea would be a desperate last option. I wonder if the authorities would allow it to be brought into a port, i guess that would depend on just how stable the vessel would be. If deemed to unstable to enter a safe port, i wonder if the authorities would allow the salvers to beach the vessel is a more sheltered position? I remember the outcry in this country when the government gave permission for the Napoli to be grounded in Lyme Bay.

                          One thing is for certain, if she breaks up altogether before cargo and fuel have been removed, then it's not just the oil they want to be worried about. The containers and their contents are going to make a monumental mess. Only a couple of dozen escaped from the Napoli but the mess they made on their own was tremendous. Especially a problem when they come ashore on inaccessible shore lines. Not to mention the hazards to shipping when they start floating into shipping lanes nearly totally submerged. I hate to think of what mess and pollution a couple of thousand containers will make, the pollution they cause will be around a lot longer than the pollution caused by the fuel.
                          Last edited by Steve.B; October 19th, 2011, 12:30.
                          Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                          Comment


                            Re: Random maritime accidents.

                            Some of the containers are reported to be empties for re-positioning.
                            You can see a number of reefer containers here as well. If those are full of beef, mutton or butter etc. and float up on some populated beach that could become a nice mess, with the smell to go with it.

                            Comment


                              Re: Random maritime accidents.

                              The contents of the reefers must be getting a bit ripe by now - not nice!
                              Forgive me mentioning the Napoli again, but i remember how much mess just one of her containers made - thousands of plastic bottles of shampoo. V05 shampoo littering the shores for miles of coastline. A year after the accident i was on the IOW and found hundreds of the things still littering the remote shores on the southern coast. And that was just one container full. Nobody wanted them because the bottles were still covered in sticky tar from the heavy fuel.
                              Your charts, your radar, your eyes and ears - if all 4 agree, you may proceed with caution.

                              Comment


                                Re: Random maritime accidents.

                                Further to Steve's point. The small fishing vessel "New York" drifted ashore of Oregon, USA:
                                The 50 foot fishing vessel New York went ashore near Coos Bay, Oregon. The crew contacted the Coast Guard that the vessel had water ingress and required assistance. The Coast Guard launched the 47 foot lifeboat along with a Dolphin helicopter to the scene. The Helicopter attempted to hoist the three men on board the New York, but the heavy surf made the fishing vessel to unstable. The three men on the fishing vessel were able to swim ashore on their own. The Coast Guard transported the men back to North Bend station where EMS were awaiting. No reports of injuries, but there is large amounts of debris and some pollution released. The New York had 300 gallons of diesel fuel and 15 gallons of hydraulic oil on board at the time of the incident. An oil spill response contractor has been hired to assess and perform clean-up operations.



                                From Shipwreck Log.

                                Imagine what the beach would look like if a 18000 TEU Container ship had grounded and disgorged it load.
                                Last edited by ombugge; October 25th, 2011, 07:38.

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